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Thread: Building a Welsford dinghy

  1. #141
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    12,297

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Iíve seen it. It looks like SOMEONE knew what they were doing. The next one will be FANTASTIC!

    And, in real life, it is the cutest little boat.

    Peace,
    Robert

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    908

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Winter has set in, here in the Valley. As T. S. Eliot once observed, the Summer nymphs have departed....



    The Winter inversion layer has set in, making for great working conditions: temps in the mid 50s to low 60s.

    Lots of life and the holidays have intervened since I last had anything to report. Christmas, followed by a frantic effort to clean the wife's sewing room and the living room to make way for her new sewing machine: an 18" long-arm machine so she can occupy her retirement sewing quilts.

    But now I can get back to working on the boat. I keep reminding myself that I'm logging the build, not looking good. I had painted the transoms, for and aft, and the upper side strakes, one coat. Upon examining what I had wrought, I had to face up to a hard truth. I have been too long in the build -- and the plywood side strakes have begun to check. So, reluctantly, I broke out the sander again, and took the top strakes back to wood. Today I had the chance to lay down a layer of epoxy to fill the surface.



    My original fantasy was to paint the outer hull white. Period. Now, however, I'm tempted to paint that lower rub-rail a nice nautical red. Who knows what I'll do when I get to doing the finish work. Now while the epoxy cures I can get on to the work of finishing the rudder and dagger board.

    It did feel good to be back working on the dinghy again. I'd been away far too long.
    "The future is already here ó it's just not very evenly distributed." William Gibson

  3. #143
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    908

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Finally -- another MAJOR milestone (at least in my playbook). I've spent the last month and more working on the top side panels. Gave them a coat of paint, only to see that what was required was to sand them back to wood and apply two coats of epoxy to fill the checking. (A problem caused by leaving the build to go on for two years.) Finally the epoxy cured and I was able to apply a second "first" coat of paint. Let that set. Sand that coat and apply a second coat. Upon examining my handiwork, I found that I had succeeded in contaminating the paint -- the second coat needed to be seriously sanded back to first coat. Drop back ten and repaint (and thin no more!) That coat looked almost acceptable. Almost. So sanding again with my soft sanders 220 grit. Final coat of one-part polyurethane paint, and the boat was looking good.

    Today I unwrapped the boat and removed all the blue tape. I'm sold on 3-M's blue tape. It doesn't allow paint to bleed under. One cautionary note, one I have learned early on and still ignore: don't leave the tape on too long -- it has an affinity for what it's stuck to, and doesn't like to have to leave.

    But now, finally, I can show off the top portion of the dinghy looking pretty much as I want it.



    and



    Next on my to-do list: clean up the number of small "oops" spots, and bring some "ignore 'cause I'm not sure how I want do deal with it" up to snuff. That should keep me occupied for a while. After that, it's turn the dinghy over, paint the bottom, and DONE!

    One point I need to revisit. The dinghy is my first build, and as such it is a wonderful learning experience. In the process of trying to figure out what I had done to the second coat of paint, I learned that using one-part polyurethane paint was not recommended for wooden boats: I can attest that painting with this paint is nothing more or less than painting plastic on the wood. And wood moves -- plastic doesn't. When I will need to repaint, I'll be using an oil-based enamel (recommended).
    "The future is already here ó it's just not very evenly distributed." William Gibson

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