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Thread: What's for dinner

  1. #1
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    Default What's for dinner

    Herb infused rotisserie chicken and and garlic roasted brussels sprouts.







    And leftovers turn into chicken soup

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    I did almost the exact same meal. Except I de-boned some thighs. Clipped some of the neighbors rosemary, mixed it with some bread crumbs and parm and baked it. The Brussels sprouts I did by pan frying the face for a couple minutes after tossing with onions and olive oil and S&P. Then into the oven with the chicken. Threw some bacon chunks in there and mixed them up with a squirt of lemon and a splash of balsamic oil for the last few minutes.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Very nice! I don't have a rotisserie, so I spatchcock my bird and dry brine it with salt and a little bit of baking powder, crisps up the skin magnificently.
    I'll just take my chances with those salt water joys.

    AR

  4. #4
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    So I prep the chicken with aromatics (fresh rosemary, thyme, & oregano ), put Lemon halves, rosemary sprigs, kosher salt, black pepper and garlic in the cavity. I make a aromatic infused butter with salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary etc and bush the skin with it. Pop in the rotisserie for 2 hrs.

    Brussel sprouts are steamed first. I put some more aromatics in the water. Strain into a bowl with minced garlic and olive oil, kosher salt, black pepper and put on a oven sheet and broil checking to turn.
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  5. #5

    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Your on a roll Joe, I seriously need to up my dinner game.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Damn, post got lost in the intertubes, I'll retype it.

    I'm hosting a dinner party saturday for a few friends, so I guess this is the place to brag.

    Starting with a cheese plate, then stuffed mushroom caps, half of em Italian sausage with a little fennel and cheese, half escargot for the more advenderous, smothered in garlic and butter. Next, a thin basil heavy tomato soup. Main is a 7 pound top sirloin roast I'm going to do low and slow, with a reverse sear to bring it to medium - medium rare. That's going in the fridge tonight with a dry rub wrapped in cheesecloth to start dry brining. Dessert is a simple very creamy baked cheesecake flavoured with just a little lemon zest. Lubrication is my homemade merlot, cab sav, gewürztraminer, and orange chocolate port.

    Good food is an end in itself.
    I'll just take my chances with those salt water joys.

    AR

  7. #7
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Dinner last night.

    Tom

    "Leave the gun, take the cannolis"

  8. #8
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Tom are those gulf coast oysters. Renee has become infatuated with west coast oysters, Hama Hama and Kumamoto's
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe ( Cold Spring on Hudson ) View Post
    Tom are those gulf coast oysters. Renee has become infatuated with west coast oysters, Hama Hama and Kumamoto's
    These were gulf coast oysters. West coast oysters are also very good.
    Tom

    "Leave the gun, take the cannolis"

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by ccmanuals View Post
    These were gulf coast oysters. West coast oysters are also very good.
    I remember eating dozens and dozens of apalachicola oysters and cold beer at a dive bar off the tourist area in Key West - good times
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe ( Cold Spring on Hudson ) View Post
    I remember eating dozens and dozens of apalachicola oysters and cold beer at a dive bar off the tourist area in Key West - good times
    yep, best when they are really cold, a little salty and fresh. I have to have a strong horseradish sauce and of course some saltine crackers.
    Tom

    "Leave the gun, take the cannolis"

  12. #12
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    I made chicken too. The lazy way. Boneless, skinless thighs - 10 hours in the slow-cooker with basil, garlic, sake, celery, potatoes, carrots, and onions. Mighty tasty. Fudge brownie ice cream for dessert.
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  13. #13
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    gonna do a baked pasta dish tonight with a béchamel mornay sauce and jumbo lump crab meat and seared bits of pork belly
    otherwise known as baked mac and cheese with crab and bacon

    but while technically i'm correct in calling my base roux a béchamel sauce, I never like to pass up on the chance of being called a food snob by Phillip Allen
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    left over smoked salmon,

    tried out the new masterbuilt electric over the weekend and smoked a whole coho for the game on Sunday.

    my new favorite toy.
    Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business.
    TOM ROBBINS, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues



  15. #15
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Rosemary roasted potatoes, with stir fried tofu and veggies, mushrooms. . .

    __________________________________________________ ________________________

  16. #16
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Thinking of some Grass Fed Strip Steaks tonight with haricot vert.
    Prepared simply rubbed with garlic dusted with kosher salt and seared on a cast iron pan thats been building heat.
    Strings beans in butter, white wine, garlic.
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Fritatta. Bacon, brown rice, spinach, garlic, fresh dill snipped from the hydroponic lab, cheddar. Rye toast alongside. Porter.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  18. #18
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Fritatta.
    because real men don't eat quiche. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  19. #19
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    Default

    If I'm going frittata over quiche, it's because I'm watching my calories. Like a man.
    A boatless inlander, searching for the meaning of life-aground.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    I made chicken piccata tonight... Served with some risotto. Got rave reviews from SWMBO.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  21. #21
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    because real men don't eat quiche. . .
    Oops... I may not be, then. I eat quiche. And crepes. And brie. And white wine. Among other things. <G>
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  22. #22
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Grass fed strip steak, with a port wine and shallot reduction, with haricot vert steamed with fresh herbs.

    Yea I had to elevate the dish with the port wine shallot reduction





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  23. #23
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    I'm wondering about the sweetness of that sauce. Too sweet?

  24. #24
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by ccmanuals View Post
    West coast oysters are also very good.
    Hard to get decent oysters in Wyoming, but the fishmonger at Safeway said she took a shipment from Washington that morning, so I got a dozen. Just bought a Murphy oyster knife and learned to shuck them, which doesn't require genius or great skill. (Even a New Yorker could do it.) I took the irregular ones (L) and gave the perfect ones to the Wolf Goddess.

    We don't need cracked ice or cocktail sauce or lemon. Just crusty bread, butter, and a dewy glass of sauv blanc.



    They were quite a bit better than the Chesapeake oysters I got last time I was in Colorado. I'll try not to go overboard. Twice a month is a treat.
    Last edited by Chip-skiff; 01-19-2016 at 08:51 PM.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Sky Blue View Post
    I'm wondering about the sweetness of that sauce. Too sweet?
    No surprising it wasn't. This honestly was my first attempt. Renee had received a nice bottle of vintage Taylor as a christmas tip 2 years ago and I decided to go for it.

    I started a heated pan with good irish butter and added shredded shallots until they caramelized added some Kosher salt and fresh rosemary and thyme . After I pulled the steaks from the cast iron pan I added the mixture to the pan juice and then added about a cup and a half of port. It was amazing how fast it reduced down to a nice AMAZINGLY flavorful sauce. Think of the best steak sauce you've ever had served warm. Good Stuff
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  26. #26
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Yes, not hard to shuck oysters. All you need to know is the location of the adductor muscle, and have enough dexterity to insert the blade and slice it loose. Don't rip open your hands on the shells or the knife. Quick & easy with a minimal of practice. After trying oysters every which way I've every heard of.... I've yet to find one I didn't like. My favorite, though, is still breaded & pan-fried. The way momma used to make 'em.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  27. #27
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Yes, the sauce looks fabulous and I like the thicker viscosity when there is no starch and it just dresses the steak. You've got a healthy, light meal going there, with the sauce lending a rich, decadent touch. I'd like to try it.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Yes, not hard to shuck oysters. All you need to know is the location of the adductor muscle, and have enough dexterity to insert the blade and slice it loose. Don't rip open your hands on the shells or the knife. Quick & easy with a minimal of practice. After trying oysters every which way I've every heard of.... I've yet to find one I didn't like. My favorite, though, is still breaded & pan-fried. The way momma used to make 'em.
    It's all easy until the oyster slips and the shell cuts you it's never the dull knife the cuts you.

    You haven't Lived until you've had the Grand Central Oyster Bar's oyster pan roast



    Below, the elements of the Grand Central Oyster Bar's oyster pan roast:
    1. The Stew

    The stew begins with clam juice that has been fortified with clam base. Ingber explains that because of the tremendous volume, the restaurant uses high-end pre-made clam juice and clam base, instead of making them in house. The fortified clam juice is added to the pan with unsalted butter. After that comes to a boil, the oysters are added, and then rest of the stew ingredients: celery salt, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, Heinz chili sauce, and half and half. Ingber explains that each component is a vital contributor to the overall flavor of the dish. Celery salt is the only salt added to the dish, while just a few dashes of Worcestershire balance out the brine of the clam juice and the oysters themselves. Ingber says the tomato-based chili sauce — also a key component of the cocktail sauce at the Oyster Bar — adds a tangy kick without being overly spicy. It also adds body and a pinkish tint to the stew, with paprika rounding out the flavors. Ingber uses half and half to add a rich, silky texture to the stew, finding cream on its own to be too heavy.
    2. The Oysters

    The star ingredients of the stew are six shucked Blue Point oysters. Ingber explains that Blue Points are mild, but with enough brininess to add flavor to the stew. That brine also imparts a necessary saltiness to the stew. While Blue Points work well from a flavor perspective, Ingber explains that there's more to the decision than just taste. He explains that since the Grand Central Oyster Bar is such a New York City icon, many diners are tourists looking for a full-blown "New York City experience." He explains that Blue Point oysters have the most name recognition of any of the East Coast oysters and are the restaurant's best-selling oyster some five times over. With that in mind, including Blue Points in the pan roast is another way to keep it quintessentially New York, as the oysters hail from the Long Island Sound.

    3. The Assembly

    One of the signature components of the dish is the stainless steel steam-jacketed kettle in which it is prepared. This pan is similar to a double boiler, with steam being released in between an outer steel wall and an inner steel wall that hold the contents of the pan. Ingber explains that the high heat steam accelerates the cooking process, which is critical because both the dairy and the oysters in the stew can overcook easily.
    Ingber estimates that from start to finish, cooking the pan roast takes only three minutes or so. The entire dish is assembled and cooked in the pan, beginning with the fortified clam juice and butter. When that comes to a boil, the raw oysters are added. When the oysters are about half-way done, the paprika, celery salt, and Worcestershire sauce are added. The pan is turned, and then the chili sauce goes in. Shortly before the oysters are completely cooked the half and half is added. In the meanwhile, a soup bowl is prepped with a piece of white toast that's been cut into triangles. The finished oysters are removed from the stew and placed directly on top of the toast. Ingber explains that after the half and half is added, the stew must not be allowed to boil again or else the half and half will break. To prevent that from happening, the stew is poured directly over the oysters and toast just as it is about to reach a boil. The last step is to finish the soup with a bit of paprika and serve it with Westminster Oyster Crackers.
    Last edited by Joe (SoCal); 01-19-2016 at 09:17 PM.
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  29. #29
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Have you tried the reverse method for steaks? Good for steaks at least 1" or preferably thicker.

    Preheat the oven to 250°F. Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel (kosher salt optional) and place in a pan with a rack, turning at about 15 minutes and slow-cooking until the meat thermometer reads 190°F.

    Sear the steaks in butter in a hot skillet on all sides (use tongs to do the edges) and serve immediately.

    Restaurant perfect. No gray zone: medium rare meat with a dark, seared crust.

    I've made reduction sauces using half dry red wine and half fruit juice (pomegranate, currant, cherry). Very rich and savoury, but not sweet.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    The Grand Central oyster stew sounds good. That's the traditional Christmas Eve meal in my wife's family. Now that I can shuck oysters, it should take a major leap in terms of quality.

    (I got those no-cut gloves, but have no problem gripping the oysters— they're pretty rough, and the essential actions are wiggling the point in, twisting to pop the hinge, and shearing/scraping to detach the shell. Not a great deal of brute force involved. The only incident so far was a thin-shelled oyster that shattered in my grip.)

  31. #31
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Sky Blue View Post
    Yes, the sauce looks fabulous and I like the thicker viscosity when there is no starch and it just dresses the steak. You've got a healthy, light meal going there, with the sauce lending a rich, decadent touch. I'd like to try it.
    I agree and in all honesty is was a lot thicker than it appeared much thicker than my usual pan juices.
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  32. #32
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Nippy here tonight. Raw, damp cold. Got home after my workout ( kinda light one but I needed the break) for a nice heavy pea soup. Ham chunks and a bit of corn, carrots and pasta. Toasted buttered roll on the side and an orange for dessert. Darn good.

    Im going to try that steak-in-the-oven technique. Thanks, all.
    Brute force and ignorance, all in one bulky and unappealing package

  33. #33
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    My wife uses a calphalon grill pan for steaks, chicken etc. and they come out great. Even have the nice grill marks.

    Tom

    "Leave the gun, take the cannolis"

  34. #34
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    Have you tried the reverse method for steaks? Good for steaks at least 1" or preferably thicker.

    Preheat the oven to 250°F. Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel (kosher salt optional) and place in a pan with a rack, turning at about 15 minutes and slow-cooking until the meat thermometer reads 190°F.

    Sear the steaks in butter in a hot skillet on all sides (use tongs to do the edges) and serve immediately.

    Restaurant perfect. No gray zone: medium rare meat with a dark, seared crust.
    Quote Originally Posted by coelacanth2 View Post
    Im going to try that steak-in-the-oven technique. Thanks, all.
    190°F (!?) and the steaks will be good for pemmican.

    Suggest ~130°F for medium rare.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: What's for dinner

    Herb roasted chicken in pan juice. With sage glazed new potatoes and carrots and garlic sauté spinach.

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