Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 123 ... LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 131

Thread: PDRacer microcruiser

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    I, for one, am very interested in building a Gorfnik. Keep us updated!

    - Scott

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    2,042

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    >Now for length. I considered making the boat longer than 8 feet, perhaps 10 or even 12, goose size. I have a bad case of boat building bug (bbb) and a longer Gorfnik would certainly make for a faster boat. But the main objection to this is the cost in terms of stability due to the different length/width ratio.

    --- I do not understand this. From what I have read, increasing length for a given beam only makes a boat more stable. -- Wade

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    >Now for length. I considered making the boat longer than 8 feet, perhaps 10 or even 12, goose size. I have a bad case of boat building bug (bbb) and a longer Gorfnik would certainly make for a faster boat. But the main objection to this is the cost in terms of stability due to the different length/width ratio.

    --- I do not understand this. From what I have read, increasing length for a given beam only makes a boat more stable. -- Wade
    This was being discussed on the Yahoo microcruising group but I don't know what the final decision was.

    My thought about lengthening the Gorfnik type boat is that it should work and might make a better boat but when you drift away from the original Puddle Duck idea, there are probably better designs out there. Matt Layden's Paradox is 13' 10" long and I'm sure is a much more seaworthy boat. Every time I started trying to design a longer Gorfnik, I realize I would rather have a real Paradox (or some other design) if the little 8 foot microcruiser isn't enough.

    Jim Michalak's Robbsboat at 15 foot long is another sail-from-inside design I'd look at if I need a longer cruiser.

    Don't let that stop you though. These boats don't always have to make sense. I'll bet a 10 or 12 foot long floating box would (or could) have a lot of interior space for all kinds of protected water adventures. I like the little boat I designed myself more than any I have built or bought mainly because I made it myself. I'm sure it isn't perfect but it was designed for what I wanted it to do and it works for me. The Gorfnik was not my design but could become my new favorite if I ever get to try it.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    16,259

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    I one wants bigger there is the Trilobyte 16, or Bolger's 20 foot Superbrick.

    Trilobyte by Dave Zeigler


    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    I haven't heard back from Andre since his last trip but thought I'd get his plans out into the world in case anyone wants to copy his design.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/xq8edjhyol...02016.pdf?dl=0

    Still waiting for the garage to finish fixing the pickup truck before I can try mine out.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,585

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    It is what it is, and i would not bother to change it. There is the slightly bigger goose, and as you mentioned Michalaks Robbsboat but also the smaller IMB, which would even work for me on the big lake and way more capable than a box boat for its size. Once you have added the expense of a trailer, its hard to justify not going a bit larger once you get to something that is too awkward to get on the roof of a car.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,585

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    It is what it is, and i would not bother to change it. There is the slightly bigger goose, and as you mentioned Michalaks Robbsboat but also the smaller IMB, which would even work for me on the big lake and way more capable than a box boat for its size. Once you have added the expense of a trailer, its hard to justify not going a bit larger once you get to something that is too awkward to get on the roof of a car.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Hobart, Tasmania
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Thanks for the plans Brian. I have just gone 3D with my version which is a pretty close copy to Gorfnik. Alas winter has closed in on us here and things have slowed down to the point that epoxy does not feel happy kicking off. Definatly not a car topper even tho I constructed mine with 4mm for sides and deck Etc. With a 6mm bottom sheet. Great little machine its going to be with a form that only its mother could love. Has many of the qualities of my old Citroen 2CV !!

    John

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    It is what it is, and i would not bother to change it. There is the slightly bigger goose, and as you mentioned Michalaks Robbsboat but also the smaller IMB, which would even work for me on the big lake and way more capable than a box boat for its size. Once you have added the expense of a trailer, its hard to justify not going a bit larger once you get to something that is too awkward to get on the roof of a car.
    I don't know what mine weighs but the original one was around 500 pounds. I'm hoping to get it in a truck bed to transport it to and from the water. I'm sure two people can carry it and get it in a truck. I don't know yet if I can do it myself. This is past the car-topping size but, without making any more changes to Andre's design, it should fit in most truck beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by JDMH View Post
    Thanks for the plans Brian. I have just gone 3D with my version which is a pretty close copy to Gorfnik. Alas winter has closed in on us here and things have slowed down to the point that epoxy does not feel happy kicking off. Definatly not a car topper even tho I constructed mine with 4mm for sides and deck Etc. With a 6mm bottom sheet. Great little machine its going to be with a form that only its mother could love. Has many of the qualities of my old Citroen 2CV !!

    John
    I made mine out of thin plywood for everything but ended up doubling it in several places like the bottom and front deck. The rear deck got thin strips of wood to make it strong enough to walk on. It also looked nice, in my opinion, and I am tempted to make the whole deck like that if/when I build another one of these boats.

    I will use what I built this season (maybe more) and then decide if I want a nicer built Gorfnik type boat or go with another similar but larger one.

    I originally wanted to build a copy of Robert Manry's Tinkerbelle boat and might possibly be going back to see it again tomorrow but I really think I want something that can be controlled from inside protected from the weather and insects instead of just something I can sleep in.

    I'm tempted to rig up a trolling motor on mine since I don't have the right sail made yet. I've been trying to come up with a human powered way to move this thing while inside. A long stand up paddle or yuloh sculling oar should work but then you have to have the hatch open standing up. I've seen designs with "oarports" which might be possible if the Gorfnik cabin was full width. I'd have to climb in the boat to see if the air boxes would be in the way.



    Picture of Dockbox
    Not exactly the look I am after but there should be a good bit more space inside than the original Gorfnik.

    DOCKBOX, NANOSHANTY, 8' X 5.5', 300 POUNDS EMPTY
    Go ahead and laugh.
    Sleeps two. 5 hp max. Very protected water only.
    Nail and glue construction from two sheets of 1/4" plywood and four sheets of 3/8" plywood.
    Still has that protected water limitation and needs a trailer. I guess it depends on each individual person's needs and wants. I expect my Gorfnik copy to be enough boat for my own use. I don't expect mine to have a very long life considering the cheap materials I used but I consider it a full scale model before I build the "real" one.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  10. #45
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Niagara, ONT Canada
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Dreams View Post
    I've been trying to come up with a human powered way to move this thing while inside.
    Pedal powered sternwheeler!

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.W. Florida
    Posts
    4,434

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Dreams
    I've been trying to come up with a human powered way to move this thing while inside.
    Interesting article in the journal of the International Human Powered Vehicle Association about fin-power in boats:

    _Human_Power_ _vol.11,no.1_, free pdf, 3.5Mb

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Plyboy View Post
    Pedal powered sternwheeler!
    That or something similar was considered. Either a small paddle wheel could be built right into the center where ever would be comfortable to pedal. Something like a wide centerboard box. That would take up legroom for sleeping though.

    Another idea (inspired by Professor Little) might be to incorporate a paddle wheel into each air box either up front to pedal or further back to crank by hand. That last idea would be easy to try. There are holes (I only did one side for now) to hold and pivot the leeboards. A big paddlewheel or two hanging off the sides with the axle and crank coming through those holes would probably serve both as propulsion and steering. Could even go backwards or spin around. I'm not sure what the contraption would look like but it could work.

    Quote Originally Posted by sharpiefan View Post
    Interesting article in the journal of the International Human Powered Vehicle Association about fin-power in boats:

    _Human_Power_ _vol.11,no.1_, free pdf, 3.5Mb
    Great article. I thought about the fin drive before but never figured out exactly how it even works. That article should show me if I study it hard enough. I would eventually need to make some changes to the steering lines on my little boat to keep the lines and/or though holes from wearing out real fast but I could see something like this being an attachment or replacement for the rudder.

    I probably will try to build some version of this fin propulsion for this boat. Not before I get the thing wet but maybe before the full size sail and mast gets built. I have a too short, too small sail that I want to try before I either copy the one Andre uses or try something else.

    I hope a lot of people build this or some similar design of boat. Especially something simple like this starting from a PDRacer or other hull and add a little cabin and fish the controls inside. I keep looking at my first falling apart boat. It is/was a Summer Breeze boat. That thing could hold a good bit of weight and was pretty stable.


    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Here's an album with the Gorfnik plans as individual pages. Dropbox changed something and my links don't work anymore.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

    Edit: The above link to the PDF plans just worked for me.

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.W. Florida
    Posts
    4,434

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Dreams View Post
    Here's an album with the Gorfnik plans as individual pages. Dropbox changed something and my links don't work anymore.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

    Edit: The above link to the PDF plans just worked for me.
    I remember seeing an addendum to Thorne's photo instructions;
    here it is:

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin B.
    Re: Thorne's new and improved "how to post photos" instructions

    Great and wonderous Thorne, I just stumbled across your proper thread on posting images ! So I have copied my recent independent thread on Dropbox pic posting to the correct Thread and will delete my one.

    For those slightly misguided souls like me who use DROPBOX to store their images on-line, there is a well hidden problem in getting the pics to show on this Forum despite the excellent work by Thorne - thanks you Sir for your efforts !!

    For Dropbox you select your image, click on the 'Share' button then copy the file name which shows in the pop-up window. Go over to your draft of your Post and select the image button (small square with the minuscule tree in the centre just as per Thornes instructions); de-select the "Retrieve ....... box" per Thorne. Then 'paste' your file number into the URL box and CHANGE the www to dl (that's d small "ell" not number one - means an instruction to 'download). Click OK and wait a second or so and your image should reveal itself providing the usual criteria for the Forum is met e.g file type, file size, pixel width etc.

    If you need more help re Dropbox, do not ask me but see Dropbox Forum's Rich R. explanation as to why on 6 January 2016 "You're copying the link from the address bar in your browser, which is specific to your account. You need to create a share link to the image you wish to post. Once you have the link, change the "www" to "dl" and you can use it to post images on other sites."

    Cheers from Martin B. Mandurah, Western Australia

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  15. #50
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Niagara, ONT Canada
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Dreams View Post
    Either a small paddle wheel could be built right into the center where ever would be comfortable to pedal. Something like a wide centerboard box. That would take up legroom for sleeping though.
    You know what though, if you're gonna have a centerboard case anyway, is a 6" wide one much more trouble than a 1.5" wide one? Thinking you could have it for dual use, have a pad/insert to hold centerboard, pull it out and install paddle... maybe make use of width and have really funky centerboard, with a water tank in the bottom or something.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    2,042

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Would a paddle wheel be more or less or same efficiency as a yuloh, and if more or same efficiency, wouldn't a yuloh be less trouble? -- Wade

  17. #52
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Niagara, ONT Canada
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Wouldn't like to use a yuloh in rough weather, but I'd like being almost in the bottom of the boat in a recumbent cycling position, using my largest muscle groups, pedalling a central paddle wheel which negates most of the disadvantages of side wheels or stern wheels in rough weather, i.e. getting lifted out of water frequently.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    Would a paddle wheel be more or less or same efficiency as a yuloh, and if more or same efficiency, wouldn't a yuloh be less trouble? -- Wade
    I don't know the efficiency of either one but Andre (the original designer) had this to say:

    Gorfnik Yuloh woes
    I originally built a Yuloh support and a 10 foot Yuloh for Gorfnik. Didn't work very
    well. When I compared it to my Paradox Yuloh, I noted the angle wasn't the same.
    So I rebuilt it to the correct angle. Worked better, but still not quite right, and I
    mostly used it as a stand-up paddle. I eventually started carrying a stand-up paddle
    as well as the Yuloh. I used the Yuloh mostly as a pole, and finally had to admit the
    paddle seemed better at moving the boat.
    Before dismissing the Yuloh completely, I did bring my Paradox Yuloh on board,
    since that one really works well, figuring that maybe the Gorfnik Yuloh was simply
    too short.
    Well, the Paradox Yuloh does go much better, but is still inefficient on Gorfnik. The
    problem lies in the fact that the boat is so short that it wiggles left and right too
    much with the Yuloh's movement. I finally resorted to a test race, Yuloh to a buoy
    and back, and then stand-up paddle to the same buoy and back. Results: Yuloh, 12
    minutes, paddle 9 minutes. So I scrapped the Yuloh.
    Instead of the Yuloh, I now carry an 8 foot bamboo pole, which permits spreading
    the Sprit sail wider when running in light winds.
    If I were to build again, I would forget about the Yuloh. The stand-up paddle has
    proven perfect as a secondary means of propulsion, and can move the boat easily at
    1.5 knots. It is easy to correct direction with a J-Stroke as in a canoe, or also by
    setting a slight contrary angle on the rudder, controlled while standing just by
    reaching back to the tiller.

    To this Dave Bolduc (from microcruising.com) responds:
    I imagine this is the reason why Matt Layden went with a stand up paddle in his 9'
    ELUSION microcruiser instead of his usual Yuloh. Nonetheless, I still think you
    could use a yuloh with your boat but you've definitely got to get all the dimensions
    just right. For my Enigma 360 I made two more oars based on the original with
    slightly more curve and length, but neither was quite as good as the original. This
    tells me that the dimensions are rather specific for each boat and oarsman.

    Then, another member posted:
    Agree with Dave. My yuloh was made long and cut (twice) to length for best
    performance. I also had to move the pivot mount on the boat for comfort. My blade
    is still a bit long, but it works well while propelling the boat and works well as a
    push-pole in shallower waters.
    I'm not familiar with the boat you are building, but it looks very similar to a puddle
    duck, of which I've built three. And none of them would scull worth a darn and I
    ended up using standard oars for the best propulsion and control. Not sure that
    would work in your case.
    I would like a way to power this boat from inside when the wind isn't blowing. Standing up and paddling or using a yuloh should work but then you are exposed to the outside world instead of protected inside dry and hopefully insect free.

    The truck is out of the garage so I lost that excuse. I need to get a launch permit (which I can buy and print out online) to use it at the local small lake. I might try a local pond first but it wouldn't be as easy to get the boat to and from the truck and it is too small to try sailing.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    2,042

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    OK, sounds like a design limitation with the wiggle-issue (and no real keel to resist). -- Wade

  20. #55
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Niagara, ONT Canada
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Right, lack of lateral resistance and such. I'd speculate that even if you had a leeboard or centerboard down, if that was the only lateral resistance, it would tend to rotate about that still. Possibly some amendments in angles and size of blade would help it scale down better, but then you might get a really low transom to accomodate, or end up with the equivalent of wiggling a kitchen spatula with your arm over the transom.

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    I was instructed to leave the rudder sticking out flatter in the water instead of straight down when stand-up paddling. I guess this helps the boat track better. He didn't mention the leeboards. It is supposed to have one each side but I'm only putting one on my build. Either straight down or angled back, they might make a big difference in tracking.

    My other two homemade boats both had/have keel boards to help them track straight. They could both use deeper/longer keels but they work pretty good paddling.

    The ability to beach this boat and camp on dry land is a big benefit of this design so adding a single keel board wouldn't work. Two or three might be an option if needed.

    I've never REALLY sailed anything yet but I hope to use the wind most of the time. It would be nice to sit or lay down inside and pedal all over the lake. I'll have a better idea of how the thing paddles as soon as I get it to the water.

    Another suggestion Andre gave me for my first trip out was "Bring a lunch". I probably would have forgotten that.

    One thing I really want to do with this boat is star gaze. I've considered doing it just sitting in the yard but never did try it yet. With all the windows, I should be able to lay back at a comfortable angle and view a good piece of the sky while sealed up in a protective box. That way, if you fall asleep, you shouldn't get rained on, cold, or eaten by bugs or monsters.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

    P.S. I really want to try the flapping fin idea.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.W. Florida
    Posts
    4,434

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Bolger's SweetPea peapod has a removable "slipping" keel, adapted from English sailing barges; you might look at that. Dynamite Payson found it to work well for him. It's in _Instant_Boatbuilding_With_Dynamite_Payson_


    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by sharpiefan View Post
    Bolger's SweetPea peapod has a removable "slipping" keel, adapted from English sailing barges; you might look at that. Dynamite Payson found it to work well for him. It's in _Instant_Boatbuilding_With_Dynamite_Payson_

    I don't have that book yet but did some google searching and think I found what a "slipping" keel is.

    http://www.mcssl.com/content/assets/33/330110/Sweetpea-2.jpg


    Real big picture (not mine) so I didn't try to embed it into this post. I don't have the key to know what the numbers are showing but it looks like the keel can be removed as well as the rudder and mast to use it as a simple row boat.

    I wonder how hard it is to put on and take off the keel? Is it something you do after the boat is in the water?

    I might just be inventing problems that don't exist. This boat really might be just what I want with no real changes needed. Overnight trips are probably the most I'll get to do and I enjoy paddling as close to the edge of the water as I can where I can see the bottom more than racing across the lake. Might not matter if I use a paddle, a yuloh, or just a long stick to move me along.

    If and when I get a good sail and all the sailing bits and pieces done, I might want to do some longer trips like Andre gets to do but I can't easily leave for more than a day or so right now. I'm going to be happy if my boat floats without leaking and I can move it around on the water. I can worry about improving it on the next one.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.W. Florida
    Posts
    4,434

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    According to the build article, you pull the boat ashore to install/remove the keel. It is a bit like an upside-down daggerboard -- there are 2 tongues at opposite ends of the keel that slide into receivers; the tongues are held in place by fids through holes in them. With the keel out, there are caps for the receivers, and a small skeg you can put in the rear for good tracking while rowing. Your picture link is the Bolger Sweet Pea; #19 is the keel, #20 & #23 are the tongues. If you change the last part of the address in the window to Sweetpea-1.jpg, you can see a couple of photos & sail plan drawings.

    Could you mount your centerboard to the side like a bilgeboard to make room for the paddlewheel amidships?

    Or, outside-the-box time, have the centerboard removable so you can replace it with the paddlewheel, like those exercise bikes with fan blades on the wheel.

    Hope the voyage is a long one.
    May there be many a summer morning when,
    with what pleasure, what joy,
    you come into harbors seen for the first time...

    Ithaka, by Cavafy
    (Keeley - Sherrard translation)

  25. #60
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Port Elizabeth, South Africa
    Posts
    274

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    How suitable would a Hobie Mirage Drive be for leg propulsion?

    The tug-of-war demonstration videos (Mirage drive vs paddler) suggests good static thrust, so it should be able to move a fairly hefty boat at a moderate pace.

  26. #61
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Charleston, SC, USA
    Posts
    93

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Btw, there is another Yahoo group, PuddleDuck, in which Mr. Bourbeau and others regularly post about Gorfnik, this may be interesting to you also.

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    New PDR cruiser from Jerome Delaunay which will be a free down load


  28. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser


  29. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Free plans next week through Duckworks.


  30. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskeyfox View Post
    How suitable would a Hobie Mirage Drive be for leg propulsion?

    The tug-of-war demonstration videos (Mirage drive vs paddler) suggests good static thrust, so it should be able to move a fairly hefty boat at a moderate pace.
    I think a Mirage drive would work great and would use it if I had it. They are more $$$ than I can spend at this time. I'd like to at least try one out someday.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mattokun View Post
    Btw, there is another Yahoo group, PuddleDuck, in which Mr. Bourbeau and others regularly post about Gorfnik, this may be interesting to you also.
    Yes, there are other groups where Gorfnik was being talked about. Not much has been posted lately. I think Andre is out on one of his boats a lot more than he is at his computer right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    Free plans next week through Duckworks.

    Please post a link here when the plans are made available. I probably won't build one exactly like it but there are some features I'd like to study.

    I want to be able to use whatever design I end with in the rain and stay dry. I like the hard cabin on my Gorfnik copy but something like this new design with a removable soft "cabin" so you could at least sit up inside might be nice.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Cockpit cover for sleeping


  32. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Aquitaine
    Posts
    874

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    Would a paddle wheel be more or less or same efficiency as a yuloh, and if more or same efficiency, wouldn't a yuloh be less trouble? -- Wade
    Out in Asia, yulohs are common to move river boats. Paddle wheels are pretty ineficient and have virtually dissapeared, except for sentimental reasons. Even pedlos often have screw drives.

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser


  34. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,585

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Finding it hard to comprehend that after all the advances learned since man first straddled a log, that there has been so much interest and designs built on the basics of a wooden box! I am glad to see it, getting people building, getting afloat and sailing though.

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Aquitaine
    Posts
    874

    Default Re: PDRacer microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Finding it hard to comprehend that after all the advances learned since man first straddled a log, that there has been so much interest and designs built on the basics of a wooden box! I am glad to see it, getting people building, getting afloat and sailing though.
    Me too. Constructing a boat takes quite a bit of effort and some materials. But trying to do minimul does not tick my box. For very few more bux, one could have a boat, not a coffin. The PDR has merit, in the same way as the Optimist. But trying to cruise in one stretches the imagination.
    OK guys, convince me...
    A2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •