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Thread: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

  1. #246
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Wow, 18mm diameter - 26 tonnes !

    Nae bad.

    Great progress, thanks for posting. Is the whole of the interior needing a refurb?

  2. #247
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    The interior needs quite a bit of cosmetic work, but some structural too. I'm going to keep the layout as it was built and use what's still good. Most of the mahogany just needs a sanding and new varnish, but the bulkheads are formica, which I want to cover or replace with painted v-groove. I need to run new electrical, install a new sole, and completely gut and rebuild the head. It's going to be fun!

  3. #248
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Just binged on your restoration. Looks awesome, spectacular work you are doing. Thank you for sharing it all.

  4. #249
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration



    Thanks, Hreoaj!

    Doing a lot of maintenance lately from sailing: varnish this scratch, touch-up paint that gouge, re-rig the outhaul, some wiring improvements, re-bed a stanchion, re-rig the running backs, caulk a few more spots on the deck, clean, etc.
    Basically, as soon as she went back in the water, it's been a bit of "Ready! Set! Redo a bunch of stuff you just did! Go!!" Ah, wooden boats.

    Participated in the Jessica Cup last weekend. Got the spinnaker up for the fist time and had a blast. And then spent way too much time trying to untangle the wrap of the halyard up at the block to get it down....oh well.
    Now that the weather is changing to more rain on the horizon, the interior projects can begin in earnest.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:12 PM.

  5. #250
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    It's been a busy couple of months! Unfortunately, most of the flurry was not boat-related. But I have made some progress. Decided to start the interior work by reconstructing the head. In all, I will ultimately replace the main cabinetry, counter, sole, toilet, and install v-groove planks for the walls. Started by finishing and painting the beadboard ceiling. I'll post pictures later.

    December though, ended up being consumed by making a full boat cover. I didn't know how to sew, but after pricing bids for covers, I decided it would be well worth the effort to learn how. I'd been using a blue plastic tarp/ painter's drop cloth combo for protection up until this point, and I think everyone on the dock was happy to see it finally go. My friend Chris lent me his sailrite machine, and my Mom came in town to help. She is an excellent teacher! We crammed through as much fabric as we could in the few days she was here, and then it took another two weeks for me to finish it up. I saved a ton doing it myself and learned a lot- including how to make it a bit easier if I'm ever unfortunate enough to have to make another one.



    Because I want a year-round cover that is quick to take on and off, I designed it so it would also double as the mainsail cover. This area was the trickiest part to pattern since the seams all meet in mid-air. After going this route, we learned a better way to do it. But this worked in the end.



    Mom in the heat of battle. Dealing with the endless acres of fabric in a small space was the hardest part of the construction.





    I'm using the spinnaker pole for support in front. The edge is folded back under and pockets are sewn in for sandbags, which I'll place this weekend. She's ready for the winter rain.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:13 PM.

  6. #251
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    That looks excellent; nothing like the feeling a new snug cover gives you!

    What material did you use? Breathable or 100% waterproof?

  7. #252
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thanks, lupussonic! It's breathable. I used Top Notch 9, which is similar to Sunbrella.

  8. #253
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Renting a school gym or a hallway while school is out for a long weekend or vacation would be useful for the acres of cloth. Sitting cross legged on the floor for hours would be dreadful.
    Nice work , BTW.

  9. #254
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thank you. Yeah, I should have thought of that weeks ago. If I ever tackle something this big again, I'll certainly try to arrange better accommodations first.

  10. #255
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Good holiday story, great looking cover, help from friends, and time with mom.

  11. #256
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I like your cover, great job!

  12. #257
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Beautiful job well done! Thank you for sharing all the details, binging on it made today's day in the office pass much more quickly! (It also makes the bit of tidying needed on my Blue Jay look a doddle!)

  13. #258
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Robb View Post
    Renting a school gym or a hallway while school is out for a long weekend or vacation would be useful for the acres of cloth.
    Good thinking. I'm going to have to make a new cover for my boat this summer, and was wondering about how to go about it.

    BdbFC, please feel free to share your thought process and tips on how you did it, and why.

    You said your cover acts as a mainsail cover as well?

    What is the edging material? same stuff different colour?

    Any Sailrite machine tips? What thread did you use?


    PS I once made a dinghy cover from hemp cloth, lovely heavy canvas that was breathable. Sewed it together with nylon thread used to bind rings onto fishing rods. After a week of pushing the needle a million miles it was lovely and clearly superior to all the pvc covers everyone else had. After one summer the hemp was fine, but the thread had desintegrated from UV, and after the first storm it was in shreds. My superiority shrivelled up like a wrinkled balloon.

    The harder they come....

  14. #259
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Two main reasons for the cover, plus secondary ones. I want to keep as much rainwater off of (read: out of) the deck since the underlaying plywood is already in not-so-great shape. And I want UV protection for the varnish. Secondarily, to keep the boat cleaner and keep potential drips from getting down to the engine compartment under the cockpit. (not that that's a huge worry, but the dryer I can keep the wiring and the batteries, the better.)

    In a way, fighting the blue tarps during hull construction and at the dock gave me a pretty good idea of what worked and what didn't. I think I've tied and untied that thing a hundred times, so I sort of knew what I wanted design-wise.

    I can't speak highly enough for sailrite and their video tutorials. So detailed and well laid out. They are very easy to follow. So based on their winter cover dvd, I modified the design a bit for my own needs. They show a set-up where the mainsail has been taken off, and the foredeck support for the cover meets at the same height as the boom. (Meaning for their cover, the mast acts like a large stanchion to just go around. Pretty simple) Mine has the sail still attached and my foredeck support (the spinnaker pole) meets at a higher spot than the boom. So getting the panels to meet up neatly in that area was a little tricky. The other major design difference was how I made the internal pockets for the sandbags by folding the skirt portion under and sewing vertical stiching every foot and a half or so. That way I can place sandbags wherever the cover sags without any fuss, and I have access all around the boat from underneath the cover. I didn't want to mess with hanging external bags. Plus, I wanted to go over the lifelines instead of straight to the toerail, so I sewed a lot of internal anchor points for the tiedowns.

    That said, if I were to do it again, here are some of the things I would do differently:

    The cover was made of 9 panels, 60" wide. The panel that incorporates the mast and shrouds, I would focus on first and make sure I'm happy with the mast fit before making any of the other panels. That way I'd have a fixed reference for every subsequent measurement, and the trickiest pattern would be done. I did the opposite, where I made the entire front and rear sections, and then tried to fit the mast panel to those two. It just made it a two-front war.

    Next, I would find a better way to lock the boom in place - again for fixed reference points for measuring. I have a crutch, but it is off-center from the boat, and I wanted the boom centered. I tied the boom to the backstay, but if I pulled a panel too hard, it could move an inch or two, and that made it difficult to trust my marks.

    I would have the entire cover fitted and done, front to back, before i measured and cut the skirts. It's math and it should work out from the initial measurements, but once you start pushing and pulling the fabric around and sewing irregular things together, it can change on you. I was guessing a bit on the measurements for length of the mast panel section, but guessed wrong, so now the skirt rides up just enough to expose some of the toerail varnish by the shroud zippers. I might add a miniskirt if it bugs me enough.

    And as mentioned before, being able to lay the fabric out flat on a wood floor so you can slide things around and easily move them is key. You have to roll and unroll and fold and flip the mass a lot!

    For the sailrite stuff, I used their V92 polyester thread. Hopefully, it will hold up to the UV okay. I used their shelter-rite (like vinyl) material for chafe protection and edges. That's what the black material is on my cover. And the only machine tips I can give is have lots of bobbins on hand (I had only one that I was constantly refilling), and experiment to get the thread tension as perfect as you can. I had a lot of random issues with my backstiching, and I'm sure it's because my tension wasn't fully dialed in. But the machine is pretty bullet proof, and it worked great.

  15. #260
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thanks for that, useful info. It looks very good!

  16. #261
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Happy new year, everyone! I spent the rainy days of last week milling some sapele boards to use for the main cabin sole, and prepped the cleats for the head sole. The current sole is made from plywood, and painted with grey paint. The cabin floor is a little less than four feet wide, so I can replace that with four new planks - two screwed down on the outer edges, and two in the center that can be lifted for bilge access. The center planks will be cut into shorter pieces, butted together to make lifting the sections manageable.

    After making a cardboard template of the port piece, I transferred the outline to a sapele plank and cut it to fit.





    Afterwards, I measured and cut the center pieces and will dry fit all of those before making the template of the starboard side. I want to make sure they all fit together tightly. Then demo of the current sole...

    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:14 PM.

  17. #262
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    There's thorough. There's overkill. And then there's Hana...

    Like a Where's Waldo puzzle. How many screws can you find in this 4" square bit of plywood sole? I'll give you a hint. Many more than you can see.

    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:11 PM.

  18. #263
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Finally found enough time to complete the cabin sole. I still need to refinish the settees before I reinstall them, but now they'll have something to sit on so I can sit on too.




    It ended up being a bit more involved than I was hoping (as is always the case). The starboard sole support was not quite square to midline, but I didn't catch that until I'd already made the most starboard piece. So the next plank in needed to taper a small amount for it's whole length.
    I made the cross cuts first, and then used a hand plane to shave down the right sides of the five pieces butted together. Took a bit of back and forth to get it all to fit. The old "measure twice, cut once" got me again. In my case, it's always "I could have sworn I measured that correctly...."
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:10 PM.

  19. #264
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Been a while since posting here. Bummed about photobucket! Geez, what a pain to go through those again. I did a test with the above image after switching to imgur. Might slowly re-add the images just so I have a record of what was done. I'll post more current updates in the near future.

  20. #265
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I've reconstructed the photo thread after battling with POS photobucket for a few days (and even added a couple of extra photos). Safari, Chrome and Mozilla were rendered unusable by the thousands of pop up ads on the site as I tried to download the photos. Found a browser called Opera that does ad blocking. I was able to download most, before photobucket started spamming me that I was using an ad blocker! Man, they suck. But I was able to screen capture the rest.

    I've got a ways to go to catch up the pictures to present day, but I want to keep a record of everything. Without the pressure of trying to get the boat out of the yard, in addition to other life events, the pace has slowed. I've learned over the past year that this restoration is actually a continuous journey and there will never really be a final end goal. You just kind of start over again. But I think that's better in the long run. Some of the things I've done to this point may need to be redone (and some already have). Many things will need to be done and get pushed to lower priority, so it feels like forever before I can get to them. And some will probably never get attended to. But my hope is that Hana improves, little by little, with each step. It's still fun.


    SO, to continue the thread... and speaking of steps.



    After installing the sole almost exactly a year ago, my next task was to use the left over sapele and make cabin steps for the entrance. The original plywood ones were delaminated and rotten. I saved the slip guards for reuse though.

  21. #266
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I set up shop in the cockpit under the cover with my mitersaw and jig saw, after milling some v-groove 3/8" planks at home. The lightweight wood was epoxied on the back and sides, and then primed and painted on the fronts. This will ultimately be installed on the aft cabin walls and head walls as well. Possibly up in the v-berth too, but I haven't decided yet.








  22. #267
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Well, I followed this restoration closely while you were going hard at it. I recently took my Father in Law out to Spaulding Marine Center while I was visiting at Christmas. He owned and restored a 42' Mathews cruiser years ago. The people at Spaulding are amazing. You picked a great place to do that boat. They let us muse and peruse for an hour and a half. The old man was really happy.

    I took several great pictures of Freda at the dock and am only slightly disappointed I didn't realize what was under the cover next to her. Maybe next time!


    Great work. Thanks,
    Curtis

  23. #268
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thanks, Curtis! I enjoyed the history of the place and learned a lot there. It's nice to hear that you and your father-in-law had a good visit.

  24. #269
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    After finishing the bulkhead, we went for a sail one weekend and learned what can happen when a winch isn't serviced. It stops working. The starboard main winch froze suddenly and completely. I hadn't disassembled them yet (it was on the list) and since they worked, I honestly didn't really even think about them much. But now it became imperative. Back at the dock, I couldn't get the housing off, which should have slid off by hand -even tied a block around the boom to try winch it off. It was stuck solid. Ended up renting a 2 ton puller from an auto supply place which did the trick. The friction of all the caked on dirt was enough to seize it.



    I soaked it for a couple of days in a bucket of mineral spirits. After a bit of scrubbing, it cleaned up well.





    I greased and reassembled the winch, and then set off to tear down and service the other 7.

  25. #270
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Good to get on the front foot with such items. I bet they're whirring and clicking a good'n now.

  26. #271
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    just finished reading your saga with hana. amazing work and follow through. i think someone should institute a class action lawsuit against pb, although it seems most of your pics are back. also, i am also in awe that all was done with a daily commute to the yard!

    jim

  27. #272
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Jim, it's true - the commute was a buzzkill and drew the project out longer than it would have otherwise. But that said, while it's really great that Hana is berthed only a couple of minutes away from my office now so I can do a quick bit of work during my lunch break or afterwards, I do sometimes miss having all the shop tools right by the boat. I do the bigger projects in my garage at home, about 20 min away from the marina. There have been many occasions where I'm at the boat or in the garage and need that one tool or last measurement that's at the other location. Such is life.

    The next project I tackled after the bulkhead v-groove was finished was to remake the settee fronts. I initially planned on keeping the original fronts, even though they had holes and cutouts in them, but after starting to strip and revarnish them, there was a lot of waterstaining and other wear that didn't look too good. The new varnish almost accentuated how beat up they were. So I chose to make new ones. The originals were made out of mahogany plywood with a solid mahogany cap.



    I used the old fronts as templates for the plywood. Later I removed and reused the cleats on the new pieces.



    I cut a tongue for the plywood with a router, and the corresponding groove for the cap on the tablesaw.



    For the cap glue-up, I was short a couple of clamps, so I improvised with a tourniquet(tm) clamp of rope.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:08 PM.

  28. #273
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration



    I made the caps slightly wider than the plywood and then sanded it flush. I was a little worried the sander might burn through the veneer before I could get it completely flush, but it wasn't a problem. I then rounded over the caps.



    New and old. The index cards were used as a template to mark the new location of the sole.





    I used the original airflow grates.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-12-2018 at 12:05 PM.

  29. #274
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration



    I next began to work on restoring the head. After removing the sink cabinetry, I needed to replace the sole first. Again with using leftover planking sapele, I found enough narrow strips to cover a base of 3/8" marine ply. I didn't want to cut into any substantial pieces if I didn't have to. The alternating color wasn't ideal, but I thought I could live with it once I applied the finish.









    I couldn't say I loved it even though it fit pretty well. But I totally botched cutting out the trap door with a oscillating saw so I decided to make another sole with more uniform lumber. (I may have even done it subconsciously)

    That said, my intent was to cut as flush a kerf as possible so the trapdoor would sit snuggly. Even after scoring the panel, I still couldn't cut a perfectly straight line for the four sides with the dremel blade. It wandered just enough to make crooked lines, even using a metal straight edge as a guide. I'd be curious how you would approach cutting a door into a solid panel. Maybe I'd just have to accept that it would not sit that flush and use a jigsaw or circular saw?
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-20-2018 at 02:08 AM.

  30. #275
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    So, I used some of the wider leftovers I had, and built the sole out of five pieces - two edges, and three down the middle. The trap door and the longer piece that will sit under the head can both be pulled up for access. And by building it like this, the seams are almost invisible.





    before/after
    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-20-2018 at 02:15 AM.

  31. #276
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Wow, you've been busy! Looking good mate.

  32. #277
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    You are reminding me that I need to finish all of the fun stuff I started on last Fall!
    Jay

  33. #278
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    nice work. i probably would have stuck with the first piece. lol.

    jim

  34. #279
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I've caught up today on this whole thread - very entertaining, educational, and a little frightening as I just acquired a similar vintage and size sailboat. Fortunately, she's starting out in better shape (at least the basic hull/frame/powerplant.

    I'm especially interested in these last interior finish-out projects since that's where I'll be starting. Most of Nixie's interior is unremarkable painted marine plywood with a mish-mash of trim from different owners/projects - some original mahogany, some recent teak, and a bunch of just plain old pine/fir. I have the same idea of using vertical v-groove on the bulkhead over the painted plywood - now I don't have to imagine it - looks great!

    Why did you decide to go with plywood/veneer for the sole? Like yours was, mine is currently just gray painted marine ply cut into a variety of strips and panels with no rhyme or reason to it, each screwed down to the floor timbers. I was thinking of replacing with strips of solid hardwood (teak?) maybe 2" wide. I'd have to make a hatch by tying together a 4 or 5 wide with cleats on the back but that seems simple enough. In my mind, it would just be a very small version of strip hardwood flooring in a house. Now that I'm typing it, I wonder if the engineered strip flooring that is sold for houses in "damp" locations (basements, etc.) would work and be another option?

  35. #280
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thanks for the encouragement, everyone!

    sejman, I went with 3/8" strips over 3/8" plywood because I had a lot of thin boards leftover from the hull planks and I wanted to use them up. But I only did that in the v-berth and the first sole I made for the head. The cabin sole and the current head sole are solid 3/4" sapele. For long lengths though, the strips glued over plywood is more stable and less prone to bending under foot. I actually need to add a few extra supports under the cabin sole, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.

    My guess is you could use the engineered flooring if you wanted to, but they don't usually come in long lengths, so it might look a little odd. I have no idea how they'd hold up in a sometimes very wet environment, so you'd have to choose the material carefully.

    Good luck with your project. Post some pics when you get into it!

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