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Thread: Building a Welsford dinghy

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    hey Bill, when you get ready to strike the line for the shear i might suggest a contrasting coloured batten so you can see what you're about more easily

    this may help you avoid hard spots on the line, or knot...

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    hey Bill, when you get ready to strike the line for the shear i might suggest a contrasting coloured batten so you can see what you're about more easily

    this may help you avoid hard spots on the line, or knot...

    sw
    Thanks for the tip. My long batten is one I cut last year from a load of #1 straight-grain (beautiful) douglas fir. In the past year it has taken on a lovely milk-chocolate hue. You're right -- even this little contrast makes sighting along the curve very easy. Somewhere in one of my many moves I have lost the acrylic batten that had come with my drafting ducks. Fortunately, I still have the ducks, so they make nudging the batten so very easy.

    We'll see how well I pick up the shear when I get to dry-fit the finished panels. (Should worst come to worst, I still have more 1/4" marine ply. I'm not afraid to consign a mistake to the scrap pile.)

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Bill, it is knot a scrap pile, it is a stack of material suitable for smaller parts/projects ��

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Well, here I am, a year older. The dinghy should have been finished by now. However, I still have no intention of bringing the bits and pieces to the boat builder and asking him to finish it for me.

    Hiatus is over. I almost typed "...for another year," but my dearly beloved is already scanning cruise offerings, looking lustfully at Viking's 145-day around the world cruise.

    So: what have I accomplished, what have I learned, and what lies ahead?

    I'll start with what I've learned:
    1.) I no longer tell people a fixed date when asked when the build will be complete.

    I have learned that the build is like stringing many beads together on a long string, each bead representing a finite and well-defined task which can be accomplished
    in a well-defined span of time, usually in a matter of hours, sometimes days, sometimes weeks. As for prognostications, the minimum unit of resolution I am comfortable
    with is a week. When working with epoxy or epoxy+fiberglass, I have learned to start the day with a bead-size of about 1 m of filled fillet per batch. As the day
    progresses, the bead size must shrink: yesterday, at 1400 hr, the temperature in the shade passed the 36 degree mark. I was able to continue working for yet
    another hour, but very quickly with small batches.

    2.) I no longer fear the task of fitting the side-panels to the needed curve.

    I can't tell you how much time I lost dreading this task -- something I had only read about, and assumed it ranked with black magic.

    3.) I am acquiring a modicum of skill in the use of a 2 cm tongue depressor when laying in a fillet of epoxy filled with high-density filler. I find that being quasi-ambidextrous
    also is a very handy ability.

    What have I accomplished?

    At this point, I have cut out the blanks for marking the rough-cuts for the top-most side panels. Form-fitting will come next. However, in the process of laying these blanks on the hull, I realized that reaching over the top of these planks to get at the bottom would be a bit of a reach -- possible, but not comfortable. Thus, the dinghy (as pictured in my last posting) is now without the top panel blanks.

    Prior to leaving on vacation, I had laid a fillet and taped the two longitudinal seams on both port and starboard sides from stem to stern. I returned from hiatus on Sunday. Yesterday, I set myself the task of laying fillets and taping the forward bays of the hull: ie. taping the frames to side panels, frames to bottom panels, taping spine to bottom panel and connections between spine, transom and frames. A lot of little detail work.

    Today I laid fillets and taped the connections between Frame #2 and the lower side panels and bottom, Frame #3 and the lower side panels and bottom (both sides), and the small bays between Frame #3, the aft spine and the stern transom. Tomorrow I will cut, grind and sand what I have wrought in preparing to put down the fairing layer which will happen (I think I hear God laughing) Thursday, Friday and or Saturday. No pictures until I am happy with how the fairing work looks.

    While not necessarily needed, I am following a practice suggested by epoxy-boy: I wet the connection to be taped with straight epoxy; I lay down the filled epoxy fillet, I then lay the fiberglass tape wet-on-wet on top of the fillet, and then, finally, wet the tape out with an overlay of straight epoxy. Much bending over, much detail work bending over. I am developing excellent upper-body strength.

    Once I reach this point in the build, I will paint the bottoms and sides of what will become enclosed by the coverings JW has designed for the dinghy. (I write this without visually examining the hull: this painting will need to be done soonest, but may need to be put off until the top-most side panels have been placed.)


    What remains to be done?

    Many (uncountably many) beads yet to place on the string. After the work on the hull bottom, I will rough-cut the top panels for final fitting and attachment. This will be followed by more fillets and taping until the interior of the hull has been completely taped.

    After the interior hull has been finished, I will begin work building a steam box. I mentioned in an earlier post my current fantasy of tarting the girl up a bit. I'd like the gunwale, inwale and mounting blocks to all be of maple, finished bright. While I recognize the need to "Tom Sawyer" an amigo to help with the task, I think that steaming the wales will make the work go just that much easier.

    Once the shear has been properly dressed, I'll be able to free the girl from the building jig and continue onward from there.

    When will I be done with the build? I'm hoping to have it done in time for the next family reunion at Lake Almanor. It will certainly be finished when it is soup.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Lookin' good!

    Amazing how much work even a small boat can be. I can now relate to the "no fixed end date", but before I could I made the mistake of asking someone else about theirs. My boat was started in May, was supposed to have been done by mid-summer. I keep getting interrupted by work-related travel and mundane things like laundry, mowing the lawn, dog training and preserving all the veggies my garden is offering up. Between it all I'm still going at 'er as much as I can but I haven't even cracked the lid on the epoxy containers yet. Not looking forward to the bending over exercise, did enough of that for the stitching.

    Finally, she's far enough along though that every time I open the shed door I get the "oohh, ahhh" moments. Once those side panels are finished I think yours will be in that stage too.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    (I think I hear God laughing)
    Stepped out onto the patio to see clouds, the looks of which I didn't like. Back inside to check the weather forecast. The Weather-guessers agreed with me. Back outside to tarp the boat. Am hearing the scattered patter of ghost drops here and there. Nothing like solid rain, not even showerish. Just a drop here and there. So I uncover that portion of the hull I want to work on. Hear more drops, cover again.

    At this point, the hull is sealed and will behave like a bath tube if left uncovered during a good rain. Not a good thing.

    During this pause, I have reconsidered my immediate future work plan. While I still have the top-side panels off, I think I want to finish and mount the inside decking Welsford has drawn up. It will be much easier to draw up the template now than it will be later; the same goes for the mounting of said decks.

    I see evidence of much laughter from above: rays of sunlight striking the patio while rain clouds float by menacingly. Oh well. Life goes on.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Great build and philosophy. It will be finished when you are satisfied that it is finished, and not one moment before.

    Boatbuilding is one of life's great journeys for the amateur. Sometimes I think that our boats own us not the other way around.

    Graeme

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Thanks, Graeme

    I've seen a sign-off on the forum "I was born on the wooden boat that I built." I definitely feel as though I'm being born again, or at the very least, further refined. I may yet at some future time arrive at a modicum of wisdom. One hopes.

    And I may even take a day off tomorrow -- life here at Bent Manor requires my attention from time to time.

    Bill

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    You're doing well Bill, and I suspect that you can by now appreciate what I mean when I say, " by the time you've finished your boat, you'll have all the skills that you wished you had when you started".

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    You're doing well Bill, and I suspect that you can by now appreciate what I mean when I say, " by the time you've finished your boat, you'll have all the skills that you wished you had when you started".

    John Welsford
    Thanks for your kind words. It's a much nicer way of putting that which some friends say: "so you're making your mistakes on your life boat." But when I look back over the entirety of the build, yes, I can see how far I've come. And, as the saying goes, how "what I don't know that I don't know" is still waiting to bite me. Blithely, we go on.

    Bill

  11. #46

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    so... when is it done?

    That is a joke Bill. Enjoy the process and the product will love you back.

    I found that a good workplace is essential for building a boat. Many hours are spent in it. Even more by the boat being built. From cutting and fitting to painting... My first workplace looked like yours.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Quote Originally Posted by Rik van der Vaart View Post
    Enjoy the process and the product will love you back.
    Yes!

    I have found on my two (so far) boat building projects that I loved the process at least as much (if not more) than the finished product. Perhaps it's like raising children: enjoy them while they are young. Of course I don't have children, but I've heard the sentiment expressed by many a parent.

    --Mike
    “It doesn’t matter how slowly you go -- so long as you do not stop.”
    -Confucius

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Finally I am back to the build.

    Summer vacation began 8/16 when we flew non-stop San Francisco to Frankfurt. Our flight was delayed an hour getting out of S.F., so we missed our connection to Amsterdam. We spent the (next?) day being routed to Amsterdam via Munich. Slept a day, toured Amsterdam for a day, then spent two weeks cruising to Budapest. After a night of no sleep, we were routed back to Frankfurt, and on to S.F. Home for 4 days, then back to S.F. to board a cruise ship bound for Alaska for 10 days. Home for a few days, then on 9/25 we hitched a trailer onto the back of our truck (SUV?) and towed our God-Daughter's super beetle to San Antonio where she's currently #1 in her C-School class in the Navy. Five days there, visit for a day and a half, drive to Dallas to visit friends we met on the river cruise, then drive 5 days back home. We arrived just after noon on Friday. Three hours later I was on the road, driving to Bakersfield where I over-nighted en-route to Vista/Escondido (Brother-in-law, and then cousin) where my cousin wanted to paint my portrait Saturday evening. Visited with Brother-in-law and family Sunday, then back home Monday/Tuesday.

    Wednesday was a honey-do day, as was this morning. This afternoon, I took the wraps off the dinghy (didn't trust the weather while I was away) and proceeded to mark and shape the two more pieces I'll need for the template for the fore-deck. Weather guessers are promising us rain tomorrow -- today's clouds tell me they're correct. Just don't know what time the rain will come. I may have enough time in the morning to begin roughing out the fore-deck. Between other obligations and the weather, the weekend will be a waste.

    But being back home, creating more sawdust, all I can say is "Oh what a feeling!" It's good to be home and back at work.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I seem to recall having posted something to the effect of "no more pictures" until I had made the taped seams look pretty. That was when I expected to begin that task the following day. As is the way of boat building, other tasks have interposed themselves on my agenda. And besides, the point of this thread is to document the building of the dinghy, not to look good.

    When all is said and done, the dinghy will be a "first build" project. I see no point in overloading a pig with lipstick -- but I still intend to make it look (at least from a distance) presentable. I was all set to work up the fore-deck when I remembered that this was supposed to be a sailing dinghy. I still hadn't mounted the mast step. So now, here it is:



    Over the course of the build, I find that I am acquiring some modicum of skill. Here I expose the work (beneath the mast step) that I had done a year ago. Not pretty, a bit messy, but the dinghy should still float, regardless. When she is finished, will I be proud of the little darling? Perhaps modestly proud. What I am proud of, however, is the bit of skill and woodworking wisdom which I have acquired over the build. Having begun in the school of measure once, cut twice (in my case, thrice), I have progressed to where I was able to cut the fore-deck from a single piece of ply, and have it fit 5 ways, mostly tight and nice.

    I had formed two-part skeletal templates to capture the curve at both sides, as well as a single bit of off-cut to capture the cuts for the stem and daggerboard trunk. After a gazillion measurements taken from a brazillian different data points, I was able to trace these lines onto heavy matte board, which I then cut out and fit onto the boat. It fit! The plywood copy dropped into place quite nicely. (This was before I had mounted the mast step.) I measured the location of the clearance for the step (twice),
    and transferred its center to the plywood deck. I allowed a 1/4" clearance (on the diameter), which was a Good Thing, because somehow the fore-and-aft dimension I had transferred was 1/8" off. The fore-deck still fits very nicely, thank you very much.



    I can't get it out of my mind: "Me and my arrow..." I've painted the fore-peak under-deck stowage a high-gloss white. This picture shows how dark that area is -- when we moved into our current house, the first thing we did was paint all of the cabinets white inside. It's amazing how much this improved visibility. Tomorrow I begin painting the aft stowage white as well. Then I go to work dressing the pig's lipstick. I'm still amazed at how much a very thick "peanut butter" mix of fairing compound can slump. Oh well, just more things to learn. Excelsior is not just shredded wood....
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:07 AM.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I've been playing hide-and-seek with rain showers for the past week. We really need the rain, so I'm not complaining. On Friday, we got 45 mm of rain. The night before I had hurriedly put up a tarp to keep the rain out of the dinghy. That morning, it began to rain before I got out of bed, and by the time I was up, large ponds of water were accumulating in the tarp above the boat. I put on a coat and went out to try to reinforce the tarp with off-cuts of plywood I had stashed under the build table. It was totally frustrating until I realized that if I wasn't willing to spend an hour in the rain, I probably shouldn't think that I might like to go cruising. Once I accepted the idea of getting totally drenched, the work went a lot more easily.

    I've finally finished layering all the seams and connections with fairing compound. I was finishing some sanding this morning when a bee settled upon the structure I had erected to support the tarp I use to keep the rain out of the dinghy. Last Thursday while applying the fairing compound in another bay, I found I needed to vacuum up a dead bee. At the time, I gave it no thought. This morning, however, in seeing the second bee, I became curious. From the support structure above the hull, the bee flew straight down into the bay just forward of where I was working and onto the bottom panel. I had already sanded these seams smooth, when the bee crawled onto the smoothed fairing compound. The bee crawled across the joint and up the smoothed compound on the first side panel. The bee had reached the line where the fairing compound ended and had actually place two feet onto the plywood surface when it fell backward, wings fluttering ineffectually as it rolled down over the joint to end on the horizontal strip of fairing compound.



    The bee attempted twice more to crawl up onto the connecting side panel with the same result. The bee was behaving as though it were inebriated. The bee then got itself upright and just stayed in position, not attempting to move at all. Twenty minutes passed while I was sanding. When I looked next, the bee had moved about three inches over the seam, but was still stationary on the angled side of the fairing compound. I went in to have lunch with the wife, and when I returned, I found the bee had actually moved itself onto the plywood bottom panel, one inch from the edge of the fairing compound strip. I managed to pick the bee up on a film of epoxy I had pulled from an epoxy pot, and placed the bee on the ground away from the dinghy. For many minutes the bee seemed incapacitated. A half hour later, I looked for the bee and found no trace of the bee. I'd like to think the bee had sobered up.

    So, the sanding of the fairing compound is almost finished. I have painted primer on the frame and spine where the fore-deck will occlude the surface once it's put in place. Tomorrow I'll begin finish-painting these surfaces. The weather forecast looks promising, so I may be able to glue the fore-deck in place by the end of the week.
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:08 AM.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I'll bet that bee got a drubbing when he got back to the hive for being under the influence while on the job!

    Lovely story! I am enjoying your build.

    Graeme

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    This has been a week of small tasks in preparation for reaching another milestone. Today I'm grateful that there's no better ventilation than outdoors. The weather this week has been very cooperative -- blue skies wall to wall. Some clouds blowing in, but a pleasant breeze in the back yard. I have laid down the third coat of paint on those surfaces the fore-deck will occlude. The last coat is still drying. While I waiting, I pulled out the unfinished dagger board. It is nearly complete, but the edges need to be glassed, so I taped the trailing edge, and left the epoxy to cure. While the epoxy was curing, I pulled out the maple cheek plates for the rudder and stained them. They are now a wonderful honey-colored maple.

    So now, everything is drying and/or curing in the back yard. Later this afternoon I'll mark and drill pilot holes for mounting the forward hatch covers. In the mean time, I'm wrestling with how to finish the rudder. As stated, the cheek plates have been stained; moving forward, they will be varnished. The rudder blade itself, however, will be painted with one-part polyurethane paint. (All surfaces will be white except for the maple trim.) My question now is how will I paint the rudder blade white while keeping the paint away from the surface on which the cheek plates will be mounted. At the moment, I'm favoring masking the line (a curve) with rubber cement. The blade has already been glassed (but again, the edges need to be glassed yet). Fortunately this is not a decision I need to make for a while. For now, I'm going to go back out into the sunlight and savor the aromas of polyurethane, epoxy and oil. Tomorrow morning I'll epoxy the fore-deck into place. That's the milestone for the week.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    what about cutting large discs of plastic from the sides of 1-gal milk jugs

    one for each side of the blade between the blade & the cheeks

    they would act as a bushing & keep the parts from rubbing against each other

    just a ponderment...

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Thanks for the suggestion, Steve.

    While I won't need a bushing in this case (the cheek plates will be permanently fixed to the blade), the plastic can serve as a paint mask. The design doesn't call for a swing blade; or a swinging dagger board, either.

    Bill

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    It's Sunday, day two of the weekend. The fore-deck is currently undergoing its epoxy attachment to the hull.







    I've traced its outline in plain epoxy -- once it's dried (soon) I'll fill the seam with adhesive-filled epoxy. and when that's dried, I'll lay down the fairing fillet to make it look good.

    In an earlier post I had indicated that I would paint the interior of the forward hatch white to aid visibility in a dark hole. It does seem to help.



    See? It's not a black hole. Well, not quite.

    While waiting for the epoxy to dry, I went back to my "opportunity pile" (mistakes and off-cuts), to whip out a more reasonable structure to support the tarpaulin covering the dinghy in the rains. So this is what I came up with -- it may require a couple of additions, but the basic idea (I'd like to think) is sound.



    I've trimmed the laterals with the expectation that I'll have the last of the side panels up and in place before the next rains. So far, the weather guessers are telling me I'll have the time. So it's now time to fill the seam with adhesive epoxy. Work, like life, trundles onward.
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:13 AM.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Waiting for epoxy to cure so I can remove some screws prior to applying more filled epoxy to the joint between the topside panel and the forward transom. (Port side) So have some pictures:



    Here's the fore-deck epoxied, taped and faired to the hull.

    Now I have the topside panel clamped and screwed in place. The picture shows it clamped prior to being glued up. The clamps are currently off the girl, and the panel is now in the process of being proper integrated into the hull structure.



    Time for another note in the truth in building category. While I chose not to sister the frame at the #2 position when placing the middle panel (see above lamentation), I did want the topside panels to show a fair curve along the upper edge. To accomplish this, I did choose to sister the frame for that panel. The staub of wood sticking up above the edge is a cleat of convenience that I attached to the other side of the frame while its sister cured in place. The cleat is what I have screwed the panel into at that position. The line of the shear is now very fair to my eye -- after the pic was taken I took the panel down for final trimming, eliminating the slight hogging the critical eye might notice up near the bow.

    For the top panels, I'm going to work with all deliberate haste, applying fillet, tape and fairing at all intersections one bay at a time. Speaking of time, it is time for me to do exactly this to the first (forward portside) bay.
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:15 AM.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I have begun the business of laying up the last of the side panels. I should have the hull ready for the gunwale structure by the end of Thanksgiving weekend. A major milestone in sight now.

    I have gained a greater appreciation for JW's sense of humor.

    Bill

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Steady progress and looking very good.

    Graeme

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    The weather and a cold have slowed things down a bit. Sunny this morning, so I was able to finish laying in the last of the fillets and taping. With the temperature in the high 50s, it will take most of the day to cure, with rain in the forecast for tonight or tomorrow.

    I have struck the sheer line on the port side, and have yet to do the same for the starboard. Then it'll be time to take the surform tool to the edges once more. Another milestone approaching.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    So I stopped for a small side trip. Actually a necessary regrouping of priorities. I need the after deck before I get too far ahead of myself. Yesterday I took off the curve of the after portion of the hull, both sides. Cut the stiff matte boards to good fits on each side. Then proceeded to compliment myself on how well I had done up the fore deck, and how I could just take these two side pieces and some accurate measurements and dispense with the full-size template (my matte board wasn't that large, anyway).

    Full of myself, I followed my line of thought and cut out the shape -- side curves and transom line -- of the after deck from what remained in the plywood after the fore deck had been cut. Once in place, I realized that all I had done was to make a full-sized template in plywood, not matte board. I could have chosen to glass-in the gaps that had appeared, and was willing to settle for that as a last-resort option, but thought I could still improve upon what I had. So with template in place, I took my trusty tape and marked the gap size at about 6 to 8 places along each side. Taking this markup back to the sheet of ply, I found that I did not have enough ply left to mark out a new deck square to the panel. That was OK, however, because the greatest width of the deck exceeded the 4 ft. width of the panel anyway. So I set the template askew on the remaining ply, and traced it; then added in the extra needed as noted on each side. Cut the new deck: I needed to ease one of the slots to accommodate a rib, and then just forward of that I had to take a few passes with the surform tool; but the new deck fits the hull perfectly.

    That was yesterday. This morning, somewhat chastened, I spent an hour or so exploring various permutations of error while trying to strike the artful curve at the front of the deck. I finally found the line that satisfied all the measurements, and now the deck is finally cut to shape. Some of the chastening that occurred last night came from visiting Christine deMerchant's SCAMP build thread here on the forum. She's putting together thrice the boat I am, doing it in half the time, and making it look so damned easy. Then, after a suitable period of auto-flagellation, I came to realize that this was not the first boat she built; that she has a beautiful, well-laid out shop, with more toys than I have, and that there was a time when she, too, was building her first boat. Not only that, but each first boat is different. So, I can stop with the hair shirt and get on with my work here. But not without learning a few tricks from her thread, though. It's well worth a visit.

    The after deck now has its underside primer coat of paint on, preparatory to attaching to the boat, and the dinghy is now wrapped up again waiting for the rain. I expect to see more wet tonight, or in the morning. So far the work is progressing roughly along the timeline I had set for the next few weeks. While it rains I can try to apply a few tricks I had picked up elsewhere on the forum as I finish glassing the dagger board and rudder. By Monday the weather should be good for working on the hull again.

    More pictures soon.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    The adventure continues. We've all been down the deadends of boatbuilding and it chastens us to keep to the first commandment: measure twice (well perhaps three times) and cut once!

    Progress continues well and a fine vessel is emerging.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    For laying out those tricky areas, ever use a jogglestick? That has helped me in a few areas that have complex curves. I have to give credit to John Welsford. He's the one that got me using that maneuver a few years ago.

    Travis.
    Last edited by Zuri; 11-26-2016 at 01:28 AM.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    The after-deck is trimmed to fit and painted beneath (except for the glue lines). The after bay is painted and hatches installed. As I mentioned regarding the forepeak, I'm painting the interior of these closed spaces white to improve visibility should one need to peer inside. I plan on gluing the deck in place in the morning. Photos both before and after (should I remember). I'll go out on a limb here. Photos tomorrow.

    Once the deck is placed, there's the finish work of laying fairing compound on the taped seams, and sanding, sanding, sanding. Then on to removing the last two screws holding the dinghy to the jig, filling screw holes, and painting the interior. Sometime in 7 to 14 days I expect delivery of a couple of flush-cutting jigsaw blades: these I need to trim back the tops of the frames to accommodate the blocks that support the in-wale. It's frustrating to have to wait so long, but there's still more work to be done before this work is needed. I've a steam box to build and gunwale strakes to cut and shape. Not to mention the blocks themselves, which I'll need to cut. So close, yet so much yet to do. Onward, ever onward....

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    dfw
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    1,012

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    have you considered weighting the strips that will become your wales?

    i did this for my Portuguese Dinghy build and it worked quite well

    also did it for the chines on my friend's PDR

    no need for steam

    i just suspended the pieces between 2 ladders and weighted the center with as much as i could gather

    a couple spare trailer wheels/tires, leadweights, a bag of shot, a short piece of rail road track & my smaller anvil.....

    not at all unlike the way folks weight the ends of the skids on the bottom of their boats only in reverse

    AND cutting the strips would give you something to do while you are watching paint dry ;-)

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Modesto, CA
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    752

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I have considered weighted persuasion. In this case, the strakes will need to be bent in all 3 axes. For this reason, I'm thinking steam.

    I promised some pics. Here is the after bay before being closed over by the aft deck.



    I still don't believe how well the whites match (the paint v. the plastic hatch covers).

    Finally, the after deck has been glued in place. (I just need to screw it down now.)



    Now for another visit to West Marine for more tape and fairing compound. Much closer to being ready for the gunwale structure. Work work work.
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:17 AM.

  31. #66
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
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    2,943

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Interesting boat. It looks like a rather large hull model of a Scamp.

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Modesto, CA
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    752

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Of course, like any artist, JW has his favorite themes. The dinghy also has some of the lines you'll see in his Sundowner. This dinghy has a very tightly turned up buttocks -- seen from a certain angle, it put me in mind of a small child taking evasive action in response to a pending paddling. Thus my remark in an earlier post regarding Welsford's sense of humor, this being his "Tender Behind" dinghy.

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Modesto, CA
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    752

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I'm in serious trouble now. The sales folk at West Marine greet me by name when I enter. ($$$) But I did get enough (I certainly hope) 410 fairing filler to finish the job. It rained yesterday, so I wasn't able to get any work done. I swear, the next boat I build will be in a proper shop. It was supposed to rain today, but this morning dawned clear, so I was able to get out to almost finish spreading a fairing layer over the taped seams. I have only about 14" yet to cover. So this evening I'm cruising the forum, and now, so late in the game, I run across the suggestion of using a cement trowel to spread the goo. Obviously, a cement trowel would be too large for my work, but I just happen to have a rather large pallet knife that is almost perfectly sized for this job. Too late we grow smart.

    Mentioned gluing up a steam box to my wife over dinner. I told her that what I'd been reading said the min temperature for curing Resorcinol glue was 70 degrees (F). These days we're lucky to see 59 degrees outside. I told her I'm going to have to cobble up a heat tent in the garage to do the gluing. She asked about volatility, mentioning the possibility of doing the work in the family room. So after dinner I'm reading the instructions, imagining my wife's reaction to seeing me wearing rubber gloves, aspirator and eye protection going to work in the family room. Perhaps I should do it in the back bedroom (and close the door).

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Modesto, CA
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    752

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    I am a bit tuckered this afternoon. Spent most of the morning sanding, then went to have lunch with a friend. Spent the afternoon sanding. (I'd like to think that) I've learned the trick to laying down a swath of fairing compound. Wednesday before the rains I laid down a second swath over the topmost longitudinal seam on the stbd side. Used my Liquitex #2 pallet knife. That puppy has almost 50 sq. cm of spreading area. I was able to spread the compound wide and thin, and smoothly. The last I've found saves the most work. I still have some sanding to do on the stbd bottom, and 3 micro-divots that need filling at the intersection of the frames.

    The weather guessers have promised me another 4 or 5 beautiful days (like today) for working, but unfortunately I'll lose the weekend to social obligations. I should be a grumpy old hermit. I guess two out of three isn't too bad. Should the weather hold, I might have the interior of the hull ready for its final coat of epoxy by Wednesday. But likely my luck won't hold out. Photos on Monday.

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Modesto, CA
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    752

    Default Re: Building a Welsford dinghy

    Monday -- back to work again.
    With photos as promised:

    I've covered the fillet at the rear deck with fairing compound, but before I learned the secret of using pallet knives. (I now have two for use here.)



    Even so, the build is looking more and more boatish.



    My wife is giving me grief for being so wasteful with the fairing compound. She says I'm leaving far too much in the mixing pot. Being self-taught in the ways of laying down the fairing compound, I'm posting a picture of one of my more wasteful pots. This is what I had left after I finished applying the overlay. Perhaps those on the forum with more experience than I can inform me, perhaps of ways to waste less.



    Today I was able to cover the forward half of the top longitudinal seam, Port Side. Once again I will have to expose myself to West Marine for more epoxy. I will confess to being extravagant in my use of epoxy. This is one area that I am aware of, and looking to ways of mending my ways. Back to the grindstone tomorrow.
    Last edited by webishop14; 08-16-2017 at 12:22 AM.

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