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Thread: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

  1. #176
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pohnpei, Micronesia and Michigan, USA
    Posts
    782

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    29871617_1340315696068351_7117982395688558128_o.jpgA true to form sail and oar boat on the beach, Strait of Magellan. Is she the best rowing boat I have ever owned? Not by a long shot, however this said I have done 25 mile days at the oars and am no worse for wear. This tiny boat will sail in almost undetectable wind and as an engineless craft the oars are rarely needed.

  2. #177
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Vancouver BC Canada
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    926

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    Very Cool and pretty Scamp. I like the yawl rig. I was just reading about your trip too. Bravo!

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,691

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    A true to form sail and oar boat on the beach, Strait of Magellan. Is she the best rowing boat I have ever owned? Not by a long shot, however this said I have done 25 mile days at the oars and am no worse for wear. This tiny boat will sail in almost undetectable wind and as an engineless craft the oars are rarely needed.
    While "sail and oar" may be an accurate description of Southern Cross, somehow it seems entirely inadequate for such a capable little boat.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #179
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
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    7,463

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    There is some disagreement on what makes a boat "sail and oar". I think everyone agrees that it has no motor whatsoever. My own (biased) definition then includes:

    1) Able to carry enough supplies for a week of solo camping, preferably able to camp aboard.

    2) Light and lean enough to be a pleasure to row for 10 to 20 miles a day.

    2) Plus, it has some kind of sail.

    Please state your own definitions.

    Rick
    I've designed a number of "Sail and Oar" boats, some intended for daysailing and maybe a few hours along the coast in sheltered waters, some for island hopping ( the Maine Island Trail) and one for some serious long range cruising. Some are intended for sleeping aboard, some not.
    I categorise them as 50/50 that is equally able under either, which means that they're not going to be the best at rowing or indeed under sail. Some are intended to row really well with sail auxiliary power if the conditions are right, and some are smart and capable sailers with "2 oarspower auxiliary " capability for short distances. A short distance for this purpose being a couple of hours at 3 1/2 knots or so.

    I've designed one for myself which has proven to be very popular to those wishing to build a really capable sail and oar boat with capacity to carry up to half a ton of stores and equipment, with the stability and length to sail really well, set up to sleep on board, and to row somewhat better than the long range ocean crossing rowing boats, ( I've designed a couple of those as well so know the issues that face the designers of those)

    So the brief above is still a bit brief, there are many possibilities within that framework.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  5. #180
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NW Georgia
    Posts
    350

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    I've designed one for myself which has proven to be very popular to those wishing to build a really capable sail and oar boat with capacity to carry up to half a ton of stores and equipment, with the stability and length to sail really well, set up to sleep on board, and to row somewhat better than the long range ocean crossing rowing boats...

    So the brief above is still a bit brief, there are many possibilities within that framework.

    John Welsford
    I'm guessing this would this be Long Steps?

  6. #181
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    854

    Default Re: Definitions of "sail and oar" boat

    I saw a very old skötbåt the other day. Built in the 1860-ies. Some 21 or 22 feet long I think. The old sleek type with only 3 strakes per side. The first strake hewn to shape. Intended to be rowed long distances by two people. The idea immediately struck me that this would be a very good design for a 55/45 open oar and sail boat. For two persons out camping or a family on day trips. The only problems would be finding suitable planking stock and keeping the wide planks from cracking.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

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