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Thread: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

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    Default Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    So, Iím in the process of researching for another novel, and I need to decide upon a sailboat that will work for my plot. Iíve come up with a couple options, but Iím afraid I might be overlooking something in my ignorance, so please bear with me.

    Here are the basics that I need to work around:

    1) The year is 1984.

    2) The captain is a 25-year-old Creole woman who grew up living on a sailboat. She also has a US Coastguard certification.

    3) She runs the family-owned bareboat cruise business, catering to high-end customers, so Iím thinking something in the 60-70ft range, but I want as small a crew as possible (easier for me and my readers to keep track of).

    4) Grand Cayman Island is the destination, with perhaps some interaction with Cuba.

    5) The passengers will consist of the skipper, the guest passenger (who also has some sailing experience), the cook (role played by my main character who can act as a deck hand), and a skeletal crew.

    6) Ideally, the boat will be sailing out of New Orleans (which is where the skipper and main character meet up)óIím thinking the Southern Yacht Club would be a good point of departure, unless there is some compelling reason Iím unaware of that would make it impossible.

    7) Because the boat is as much a character as the people, Iíd like it to be a classic wooden boat, of course. My first impulse is to say a Herreshoff schooner, but all those sails may require a larger crew, so I am open to suggestions. Also, if there are any considerations that I have not included in my list, please feel free to alert me!

    Iíve already checked out http://www.classicyachtforsale.com/
    and https://www.woodenboat.com/boats-sale. I found this: http://www.classicyachtforsale.com/syVixenII.html. Aesthetically, it's perfectóI'm just concerned that she would require a crew larger than what I want to include--any thoughts on crew size and all that?

    Also, http://www.classicyachtforsale.com/sySonic.html is an option, but not as spacious. I wonder if you expectations are entirely unrealistic, even for fiction!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    A bareboat is just that - only the charterers, no captain or crew. And very few would bare boat a 60+ foot vessel anyway.

    Sounds like you're creating a one person charter party which is unusual enough that the reason will no doubt be part of your story. Even a couple is rare for that size boat. More likely two couples. But there could well be business or prestige or port to port entertainment reasons for a single person charter party. Or something more mysterious.

    A schooner can be complex and require a large crew to handle many kites (the ancillary sails beyond main, fore, forestaysail and jib) but if you have that basic rig, if the sail controls have been well thought out including easy reefing, lazy lifts, and not much in the way of running backstays, then a strong sailor could singlehand her but the cook's job is arduous enough that you probably should have a first mate as good a sailor as the captain. If the charter party will actively sail, standing watches and all that, then in four dedicated sailors (captain and guest, mate and hand) who can trade watches with two on at any time and the cook available. But a boat that size could probably use an engineer/sailor who, like the cook, does not stand a watch but is available for major drills like anchoring or mooring to a dock and who otherwise does what engineers are valued for - making all go well with no break downs.

    Something like Vixen would work. The staysail schooners I've sailed are very handy since you can get rid of the fisherman (a better sail than that thing they show above the mainstaysail) easily. That rig (bottom right pic) is easily tacked or changed heading by two people but might want three, or take it slowly, if gybing. I don't see runners on her and for normal sailing the mast may be stiff enough, but have them at hand to oppose the mainstaysail's stay in a wind and to keep the mast from pumping.

    Sounds like fun.

    G'luck

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    The yawl's cute too, especially if you want it just the captain, cook an guest.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    A bareboat is just that - only the charterers, no captain or crew. And very few would bare boat a 60+ foot vessel anyway.

    Sounds like you're creating a one person charter party which is unusual enough that the reason will no doubt be part of your story. Even a couple is rare for that size boat. More likely two couples. But there could well be business or prestige or port to port entertainment reasons for a single person charter party. Or something more mysterious.

    A schooner can be complex and require a large crew to handle many kites (the ancillary sails beyond main, fore, forestaysail and jib) but if you have that basic rig, if the sail controls have been well thought out including easy reefing, lazy lifts, and not much in the way of running backstays, then a strong sailor could singlehand her but the cook's job is arduous enough that you probably should have a first mate as good a sailor as the captain. If the charter party will actively sail, standing watches and all that, then in four dedicated sailors (captain and guest, mate and hand) who can trade watches with two on at any time and the cook available. But a boat that size could probably use an engineer/sailor who, like the cook, does not stand a watch but is available for major drills like anchoring or mooring to a dock and who otherwise does what engineers are valued for - making all go well with no break downs.

    Something like Vixen would work. The staysail schooners I've sailed are very handy since you can get rid of the fisherman (a better sail than that thing they show above the mainstaysail) easily. That rig (bottom right pic) is easily tacked or changed heading by two people but might want three, or take it slowly, if gybing. I don't see runners on her and for normal sailing the mast may be stiff enough, but have them at hand to oppose the mainstaysail's stay in a wind and to keep the mast from pumping.

    Sounds like fun.

    G'luck
    Ian, thank you so much for weighing in! I really appreciate your explaining all that, and it will take a little while to absorb it, but this is what I need--those finer details!

    I'm still in the process of determining the character of the one (or couple) chartering the boat (am I using that term correctly? is the one chartering the party who hires the boat and crew?). I'd really like to limit the crew size to 5, so you've provided me with some helpful groundwork for figuring that out. Much appreciated!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    In the 1970's two of us sailed the 70ft converted 12m Flica 2 as a charter boat in the Caribbean with up to 6 guests. So even a big boat (it was ketch rigged) can be handled with a small crew and still look after guests. But I agree, it is unusual to have only one or two guests on a big boat. But it does happen. If the boat has a history, or is a classic then maybe someone would be desperate to sail it.

    Richard Woods

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    In most cases the vessel's owner hires the captain. Almost never the charter party unless the deal resembles commercial bare boat charters, not uncommon in some cargo trades. Then indeed the vessel's owner might not pick the captain, but simply ensure the captain's qualifications meet the insurance requirements.

    In the larger crewed charter trade, many boats are some wealthy person's tax deduction. Especially as you get to the maxi size (65'+) the captain has general administrative control, hiring crew, over all charge of supply and maintenance, and scheduling charters in between owner's use if that's desired.

    If you have the captain in charge of her family's yacht, there may be no major reason to sketch in how a woman so young came to be an owner of such a boat. If she got the boat on her own, there will be a story.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    In the 1970's two of us sailed the 70ft converted 12m Flica 2 as a charter boat in the Caribbean with up to 6 guests. So even a big boat (it was ketch rigged) can be handled with a small crew and still look after guests. But I agree, it is unusual to have only one or two guests on a big boat. But it does happen. If the boat has a history, or is a classic then maybe someone would be desperate to sail it.

    Richard Woods
    Thanks, Richard! I especially appreciate your first-hand experience.

    I'm thinking that the guest is either a very eccentric gentleman who likes privacy and classic old boats, or a wealthy young couple who don't like to share, ha! Each member of the crew needs to fill not only a specific role in sailing the boat, but also in providing something in the overall plot, or, in this case, adding in some way to the main character's development. I'll be working that out as I finalize my choice for a boat.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Of course the 'charterer" could actually be the wealthy owner who only uses the boat once a year, or is someone who is thinking of buying it. Seems unlikely that a 25yr old would actually own a 70ft schooner, especially back in 84 when big boats were rare

    RW

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    If you go for a smaller boat, like a Carriacou sloop
    she would be native to the waters you are cruising. She would need only a small crew, and her small size may allow you to introduce tensions between the characters.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    But make sure someone eases that topping lift!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    In most cases the vessel's owner hires the captain. Almost never the charter party unless the deal resembles commercial bare boat charters, not uncommon in some cargo trades. Then indeed the vessel's owner might not pick the captain, but simply ensure the captain's qualifications meet the insurance requirements.

    In the larger crewed charter trade, many boats are some wealthy person's tax deduction. Especially as you get to the maxi size (65'+) the captain has general administrative control, hiring crew, over all charge of supply and maintenance, and scheduling charters in between owner's use if that's desired.

    If you have the captain in charge of her family's yacht, there may be no major reason to sketch in how a woman so young came to be an owner of such a boat. If she got the boat on her own, there will be a story.
    Well, the boat has been in the family for years. They are originally from New Orleans but have a home on Grand Cayman. Their boating business profile may not be typical, but I think I can make it work. I hadn't thought of the option of the boat belonging to someone else and having the owner hire her, though it would seem likely that he'd hire someone older. hmmm...just thinking aloud. I think I prefer the idea of her family owning the boat and 'hiring out' the boat and captain for Caribbean adventures.

    As a side point, the skipper is a bit nuts (and I think the guest is also) revealed as the plot develops, which will add some great tension. I'm not talking mutiny, but my main character will have second thoughts about getting back on the boat once they land in Grand Cayman.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    Of course the 'charterer" could actually be the wealthy owner who only uses the boat once a year, or is someone who is thinking of buying it. Seems unlikely that a 25yr old would actually own a 70ft schooner, especially back in 84 when big boats were rare

    RW
    The boat actually belongs to her family, her father specifically--she was raised on the boat and he taught her to sail. She is quite able, but I think I may have over-estimated the size--which is why I've posted this! Thanks!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    If you go for a smaller boat, like a Carriacou sloop
    she would be native to the waters you are cruising. She would need only a small crew, and her small size may allow you to introduce tensions between the characters.
    She is native to the area, has been sailing it virtually all her short life! And you do bring up a good point about a smaller space allowing for more tension, and I will give that more thought. Just the same, this Carriacou sloop seems a bit too small!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbchicoine View Post
    She is native to the area, has been sailing it virtually all her short life! And you do bring up a good point about a smaller space allowing for more tension, and I will give that more thought. Just the same, this Carriacou sloop seems a bit too small!
    Boats are also "she". Sorry for causing confusion.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #15

    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    A 70ft boat may also be too deep drafted for New Orleans. 40-50ft would still be considered a big boat in 1984

    BTW you got some great reviews on Amazon!!

    RW

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Boats are also "she". Sorry for causing confusion.
    Doh!!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    A 70ft boat may also be too deep drafted for New Orleans. 40-50ft would still be considered a big boat in 1984

    BTW you got some great reviews on Amazon!!

    RW
    Yes--thank you for mentioning that. Sailing out of NOLA with a bigger boat was also a concern. I could go with Bay St. Louis or Gulfport (I haven't researched either), but New Orleans fits the plot...so, I think I'm going to have to rethink the size, scaling down to the 40-50ft range. Again, thanks (and thanks for looking at my ratings--still makes me blush! )

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    I see a big Piver tri. They were popular in the day, big for their time. Shallow draft .Hippies built them by the dozens in the seventies.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    My old Alden 43' schooner Goblin was lovely for term charters to a couple. My partner and I would clear out the lovely aft stateroom and move in to the forepeak, leaving a lovely place for the couple. The saloon, head and galley separated us at night so we were after a sort of niche market of honeymooners who liked a bit of traditional privetation - no electric lights, just kero, shower by handpump sprayer, and ice rather than reefer. After a week or so, you get to know the other couple.

    There are a lot of cruising couples who do at least some chartering this way. It really helps if one or both is an imaginative cook with a cast iron stomach. In the charter trade, the cooking really makes the trip. In my case, my McColgin indifference to food and my then partner's sometimes overly imaginative cooking were not a downfall but were areas that could have used improvement.

    We made up for that with cool sailing and good teaching skills so that the charterer learned lots, including piloting, weather anticipation, and on. Sometimes part of the deal was that I'd evaluate a party that did not have their own boat or much documented time, what they knew at the start and what they learned, so that a bareboat company could take them on as clients.

    Lots of little niches for the small operator. You're selling romance, after all.

    G'luck

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I see a big Piver tri. They were popular in the day, big for their time. Shallow draft .Hippies built them by the dozens in the seventies.
    That does look like it would be ample, space-wise...I guess I just kind of had my heart set on an old wooden boat. This might fill some of the criteria, but I'd have to stretch my imagination a whole lot wider--like three times as wide! ha! Thank you so much for your suggestion!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    My old Alden 43' schooner Goblin was lovely for term charters to a couple. My partner and I would clear out the lovely aft stateroom and move in to the forepeak, leaving a lovely place for the couple. The saloon, head and galley separated us at night so we were after a sort of niche market of honeymooners who liked a bit of traditional privetation - no electric lights, just kero, shower by handpump sprayer, and ice rather than reefer. After a week or so, you get to know the other couple.

    There are a lot of cruising couples who do at least some chartering this way. It really helps if one or both is an imaginative cook with a cast iron stomach. In the charter trade, the cooking really makes the trip. In my case, my McColgin indifference to food and my then partner's sometimes overly imaginative cooking were not a downfall but were areas that could have used improvement.

    We made up for that with cool sailing and good teaching skills so that the charterer learned lots, including piloting, weather anticipation, and on. Sometimes part of the deal was that I'd evaluate a party that did not have their own boat or much documented time, what they knew at the start and what they learned, so that a bareboat company could take them on as clients.

    Lots of little niches for the small operator. You're selling romance, after all.

    G'luck
    What you've described is the kind of research I would really love to do! I think a smaller boat (40-50ft) is going to work better for my story--and I'm glad you mentioned that bit about the cooking, as the food will be important. Thanks so much for all your help and support!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbchicoine View Post
    Doh!!
    You still got that veranda?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    There was a period in the 1950s and early 1960s when centerboard yawls were doing very well racing under the CCA rule. A pretty common size was around 40 feet, with about 4 feet of draft with the board up. You would only need the skipper and cook, no more crew than that.

    Here's an example: http://www.davidjonesclassics.com/sa...0-yawl-110000/



    The type is historic. From the site:

    She is one of eleven S&S Nevins-40 “Type A”yawls built by Nevins.S&S modeled the series after Carlton Mitchell’s Finisterre,the only three time winner,(1954,56,58)of the Bermuda Race-considered by some as the perfect combination of fast racer and comfortable cruiser.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    I was going to suggest a Newick trimaran, (maybe an ex OSTAR winner) with a keen multihull charterer.

    Hard to believe these days, but back in the late 1970's many charterers came on board expecting to eat corned beef from tins, even on a 70ft charter boat. Fortunately the skipper of the boat I crewed on used to run a restaurant, so the food was first class

    RW

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    I don't know the Gulf weather at all but since it's over 800 nautical miles New Orleans to Grand Cayman if you go without hugging the coast, time may become an issue. But the fun of playing with charts and historical weather logs could make plotting great fun.

    G'luck

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    There was a period in the 1950s and early 1960s when centerboard yawls were doing very well racing under the CCA rule. A pretty common size was around 40 feet, with about 4 feet of draft with the board up. You would only need the skipper and cook, no more crew than that.

    Here's an example: http://www.davidjonesclassics.com/sa...0-yawl-110000/



    The type is historic. From the site:
    Hello John! This Yawl actually looks like a good candidate! I will have to do some serious research on the maximum draft for New Orleans' waters (or drafts in general--I really am appallingly ignorant to all that). Thank you so much for including the link.

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    I was going to suggest a Newick trimaran, (maybe an ex OSTAR winner) with a keen multihull charterer.

    Hard to believe these days, but back in the late 1970's many charterers came on board expecting to eat corned beef from tins, even on a 70ft charter boat. Fortunately the skipper of the boat I crewed on used to run a restaurant, so the food was first class

    RW
    Very cool! Where did you charter out of? Where was your restaurant?

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    I don't know the Gulf weather at all but since it's over 800 nautical miles New Orleans to Grand Cayman if you go without hugging the coast, time may become an issue. But the fun of playing with charts and historical weather logs could make plotting great fun.

    G'luck
    Okay, now you are tempting me to keep you on file for the person to ask about maps and charts! I am seriously toying with some Cuban detour. I think maybe (now I'm making stuff up as I go along) the guest passenger wants some cigars. And my skipper is just that daring. Oh, the plot thickens!

    If I'm not detaining you too long, might I ask (not that I can't research it on my own, but since you're here...), if they were sailing straight to Grand Cayman, how long might that take with smooth sailing?

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Most of the 12T to 15T boats built to the CCA rule - and these are among the finest clutch of boats ever - were made after the era of paid crews - and the common layout is for long shore cruising/racing with sort of ok sea berths often convertables in the saloon, deliberate lack of privacy and so on. Boats on the small side here, like the Concordia yawl, are a bit close for most term charters with paid captain and crew, though there are couples who have done it. A nicer size for the couple or single person running a charter boat is up to or a bit under 20T, giving room for separate cabins and no intruding into the saloon for sleep.

    All the way around the Gulf and around is thin water. A boat that draws more than four or four and a half feet (board up if a board) will be limited in the range and pleasure. Or for exotic really shallow draft, check one of the larger of Monroe's "Presto" types, "Micco" perhaps. Or some of Spaulding Dunbar's cool larger centerboarders, the queen of which, "Ocean Queen" is featured in the current WoodenBoat.

    Or what I'm building - LFH's "Golden Ball".

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    A bareboat is just that - only the charterers, no captain or crew. And very few would bare boat a 60+ foot vessel anyway.
    A bareboat charter means that the boat is chartered to the charterer without an owner supplied captain and crew. The charter boat owner can, and often does, require the charter party to hire their own captain and crew, especially on larger boats. Back in the mid '80s I ran a 78' schooner under bare boat rules because she wasn't licensed to carry passengers. It made no sense to turn this boat loose to a charter party that didn't know her well. Her owner had a list of qualified skippers. When the charter papers were signed, the owner would point to my name on that list and say that he knew I was available and could supply my own crew. Under bare boat rules, it is only required that the boat owner relinquish all control of the boat while she is on charter. He cannot even be aboard. During the charter, my boss was the charterer, not the boat owner. My crew and I were "technically" paid by the charterer.

    My boat was a 78' stays'l schooner. I regularly sailed her with a mate, deckhand, and a cook (usually a second deckhand also). The cook also worked the deck. The boat's owner also owned a pair of 65' stays'l schooners. They were sailed with skipper, mate, and cook. I later sailed a 65' schooner that mostly did half day charters. No cook was needed and it was just me and a mate. If needed, a cook/steward(ess) was added. In my younger days I could single hand the 65 footers. The stays'l schooner rig is excellent for short handed sailing and chartering...she can be sailed with minimal crew, but if the pepes wanna help there is enough to do to keep them amused.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Most of the 12T to 15T boats built to the CCA rule - and these are among the finest clutch of boats ever - were made after the era of paid crews - and the common layout is for long shore cruising/racing with sort of ok sea berths often convertables in the saloon, deliberate lack of privacy and so on. Boats on the small side here, like the Concordia yawl, are a bit close for most term charters with paid captain and crew, though there are couples who have done it. A nicer size for the couple or single person running a charter boat is up to or a bit under 20T, giving room for separate cabins and no intruding into the saloon for sleep.

    All the way around the Gulf and around is thin water. A boat that draws more than four or four and a half feet (board up if a board) will be limited in the range and pleasure. Or for exotic really shallow draft, check one of the larger of Monroe's "Presto" types, "Micco" perhaps. Or some of Spaulding Dunbar's cool larger centerboarders, the queen of which, "Ocean Queen" is featured in the current WoodenBoat.

    Or what I'm building - LFH's "Golden Ball".
    Okay, I'm going to reveal my utter ignorance here--what do the terms 12T, 15T, and 20T refer to? And where to I get to see a picture of the Golden Ball? and here's another silly question: I like the term "thin water," but what does it mean?

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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by SchoonerRat View Post
    A bareboat charter means that the boat is chartered to the charterer without an owner supplied captain and crew. The charter boat owner can, and often does, require the charter party to hire their own captain and crew, especially on larger boats. Back in the mid '80s I ran a 78' schooner under bare boat rules because she wasn't licensed to carry passengers. It made no sense to turn this boat loose to a charter party that didn't know her well. Her owner had a list of qualified skippers. When the charter papers were signed, the owner would point to my name on that list and say that he knew I was available and could supply my own crew. Under bare boat rules, it is only required that the boat owner relinquish all control of the boat while she is on charter. He cannot even be aboard. During the charter, my boss was the charterer, not the boat owner. My crew and I were "technically" paid by the charterer.

    My boat was a 78' stays'l schooner. I regularly sailed her with a mate, deckhand, and a cook (usually a second deckhand also). The cook also worked the deck. The boat's owner also owned a pair of 65' stays'l schooners. They were sailed with skipper, mate, and cook. I later sailed a 65' schooner that mostly did half day charters. No cook was needed and it was just me and a mate. If needed, a cook/steward(ess) was added. In my younger days I could single hand the 65 footers. The stays'l schooner rig is excellent for short handed sailing and chartering...she can be sailed with minimal crew, but if the pepes wanna help there is enough to do to keep them amused.
    Thank you for clarifying the whole charter thing! I might have been using the term incorrectly for what I've been envisioning. Do you know if there's a specific term for an arrangement where someone hires a boat, owned by the captain, to transport them from one port to another, say from New Orleans to Grand Cayman? It is not intrinsic to the plot that the captain's family owns the boat, though it would seem more likely given her age (25 or so), which is important to the plot.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbchicoine View Post
    Okay, I'm going to reveal my utter ignorance here--what do the terms 12T, 15T, and 20T refer to? And where to I get to see a picture of the Golden Ball? and here's another silly question: I like the term "thin water," but what does it mean?
    Google is your friend.


    Thin water is what you get on lagoons and bays when the tide goes out, big areas of shallow water.

    I'm guessing that Ian's 15T or 20T refers to tonnage, which is a measure of internal volume where 1 ton is 100cubic foot, the volume of a mediaeval wine tun.

    I am willing to stand corrected as even though Her Indoors don't believe me I am not very psychic.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  34. #34
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    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbchicoine View Post
    Thank you for clarifying the whole charter thing! I might have been using the term incorrectly for what I've been envisioning. Do you know if there's a specific term for an arrangement where someone hires a boat, owned by the captain, to transport them from one port to another, say from New Orleans to Grand Cayman? It is not intrinsic to the plot that the captain's family owns the boat, though it would seem more likely given her age (25 or so), which is important to the plot.
    You are thinking of Skippered charter.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  35. #35

    Default Re: Need a Sailboat for a Work of Fiction

    Just call it a "skippered charter"

    I am in a marina just east of Houston right now and heading towards NO (where my wife used to live). The water is real shallow (or thin)! and very little tide, but water levels vary according to weather rather than the moon. So last night the water was nearly 2ft higher than normal

    I sailed the whole length of the north coast of Cuba a few years ago, not sure what the position was in 84 for US boats sailing there, I think the "trading with the enemy" rules were ignored until the mid 90's. Certainly boats raced there and Cubans have always welcomed visitors

    10,15,20T refers to tonnage, which has nothing to do with the weight of the boat, more its carrying capacity and to an archaic method used to handicap yachts

    RW

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