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Thread: Some real Aussie Politics

  1. #2766
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    I see you didn't open the link to see the graphic.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  2. #2767
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    In the six years of the Rudd / Gillard Labor government from 2007 to 2013, gross government debt increased by $225 billion, from just under $50 billion to just over $273 billion. These figures are from the government agency that borrows money on behalf of the government, the Australian Office of Financial Management.
    The escalation in government debt during the Labor years was due to the budget deficits which were driven by lower revenue as the global financial crisis hit tax payments to the government and were also the result of deliberate stimulus measures as the government implemented a range of one-off, big spending, policies to avoid a recession.
    It was a policy response that in 2011 meant Australia attained the coveted triple-A credit rating from all three major credit ratings for the first time in its history.
    In simple terms, government debt rose by an average of $38 billion a year under Labor and its policies.


    Under the current Coalition government, which has delivered three budgets and four Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook updates in almost three and a half years, gross government debt has increased by a further $203 billion to a record $476 billion. This has happened despite a strong world economy, interest rates locally being cut to record lows and the export sector being helped by a competitive level for the Australian dollar.
    The annual increase in government debt under the Liberal Government has been an average of $60 billion per year, some $22 billion a year more than under the previous Labor administration.
    But not only has the Coalition accrued debt at a vastly more rapid rate that the previous Labor government, there is no evidence of debt stabilising, let along being “paid off” as the Liberal Party pledged to prior to the 2013 election. Indeed, in Treasurer Scott Morrison’s budget update last month, the current policy framework has government debt reaching $600 billion by 2020.

    https://thekouk.com/item/450-labor-v...ment-debt.html


    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  3. #2768
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    I see you didn't open the link to see the graphic.
    Yes, I opened the link. What graphic?
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  4. #2769
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    In the six years of the Rudd / Gillard Labor government from 2007 to 2013, gross government debt increased by $225 billion, from just under $50 billion to just over $273 billion. These figures are from the government agency that borrows money on behalf of the government, the Australian Office of Financial Management.
    The escalation in government debt during the Labor years was due to the budget deficits which were driven by lower revenue as the global financial crisis hit tax payments to the government and were also the result of deliberate stimulus measures as the government implemented a range of one-off, big spending, policies to avoid a recession.
    It was a policy response that in 2011 meant Australia attained the coveted triple-A credit rating from all three major credit ratings for the first time in its history.
    In simple terms, government debt rose by an average of $38 billion a year under Labor and its policies.


    Under the current Coalition government, which has delivered three budgets and four Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook updates in almost three and a half years, gross government debt has increased by a further $203 billion to a record $476 billion. This has happened despite a strong world economy, interest rates locally being cut to record lows and the export sector being helped by a competitive level for the Australian dollar.
    The annual increase in government debt under the Liberal Government has been an average of $60 billion per year, some $22 billion a year more than under the previous Labor administration.
    But not only has the Coalition accrued debt at a vastly more rapid rate that the previous Labor government, there is no evidence of debt stabilising, let along being “paid off” as the Liberal Party pledged to prior to the 2013 election. Indeed, in Treasurer Scott Morrison’s budget update last month, the current policy framework has government debt reaching $600 billion by 2020.

    https://thekouk.com/item/450-labor-v...ment-debt.html


    You know, or you should... Labor dropped a whole bucketload of poison pills in before the 2013 election. NDIS, education funding etc. That last one, btw, typical Labor.... throw money at it... expenditure doubled whilst performance degraded.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  5. #2770
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Yet the Libs funded them, all good ideas but unfortunately the NDIS is being horribly mismanaged.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  6. #2771
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Albo is sticking it to wee Bill.....


    Anthony Albanese lays out his blueprint for government


    Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten and Shadow Minister for Transport and Infrastructure Anthony Albanese.




    Anthony Albanese has laid out his blueprint for government calling on Labor to follow the lead of Bob Hawke and Paul Keating and engage with big business, repudiating Bill Shorten’s anti-business crusade.

    Delivering the Whitlam oration tonight, Mr Albanese — a long-time leadership rival of Mr Shorten — said it was critical for a Labor government to engage with “unions, the business sector and civil society”.

    Ahead of a showdown in the Senate next week on the government’s proposal to cut the corporate tax rate for all businesses from 30 to 25 per cent, Mr Albanese said ugly public battles between unions and business “saps national energy” and “gets you nowhere”.


    In November last year, Mr Shorten was reported to have declared “war” on big businesses during an “unfriendly” lunch with the Business Council of Australia. Mr Shorten has led Labor’s campaign opposing company tax cuts for businesses with a turnover of more than $50 million.


    In contrast to his leader, Mr Albanese said “our job is not to sow discord, it is to bring people together in the service of the national interest”.


    “Labor doesn’t have to agree with business on issues such as company tax rates but we do have to engage constructively with business large and small,” Mr Albanese told supporters at the Shellharbour Club.


    “We respect and celebrate the importance of individual enterprise and the efforts and importance of the business community.”


    Ahead of the five Super Saturday by-elections on July 28, where Mr Shorten is fighting to retain four seats, Mr Albanese urged Labor to avoid being a wrecking opposition and embrace “optimism” and not “make the mistake of hoping to slide into government off the back of our opponents’ failures”.


    Mr Shorten has been privately attacked by colleagues over his negative campaigning on the citizenship crisis, which left him exposed after it was revealed Labor MPs were dual citizens ahead of the 2016 election.


    In a warning to the Labor parliamentary team, Mr Albanese said: “It’s not good enough to say: “Elect us because the other mob are useless”.


    In his speech, the former deputy prime minister said Labor must remember “this is not 1950, when most Australians were members of trade unions” and that party members must have a “more direct say in elections for public office and internal positions”.


    Following the 2013 federal election Mr Albanese won the popular vote of party members for leadership but could not secure enough votes from Labor caucus members under Kevin Rudd’s leadership formula.


    “Labor must recognise the importance of party branches to our understanding of what is happening in our country,” he said.


    “Indeed, many people from working class backgrounds are not members of unions because they were beneficiaries of Gough Whitlam’s education reforms.


    “They became the first people in their families to go to university, work in the professions and non-unionised industries, or start their own business.”


    Mr Albanese said Labor “cannot afford to ignore this demographic” and said “we need the energy and ideas of our membership”.


    “Their engagement enriches our platform and makes us a stronger, more broadly based political force.”


    “Labor must also maintain our internal processes that emphasis policy making from the bottom up.”


    Mr Albanese — a leading member of Labor’s left faction — also delivered a more succinct position on the party’s approach to the divisive asylum seeker issue, which has wedged Mr Shorten in recent months.


    The Labor frontbencher singled out Peter Dutton’s “indefinite detention of asylum seekers” and while supporting a strong border protection policy, said “a policy that uses its prolonged treatment of detained people as an ongoing deterrent to others has a deep flaw at its heart”.


    “Labor supports offshore detention and regional processing, in order to stop the people smuggling trade.”


    “But we call out the government’s failure to settle refugees in third countries, despite the clear offer of assistance from countries including New Zealand.


    “You can be tough on people smugglers without being weak on humanity. You can protect our borders without losing our national soul.”


    In the same week where the government attacked Mr Shorten over unfairly targeting ‘aspirational Australians’, Mr Albanese said Labor must be “a party of the people”.


    “The key to an effective plan for government is an understanding of the aspirations of our fellow Australians,” he said.


    “We in Labor must always ask ourselves: What do Australians want out of life and how can we help them achieve it.”


    “If you asked Malcolm Turnbull or Scott Morrison what Australians want out of life, they’d say more money. I’ve got a different view. Australians do care about quality of life. But they define quality of life as something more than the value of their share portfolio or how much money they have in the bank. Australians want happy and productive lives.”


    Mr Albanese — who also called for greater bipartisanship between the major parties — said it was crucial for Labor to promote jobs, education and access to top quality health care.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  7. #2772
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Read up on the NDIS mess and see if you can come up with suggestions ? It could be brilliant but maybe the Minister isn't interested, Dan Tehnan or Jane Prentice?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  8. #2773
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Bill Shorten. Ha Ha. Captain's call. Ha Ha
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  9. #2774
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    A great column by "one of their own", which will undoubtedly be ignored or dismissed by the looney left.

    The rot set in with current affairs, and ABC news has since lost its bearings



    ABC correspondent Geoffrey Luck in Belfast in 1970.




    GEOFFREY LUCK




    I began my working life as an ABC cadet journalist 15 years before Michelle Guthrie was born.

    As a regional journalist reading my own news bulletin in outback Queensland, as news editor responsible for training the first Papuans and New Guineans as journalists, as a foreign correspondent leading a talented team during the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and finally as the ABC’s (only) economics and finance correspondent, I was proud to work for the Majestic Fanfare. Today, I would be ashamed to be associated with ABC news and current affairs.

    My view is the result of observing, listening and watching the decline of news coverage and output across 70 years. By contrast, Guthrie’s real knowledge of the ABC dates only from her appointment as its managing director two years ago.

    Our perspectives, understandably, are poles apart. She knows only the organisation she was bequeathed; I measure the decline in news values, accuracy, balance, impartiality, leadership and self-control across two generations.

    The community’s simmering disquiet with the public broadcaster’s decline in credibility has been trying for years to find its expression in policy terms. The recent populist clamour to “sell off the ABC” can be seen as a final incoherent shout from the frustrated and disappointed.

    Much nonsense has been talked in arguing that proposition. It misses the point, just as Guthrie’s recent speech to the Melbourne Press Club did.

    The speech demonstrated how little she understood of journalism. Not only did she confine her admiration of “hallowed names” of ABC journalists to those who were retired or dead, she also went on to define the role of her journalists as “their relentless drive to ensure that the institutions and processes which are the foundations of our democratic system work to the benefit of that community; their determination to provide a voice for the powerless, the weak and the intimidated; their ability to shine the light on malfeasance and corruption”.

    Wrong! That’s exactly the problem with ABC news and current affairs. One might think a managing director who had assumed the unearned title of editor-in-chief would at least make seeking facts and objective truth the hallmark of a news service. It used not to be difficult to define news in those terms.

    Instead, with the ABC there is too much excitement about “investigative journalism”, exposing malfeasance and corruption, co-operating with newspapers it was formed to distance itself from, and celebrating loudly its petty exposures. If Guthrie’s virtues are the consequence of good news gathering, well and good, but they are not the principal purpose.

    ABC news is now trivialised. Every night the flagship 7pm television bulletin runs petty local stories ahead of news of consequence to the nation and the world. The audience decline reflects its loss of credibility.

    Sixty years ago I always had to have a coin in my pocket to phone in a story. Today’s technology allows pictures and sound to be transmitted wirelessly from an event and put to air live. But the ABC is so seduced by this ability, its policy is to have journalists report live every possible story.

    That completely distorts news values. Trivial crimes, road accidents and court reports occupy minutes of airtime, a reporter ad-libbing tedious detail against a backdrop that adds nothing.

    That supposedly is the new virtue of “immediacy”, but what the viewer notices is the reduction in the number of stories in a bulletin and the foreshortening of major reports. The latest overuse of the technology is the live cross to a press conference. Politicians twigged to the advantage of cutting out the reporter and speaking direct to voters. I have timed them as lasting seven to nine minutes, because they’re hard to interrupt.

    When I remonstrated with the ABC that the live-streaming technique put editorial control in the hands of the politicians, editorial policy chief Alan Sunderland replied that immediacy was fundamentally important in a news environment. In other words, technology is not merely a tool; demonstrating technical prowess is more important than content.

    How the wheel has turned. Forty-five years ago general manager Talbot Duckmanton chided me as London editor for sending voice reports for the morning national news: “There’s too much talking in the bulletins,” he said.

    The multiplicity of news programs across many radio and TV channels has put supervision of news content in the hands of the producer of each. Gone are the knowledge, wisdom and authority of the chief sub-editor, who caught mistakes before they went to air and put a stop to any juvenile attempts to introduce comment or opinion.

    ABC news once had a style guide. If it still exists, it’s been watered down, or allowed to be flouted. For example, adjectives were banned, except in quotation. Today reporters use them to subtly colour their stories. Preambles and summary conclusions were prohibited because they were comment, potentially indicating how a listener should interpret the item. Opinion, unless as a direct quote, would see the reporter sent back to rewrite. Yet the other day a Washington correspondent took it upon himself to characterise Donald Trump as “a President under siege”, then interpreted his comments about past policies as “insulting the other side”.

    Such lazy, undisciplined writing goes unremarked, but is understandably seen as evidence of bias. Too often, interviewers don’t just ask questions, they argue.

    What explains the ABC’s departure from its charter and its own code of practice and editorial guidelines? How does the public get the impression of “groupthink” on issues from Palestine to same-sex marriage to climate change?

    The news staff has always been “bolshie” in the sense of rooting for the underdog, critical of authority and politically left in inclination. At the Labor split in the 1950s, half the Brisbane newsroom went down the road and joined the ALP in protest at Vince Gair and the Democratic Labour Party. When BHP announced its first $1 million profit, sub-editors on the national newsdesk were outraged — until I pointed out it represented only 2 per cent return on its steel assets.

    In the past, there was discipline. Personal views were never allowed to intrude. Management control and sub-editorial oversight ensured that, and reporters understood instinctively that impartiality was fundamentally the basis for public trust. It was our role to provide the facts, not to change the world.

    Management lost control with the arrival of current affairs. While news was strictly held to editorial standards — and its journalists were actively deterred from broadcasting — ambitious executives recruited young university graduates to launch current affairs programs — AM and PM on radio, and This Day Tonight on TV.

    Fact, analysis, opinion and political barrow-pushing — together at times with undergraduate clowning — became inseparably confused.

    tbc.....
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  10. #2775
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    concluding paras:

    What’s forgotten is that in 1976 news journalists were on the verge of striking over current affairs trying to take over the right to break news. On the day of the Whitlam dismissal, AM/PM staff seized control of the phone circuits to Canberra with the concurrence of senior management, preventing Canberra news staff from filing their stories. Four years later, the growing conflict escalated when current affairs tried to cover the national wage case decision in a live broadcast. A strike by journalists was averted only when management brokered a peace deal that involved the two departments sharing the broadcast.

    Now, a story that’s never been published. In an attempt to persuade management to impose the same editorial standards on current affairs staff and programs, a nationwide journalists’ conference in 1976 voted unanimously to merge news and current affairs. I was studying for my MBA degree part-time, and persuaded John Hunt, a leading behavioural scientist, to conduct the all-day seminar for us for free. Duckmanton ignored the findings. It was years before the merger took place, but left current affairs, with its loose editorial principles, ascendant.

    At the heart of the community’s frustration with the ABC is its refusal to enforce its charter. For more than 30 years it has been fighting to escape accountability for its news and current affairs broadcasts. It first resisted government attempts to impose an external complaints review body, then watered down its internal self-regulatory system so that only the most egregious breaches can be upheld. It amended its editorial policies five times in 10 years. It even introduced a new category of “resolved” to avoid classing a complaint as “rejected” or “upheld”.

    It could well be argued that the ABC board is not fulfilling its duty under section 8 (1) (c) of the ABC Act, which requires it: “to ensure that the gathering and presentation by the Corporation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism”.

    The ABC board has consistently shown its inability or unwillingness to investigate, let alone enforce, the key attributes, impartiality and objectivity. If it cannot carry out its obligations under the law, it’s time for the government to impose a remedy.

    A simple amendment to the act would establish an independent external body — call it an ombudsman — to handle all complaints about breaches of the ABC charter, its code of practice and editorial guidelines. It would bring all programming under the same rules. The internal audience and consumer affairs section only masquerades as independent, a case of the policeman investigating the police.

    Nine years ago the ABC proudly published a paper, Change with Continuity, in which it said: “Media professionals need to grow thicker skins. They need to accept more and harsher criticism, disseminate it more readily, correct errors swiftly, be willing to clarify, explain their decisions, acknowledging their misjudgments, and where appropriate, apologise.”

    Bringing the broadcasters to heel by making them answer to an external umpire would sidestep the powerful staff interests, neutralise Guthrie’s nonsense, and enable the board to restore discipline. With a stroke of the pen, the government could stop the rot.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  11. #2776
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  12. #2777
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    ^
    "People should be able to access these benefits [Social Welfare] as a matter of right, with no more loss of their own standards of self-respect than would be involved in collecting from an insurance company the proceeds of an endowment policy on which they have been paying premiums for years."
    Robert Menzies - Liberal Party (Conservative) Prime Minister of Australia.

  13. #2778
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Good one !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  14. #2779
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    When will the ABC learn the concept of responsibility?

    ABC panned over Paul Bongiorno Uncle Tom slur


    Warren Mundine, left, has slammed the ABC’s response to a reference by Paul Bongiorno, right, to the indigenous leader as “Uncle Tom”.




    Warren Mundine has slammed a “hypocritical and disgraceful” response from the ABC after it distanced itself from commentator Paul Bongiorno and his reference to the indigenous businessman with the racial slur “Uncle Tom”.

    In a statement provided to The Australian yesterday, the public broadcaster said: “Mr Bongiorno is not an ABC employee; his Twitter account is not an ABC account; any tweets are Mr Bongiorno’s own.”

    It came a week after Bongiorno tweeted on July 8: “As many ‘righties’ on Dky (sic) after dark panels … and that includes ‘Uncle Tom’ lefties craving relevance.”
    Mr Mundine told The Australian last night the tweet was written in clear reference to him, and described the ABC’s reaction as unacceptable.

    “Any organisation that reacted in this way would deserve to be pilloried for their pathetic, weak response,” he said.



    Paul Bongiorno.

    The former ALP president said he was attacked on social media daily for his indigenous heritage but never expected such comments from a journalist linked to the public broadcaster.

    “I just find the whole thing bloody bizarre,” Mr Mundine said. “If anybody would stand up against racist rhetoric, you would think it’s the ABC.

    “Racial slurs are unacceptable and if you look at my Twitter feed and Facebook, I’m just pilloried every day with racial comments … and now this coming from a person who is supposed to be a reputable, senior, respected journalist makes it even worse.

    “He should know better; it’s a disgrace he’s able to get away with one of these comments — he is now a troll.”

    Mr Mundine said the ABC had lost all credibility for not speaking out against its contractor, who regularly appears on programs.

    “I want to have a meeting with Michelle Guthrie and also their senior media people,” Mr Mundine said. “The idea you can say something racial, one of the most dreadful things you can to a person of colour, and get away with it is a total disgrace.”

    Bongiorno apologised last night for causing offence and said he never intended to use a racist slur but he objected to Mr Mundine calling for the ABC to sack him.

    “I am an independent commentator and journalist, currently on holidays; it is passing strange that the only reaction to some who take offence is to demand one of my employers sack me,” he tweeted.

    “My tweet was in response to an attack on the ABC for only having ‘lefty’ panels. I made the point that there is plenty of evidence to show Sky has ‘rightie’ panels or acceptable ‘lefties’, which was my intention using the term ‘Uncle Tom.’ ”
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Contrary to purri's position I reckon Bongiorno is one of the best we've got but I can't excuse the use of such a term. There are better terms to indicate that some members of the RW press are paid shills. The ABC is under enough pressure as it is, but he is not an employee. They can decide to use him, or not as a contractor/commentator. I for one would miss his concise and informative commentary.

    Re Guthrie. Murdoch clone and not too flash. Put there to oversee the diminishing of the ABC.

    And this:"Bringing the broadcasters to heel by making them answer to an external umpire would sidestep the powerful staff interests, neutralise Guthrie’s nonsense, and enable the board to restore discipline. With a stroke of the pen, the government could stop the rot."
    Agreed but that's not what the agenda is.

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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by purri View Post
    "Bongiorno" has run the usual Right and Left wing colonial mission management issues to promote their collective agendae. FFS! They are all shills!

    GFR! Padraic McGuiness was of the same; consider that I knew the poisonous PoS since 1969, a denizen of the Forth and Clyde hotel at inner Sydney's dockside suburb of Balmain, holding forth to a captive audience of undergraduate acolytes.

    His neo-liberal agenda since and thereafter the USYD days under the Challis As/pro John Anderson was grossly evident and was namesods the "New?/Sydney Push with their HQ at the Royal George hotel! Thereas under the guise of intellectual and professed equality (one sided sexual equality?/oppression, co-opting the so named flower power troops) males continued to treat women and blaks as grist to their "innerlectual" carp. Just 2 bob barflies on the workers that appropriate their "oppressed associations" to their profit.

    Germaine Greer and others have some words to say on the matter.

    Arrrglufhghfd birnnnnnbib glug..........

    Oh yeah, and Germaine Greer, blakfella as she is, reckons rape should have a 200 hours community service penalty
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    Arrrglufhghfd birnnnnnbib glug..........

    Oh yeah, and Germaine Greer, blakfella as she is, reckons rape should have a 200 hours community service penalty
    6 feet of chain and 3 feet of 90lb rail, pick and shovel, somewhere very remote. 200 hours is a bit short though…………..

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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    6 feet of chain and 3 feet of 90lb rail, pick and shovel, somewhere very remote. 200 hours is a bit short though…………..
    It's an interesting approach, from someone who was raped
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Eh? Not me…….. To get a conviction the penalty has to be something a jury will be comfortable about, but it should have consequences the offender will remember.

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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Eh? Not me…….. To get a conviction the penalty has to be something a jury will be comfortable about, but it should have consequences the offender will remember.
    I agree... and you may recall that I was the foreman of the jury on what was a relatively innocuous rape case. The guy was sentenced to 32 months in gaol. Not sure what the non parole period was... but he probably was out in about a year or a year and a little bit. Yeah, in that case, no-one would have been upset at 200 hours community service, but it was as innocuous as you'd ever get. The couple involved had been caught shagging on a median strip three months earlier. The night of the rape, he'd had 14 schooners, she'd had at least a dozen. It was a loaf that was well cut. She couldn't remember much at all. However.... she did say "no".

    I do remember well that one of the women on the jury said "I'm not sending any man to gaol". She wasn't comfortable with any custodial sentence. However, I managed to get her to vote on the main issue, rather than her side issue.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  21. #2786
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    After that amount of booze how was anyone a reliable witness?
    I was foreman on one where the allegation was made out of embarrassment after he said no, but she told her friends he'd done it. They told someones mum and that was it.
    Half way through the trial she realised what was happening and told the truth. I reckon the prosecutor's rantings gave her quite a shock.

  22. #2787
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    After that amount of booze how was anyone a reliable witness?
    I was foreman on one where the allegation was made out of embarrassment after he said no, but she told her friends he'd done it. They told someones mum and that was it.
    Half way through the trial she realised what was happening and told the truth. I reckon the prosecutor's rantings gave her quite a shock.
    The look on the prosecutors face when the woman turned up to give evidence, wearing a pink terrytowelling jumpsuit was priceless. The main witness was a minister of religion, whose wife had heard the woman repeatedly saying "no"... and sent him out to investigate.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  23. #2788
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    Default Re: Some real Aussie Politics

    Possibly a dangerous thing for the minister to do. He could have had both of them turn on him…………….. Happened before…..

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