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Thread: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

  1. #1
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    Default Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods



    The Zeta main hull is similar to the Zest but a bit narrower. It does have a footwell, as indicated by the dotted line running along the top of the daggerboard case. The outriggers can be made from 2 sheets of ply, so you need 7 sheets 4mm and 1 sheet 6mm to build the whole boat. It could certainly be built in a week.
    Plans will be available end of November (2015).
    The Zeta is a bit like a 14ft version of the 10ft Duo/Tryst (lots of those building/sailing now BTW). Tryst details can be seen here: http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.p...tryst-trimaran



    http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs/27-trimarans-under-25/458-zeta-14ft-singlehanded-trimaran

    Wonder if a Mirage Drive could be fitted?
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 11-14-2015 at 04:01 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    A poor man's Weta perhaps? Sleek looking.

    I guess the Weta claims family sailing so not sure how comparable.
    Last edited by wsgilliam; 11-14-2015 at 08:54 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    Thank you for posting details of my new Zeta trimaran. I am finishing off the plans right now and they should be available by the end of next week. I hadn't considered using a Mirage drive, I think maybe the crew weight would be too far aft and the transom will immerse when using one. And it would have to be removed for sailing so that the daggerboard can be fitted.

    I also don't think a Mirage drive would get a lot of use. The Zeta is sort of based on my 14ft Zest dinghy, but with a narrower main hull. The Zeta outriggers are each made from 1 sheet of 3mm ply, so add little weight. Zeta has a bigger rig than Zest that will more than compensate for the extra weight

    Many of you will have seen this video of my 2 day build Zest at the Port Townsend WBF

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxe6y-xsd0Q

    and you can see it is sailing fast in almost no wind. If the wind really does drop to nothing then my one hand paddle will work

    http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.p...ne-hand-paddle

    We'll see, as I plan to build a Zeta next summer. Meantime I still have my Zest and Strike 15 to sail. The latter is more of a project to build but has better load carrying for 2 crew or basic beach camping

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    Are the amas a deep-V design? -- Wade

  5. #5

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    My apologies for the delay in replying. we were cruising through Louisiana on our Skoota 28 power cat. Just arrived in New Orleans

    Yes the outriggers are simple deep V hulls. Both outriggers are made from 3 sheets of 3mm ply, so each weighs under 20lbs. Long and thin to minimise resistance, they have enough buoyancy so the crew doesn't need to hike too actively. I have found, when sailing my Tryst and Strike 15 trimarans, that they are easy to sail because it is almost impossible to capsize to windward. Obviously if you are overpowered it is easy to release the mainsheet. But everyone who is no longer active (like me) appreciates that as a safety factor when the wind drops and the boat tries to heel to windward

    Several Zetas are now building

    Hope that helps

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    Panel layout for Zeta. 5 plan sets aready sold.



    Basic Material List
    6 sheets 4mm plywood, (or 3 sheets 4mm, 3 sheets 3mm)
    1 sheet 6mm plywood
    1in x1in 35m
    11/2in x 1in 5m
    3kgs epoxy
    50m 50mm glass tape

    1000 18mm (3/4in) no6 st steel screws
    wood flour and filler as required

    Richard, do you have the link for the very good value sail for Zeta, cannot find it just now. ( edit - found the link
    http://www.intensitysails.com/howamasa.html )

    Is there anyway Richard to allow beam reduction for dinghy park storage. My dinghy park space at Keyhaven is typical in allowing 16' long but only 6' wide. The best and simplest system I have come across is where the starboard arms/tubes are just ahead of the port arms/tubes and they slaide past each other as the floats are slid in to the hull sides for quick and easy storage. This seems to be much simpler and stronger than any kind of folding system.

    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 12-11-2015 at 10:43 AM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    If you are looking for a cheap mainsail I'd go for a Moth sail, JC must still have some. Or a Buzz?

    I was in Keyhaven a few months ago so know the space you have. There are several ways to reduce a trimaran beam, as I am sure you know. The outriggers can fold up (as I use on my Strike 16, 18, 20) or fold fore/aft (as I do on my Strike 15, also used on the Dragonfly, Ocean Bird etc) Or fold down, as on Farrier designs and their many copies. Or, as you say, sliding beams, although they do squeak and groan, furthermore have you tried opening two wooden drawers at the same time? Sliding beams are a bit like that.

    But those systems are all too complicated for a small boat like the Zeta and they add weight and the geometry doesn't work too well. Also it would be impractical to fit a boat cover.

    So I have drawn simple slide apart beams, joined on the boat centreline. A bit like the old demountable tube wing Moths. That also means the boat can easily come apart completely. When I build mine I expect to cartop it. So 4 bolts (or drop nose pins) and 4 lashings

    That way the mast can be left up even with the outriggers removed, so rigging won't be too long. And since the boat is fast I bet that if we arrived at your club at the same time and I rigged a Zeta while you rigged a scow I could beat you to Hurst!

    Email me direct at woodsdesigns@gmail.com and I'll send you the assembly plan sheets so you can see what I have drawn

    Hope that helps

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    I use a sliding tube system on my "safety ama" to bring my 16 foot outrigger to 8.5 feet trailering width. Obviously, the looser the fit, the easier the sliding, but that is annoying; my system is annoying, since I used available windsurfer masts for the safety ama crossbeams, a good 0.25 inch too loose for the aluminum tubes lashed behind the permanent crossbeams. My shrouds go to the crossbeams, and to some extent shroud tension keeps the fore telescoping crossbeam polite, but just barely. I do allow the crossbeam attachments on the ama to pivot (single bolt through each crossbeam into the ama) so that an uneven push or pull does not bind up the telescoping tubes (this is a deep-V ama with a flat deck, which is friendly to crossbeams that can swing a bit on the deck). That would help a lot, especially on a system with a tighter fit.

    I witnessed a tight-fit telescoping system on a small trimaran (Tridarka Raider design by Matt Layden) entered in the Everglades Challenge race. At the finish point I helped the owner push in both amas for the trailer-- it would have been a bit of annoying work without two people coordinating their efforts on these nicely tight tube-amas. (I think the design used plastic spacers to insure the good fit.)

    My next try at folding amas will use a version of the Jim Brown/John Marples method on the Seaclipper 20. I think Mr. Woods fold-back-version is also good. The more often your sailing jaunts are just an an available afternoon on a trailer-sailer, seems to me the more important an annoyance-free folding system is. – Wade
    Last edited by wtarzia; 12-14-2015 at 03:59 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    My dinghy space at Keyhaven is maximum 14' length and max 2 metre width of boat when stored. Richard kindly e-mailed me the assembly drawing, and it appears that by simply extracting two bolts at the middle of the boat which hold the half width beam, and releasing the gunnel clamps, an outrigger can be moved sideways a few inches and then slid inwards to the side of the main hull. The half beams then rest on the gunnels. Same the other side. Total width is then just under 6' just under what I am allowed. Would then be quite quick to re-assemble for sailing. Just slide out, beam end into socket plus bolt, re-clamp at the gunnel. Rig staying up saves a lot of time as well, so should be quicker to go sailing than my sailing canoe with outriggers.
    Probably would need a smaller rig accounting for my old age, balance issues and windy location.

    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 12-15-2015 at 04:54 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    I'm building a 16 foot single-outrigger with a safety ama (quasi-tri? Main hull beam 2 feet amidships, and 10 or 11 feet total beam, but favoring the single-outrigger side) and hope to get the folding width to 4 feet (dim hopes of making this light enough for those rare occasions when it would be nice to car-top the boat). On sketches, the main outrigger rotates backward (like a Seaclipper), and the safety ama rotates up and over and across the hull using a Gary Dierking style cross-beam hinge (he uses it on his single-outrigger Va-Motu design and is proven strong).

    This is done with 4 foot crossbeams attached to the hull, with ~2 feet sticking out to port, which provides 2 feet over over with the rotating-aft cross-beams. For the safety ama with a 3 or 4 foot as measured out from the gunwale, the Dierking hinge permits that component to overlap the hull when folded up and over, thus the 4 feet folded beam....in theory. The 6 foot folded beam discussed above could be achieved for a full-tri with the fold-aft scheme working on the permanent 6 foot cross beams, with the folded amas resting under that structure -- and it sure could be nice to have a folded tri IN the water and able to be moved around the dock (ie, you tied up temporarily to the wrong spot), and able to be paddled if necessary in the folded state. -- Wade

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    I have bought Richards plans and will be starting to build a variation next month using an ISO dinghy rig - I'm basically looking to make a cheap Weta style alternative.

    I am planning on making larger outriggers and making it broader and have the same issue as Brian with limited storage down at Mudeford. I will be making it demountable to fit the space but I am also building in options for hydrofoils once the boat is up and running.

    Brian I'm only just round the corner from you - perhaps we could meet up some time and share some thoughts around the projects.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    That would be good, although I reckon I am looking at a much less powerful boat for more gentle sailing. I thought I had replied to your PM but not sure if it worked.

    Brian

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    Hi Brian,

    No pm came through - I will pm my email address to you separately now.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    I have just uploaded photos of the first Zeta being built in the UK (not Kaymaran's)
    You can see them here

    http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.p...anded-trimaran

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  15. #15

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    It took some time, mainly because we were doing other things, but we at last launched our Zeta a couple of weeks ago. You can see it for real at the Port Townsned WBF next week. If you cannot get there you will have to make do with these two videos

    The first taken on the first sail is here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AS7rgAbw9OU only primer paint and a 20 year old sail

    Then the second is here, with a home made screecher and final paint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUL4QnL7oxo

    You should be able to spot it on the water even with 200 other boats sailing around in Port Townsend bay!

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    Richard, are there factors other than the Zest heritage that made you stick with a more dinghy-like main hull? Ditto for the Tryst/Duo design.

    What I really want to know is what difference in performance one can expect from a much more slender waterline beam.
    The Italian 10ft Diecipiedi development class trimarans seem to lean towards super-skinny hulls. Would the much greater displacement/length ratio of a 10 footer call for a different set of design decisions if speed was the goal?

  17. #17

    Default Re: Zeta 14' Trimaran from Richard Woods

    The Tryst/Duo hull is actually very different to the Zeta/Zest, despite them looking similar at first glance. The Tryst is really a stabilized Duo, and the latter is designed as a yacht tender, a rowing boat, and a boat that can be built from 2 sheets of ply. So the hull shape is optimised for 4.5 knots, maximum rowing speed. And the displacement is such that it can take three adults rowing and motoring (not when sailing as one occupant sits on the mast step, another in the tiller area.) I don't think the Italian class boats can carry three people and be motored? Certainly if I designed a singlehanded 1 person 10ft boat it would be very different to the Duo/Tryst

    The Zest has a planing hull and proportionately less load carrying, in part because it has an open transom. The Zeta hull shape is similar, but is about 100mm narrower as obviously it has outriggers for stability and also has a somewhat larger rig.

    A finer hull has proportionately more WSA so is slower at low speeds. But a finer hull is faster at higher speeds as wave making is proportional to waterline beam cubed. So it is always a tradeoff/compromise.

    So when you say "speed was the goal" would you mean maximum possible speed, or max speed for the conditions where you sail. Which are not always the same. I have sailed in PE, pretty windy and big seas compared to anywhere in the USA and even in most of the UK. The smaller the boat the bigger the compromises.

    I am still thinking that a low rider Moth with outriggers might not be a bad single hander boat, I'd give it a go but I have too many boats already.....

    Not sure if that helped? If not, please email me at woodsdesigns@gmail.com to discuss it further.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs
    www.sailingcatamarans.com
    Last edited by Richard of Woods Designs; 02-06-2018 at 03:20 AM.

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