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Thread: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

  1. #281
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    The beadboard ceiling in the head had never been completed or painted by whoever had installed it.



    One board was short. Since I didn't have the stock to replace it, I found a dowel in my garage that was almost exactly the diameter of the bead and fit a triangle wedge piece to fill up the space.





    After sanding, priming, and topcoats. New varnish on the mahogany is still on the to-do list. I've also got to make some covers for the vent and undermounted bolts.

    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-26-2018 at 03:18 PM.

  2. #282
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    The walls in the head received the same v-groove treatment as the bulkhead. The cabinet needed to be stripped and sanded before repainting. Left to do in there is replace the felt dividers under the glass doors. Anyone have a source for such a thing? I figure I'll probably just have to improvise. And sorry for the closeup photos, the room is too small for the iphone.





    Last edited by bdbFC; 02-26-2018 at 03:21 PM.

  3. #283
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by bdbFC View Post
    The walls in the head received the same v-groove treatment as the bulkhead. The cabinet needed to be stripped and sanded before repainting. Left to do in there is replace the felt dividers under the glass doors. Anyone have a source for such a thing? I figure I'll probably just have to improvise. And sorry for the closeup photos, the room is too small for the iphone.






    The images are not coming up....

  4. #284
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    For me neither..

  5. #285
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Are you using Chrome for a browser? I can see them on Firefox and Safari, but not Chrome. I'll see if I can figure out what's going on

  6. #286
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I think it's fixed now.

  7. #287
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Looks great - exactly what I have in mind for my bulkhead and head enclosure. What the heck is that weird pink'ish marbley stuff that was originally there? Is it wallpaper? My mahogany (or teak?) trim is flush to the plywood on the "door" side of the bulkhead so I'm going to have to build it up where the V-groove (or maybe I'll use beadboard) ends to trim it properly. It looks like your V-grove was thin enough were able to set yours right inside the existing trim, even in the head, without having to remove and reset all that trim, right?

  8. #288
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    It was formica. I assume it was supposed to look fancy. To whom, I have no idea.

    Since common v-groove planks are at least 3/4" with a tongue and groove, the only part you see is the 1/4" or so v-groove. So I milled the boards to a touch more than 5/16" and ripped the v bevel on the table saw on both sides. And yes, in the head, the trim stood proud so I could just butt the edges into the corners. In the main cabin, the mahogany trim was flush with the formica but rounded corners, so it wouldn't have been easy to build it up. So I just let the bevel side be adjacent to the trim edge. Not ideal, but It looks ok.

  9. #289
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I'm using Chrome... but fixed now.

    This is so cool, and must feel so good for you. I'm not familiar with Farallone boats at all, never sailed on one, and frankly they're not my boat type of choice, although I could see how one can fall in love. But I can certainly see the joy and feel the excitement and passion you must feel when getting on with these projects, from the initial major rebuild, to the fittings and fixtures, the painting, and of course the sailing, which must feel like bonding with her. It's always so satisfying to make, restore and rebuild, and then to live with your work. This is a great thread showing much skill, love and attention to detail, and in the end, it's the details we remember. Awesome, keep at it. I'll keep reading.

  10. #290
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Any advice about what type of wood to use for that kind of interior wainscoting or finish work? My main concern is stability with long periods of high humidity (winter) and warmer dry times (summer) here in Seattle. I'd hate to do all that nice trim work and have it buckling or shrinking over time. Does priming/sealing on all sides before installation solve the problem? MDF (as commonly used in cabinet construction for the panels due to its stability) seems like an option except it's terrible when it actually gets wet.

  11. #291
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Thanks for the kind words, lupussonic! I get a lot of satisfaction out of the project, and am really glad I was able to keep her from languishing. I think she wasn't too far from being too far gone. I wish I had more time and resources to put to her though. She's really fun to sail.

    sejman, yes, sealing all the sides will help keep the wood stable and prevent moiture intrusion. I would absolutely recommend doing that. The wood will still move some with changes in humidity, but not as much as if it's left untreated. Any rot-resistant wood like cedar would be a good choice, or even pine or spruce since it's not structural. Lighter is better. Don't use mdf. The moisture would wreck it

  12. #292
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    After finishing the vgroove install, I switched gears to do a bunch of miscellaneous projects.





    I hauled out at Berkeley to do bottom paint and check her over after the first year. Everything looked good except the coal tar epoxy on the keel was blistered all over and flaking off in patches. So I ended up spending two days grinding it all off and refairing with west epoxy. (no pics unfortunately)





    Hana came with a short bronze track where the main sheet was attached to padeye. It could be lowered to leeward but there was no way to pull it up under load, so I decided to install a traveler. Had to hacksaw off most of the nuts from the bolts holding the track down, drill and plug the existing holes with dowels, and then bed and set the new track. I took the oppurtunity to strip and revarnish the mainsheet blocks too.



    And among some other small jobs, I added thin plywood ceiling to make the base of the settee storage, and repainted and reinstalled the settee seats. New varnish for the settee backs is on the list

  13. #293
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Had a setback while sailing with some friends last summer. I'm still not sure exactly how it happened, but we were crossing the wake of a passing ferry just as the main loaded up in gust , then - SNAP!! I was looking off to the side, so at first I didn't know what the sound was, but I knew something was bad. I then saw the crack running through the boom. About six feet long on both sides. It mostly ran along the seams until I guess the glue held well, and so the break continued up into the side walls. The underside also cracked across the face. We quickly dropped the main and sailed home on the jib. If the crack had extended up to the top of the boom and it had separated, it would have been a disaster. A cartwheeling, ten-foot-long loose cannon in 15 knots of wind clearing the decks would have been interesting. We were really lucky.





    You can see the rotten spot on the right, under the chafe guard, which is where I think the break started. This is close to the mainsheet bail.

    I had intended to refinish the boom, and simplify some of the rig (like taking those chafe guards off), so I wasn't that upset about it. Just one more thing. But once back at the dock, I took a closer look to see how it could be repaired and soon realized the extent of the damage. Even if it could be splined and patched and reglued, I would probably never really trust the integrity of it. So, since I'd never made a spar before, I decided I might as well figure out how to make one. I'd done this much - should probably learn that too
    Last edited by bdbFC; 03-01-2018 at 05:06 PM.

  14. #294
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    First task, once I detached the boom and took it home, was to remove the hardware and take measurements. I drilled a few large holes in various places to find the thicknesses and discover where the blocking was. It was a box section of 3/4" spruce, with glued butt joints - looked like resorcinol. The only blocking was about a foot near the goose neck and another at the tail end, the rest was hollow. It's straight on top, and arched underneath from 6" tall in the center to almost 3" on the ends. The width is about 4", tapering on each end. The only other complicated parts were a rounded support for the winches and the goose neck is a hollow "basket", so that would need to be carefully fitted. But overall, it seemed pretty straight forward to build.



    With some sawhorses and plywood, I made a work bench that would be long enough. (I ended up regretting that I didn't take the time to flatten and level the bench. During the build, it would have been really nice to have another reference for squaring things. It wasn't a huge deal, but it would have been nice.)
    The boom is almost 19feet. I had two 2x10 quarter-sawn spruce boards delivered for material, each a bit over 21' long. I asked to have them milled S&S on two sides. It was great to have the old boom there for reference.

    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:22 AM.

  15. #295
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I talked to another FC owner, who had his boom also break years ago. Based on that, I decided to make it a little beefier than original, in spite of the weight increase. Rather than just edge glued, I wanted to cut rabbets on the top and bottom boards for sidewall support and more surface area for the glue. And I wanted to add solid blocking at the main sheet bail, since that's where his boom failed also. I made the sidewalls thicker too, now an inch instead of 3/4". This also would allow me to build the boom as a straight rectangle box, and then shave down the sides for taper, rather than build a tapered top and bottom and then bending the sides to fit. It would also make fitting the blocking a piece of cake.

    Here's the new cross-section (not to scale):



    Each board would provide one sidewall and one top (or bottom). So I ripped those with a circular saw. Then I planed them to final square thickness.

    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:22 AM.

  16. #296
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    The sidewalls need to be arched on the bottom. I took measurements every 6 inches from the original, and then made a batten from the leftover bit of the 2x10 to average them all into a fair curve. These were clamped to finish nails.





    I used a jig saw to rough cut one of the sidewalls, and then electric and hand planed it to the line. After that, I clamped the other side to it and planed it down to match the first.





    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:22 AM.

  17. #297
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    For the top and bottom, I used a circular saw to cut the edges of the rabbets to depth, and then used a router to cut away the waste.



    Once I was sure the joints were square and that I could cleanly bend the bottom board along the arch, it was ready for glue up. I added the blocking to the ends and center, and planed it down to match the curve. Then came the epoxy and clamps. My girlfriend thankfully helped me. I don't think I could have done this part solo. The top and bottom were made slightly wider than the final thickness, which would be planed down to fit after the glue dried.

    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:21 AM.

  18. #298
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Before I tapered the sides while the ends were still square, I predrilled the holes for the bails and sheeves at the ends. These used thrubolts and rivets. The rest of the hardware would just screw in. I used a large caliper to transfer the side taper measurements from the original boom to the top and bottom boards. Once I was happy that I'd measured correctly (I felt like I checked 100 times.), I attached a curved batten to each side to use as a guide for planing. I would make pencil marks on the battens and the boom, and then just take many super-thin passes until the marks disappeared from the battens - moving towards the center and working my way backwards towards the ends. Then cleaned up with a sander.






  19. #299
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I rounded over the corners with a router, and spent a few hours carving the goose-neck tenon to fit the bronze piece - marking with chalk and fitting, rinse and repeat. Then before varnishing, I sanded down to 400.



    I don't have a photo, but to make the rounded support for the winches, I cut a dado across the bottom to fit a block, which I epoxied in and sanded to match the curvature. Then it was varnish time. 12 coats.


  20. #300
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    Last but not least, I cleaned up and reattached the hardware. I struggled a bit to figure out how to reattach the mainsheet bail. The rivet holes did not line up square at all and there was no play in the bail to move it around. I ended up clamping the bail, predrilling the far side holes just a little bit and inserted the old rivet as visual angle guide, and eye-balled it as I drilled the hole. It ended up working great.



    You can see how off the angles were. I used bronze rod for new rivets. The washers are used for spacers to leave the right amount of metal to peen over once cut.



    To rivet, I would peen one side first on the bench, insert it and hacksaw off the other end. Then I used a clamp to hold it in while I hammered the other side. A friend came over to check on things, and for the final fit, it was easier for us to hammer both sides at the same time.



    Here's a picture of the winch support.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 03-02-2018 at 03:24 PM.

  21. #301
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    And done! While untying it from the roof of my truck at the marina, I managed to walk right into the gooseneck with the bridge of my nose. So having made the proper blood sacrifice, my friend Chris helped reattach and fit the main. I opted to keep the main loose footed, so I didn't need to reattach the old sail tracks. I also opted to not reattach the vang bail, using a strop instead. Most of the clippers have this setup.



    Before cleaning up the dolphinite bedding.





    First test sail was on my birthday - fun day and the boom even worked! A really satisfying project.
    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:21 AM.

  22. #302
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    In October, we raced in the Jessica Cup. November and December were heavy travel months, so I wasn't able to do much for Hana until after the new year.




  23. #303
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    After the JCup race, I discovered that two of my bilge pumps had failed - one bad float switch, and one corroded wire connection that had gotten wet. I'd installed the pumps "temporarily" before the first launch, so it was well past time to do a proper job of it. Since that became first priority, I decided to focus on electrical before finishing the head restoration. In the past month or so, I rewired the bilge pumps to the panel switches, wired up the 12v distribution panel and volt meter, ran new wire for the nav lights, steaming light and anchor light plus configured junction boxes to make it easy to disconnect if I need to pull the mast again. I also ran coax and installed a new radio.



    It's still hard to believe that was acceptable to someone




    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:20 AM.

  24. #304
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    Default Re: Farallone Clipper #15 restoration

    I also got a first-hand illustration of how not to wire something. Way back when I installed the stern railing, I had run a small gauge wire through it to connect to the stern light. At the time, I didn't know much about 12v and just assumed because it was a short run, I could get close to the same size as the wire on the light. Wrong. Fast-forward a couple years now. I know the 6v running through nav light wire for the distance needs to be 14 to 12AWG, but I go with 10AWG to be on the safe side. I have fuses up near the bow. It's all set up to be ABYC compliant. But I don't even consider the wire I'd run through back at Spaulding - maybe thinking I'd already calculated the load properly back then or something. I don't know - I guess I wasn't thinking actually. Anyway, I made the connections, attached it to the panel, and turned it on. No stern light. So I go into the cabin to check the panel again.

    Hmm. That's funny. I think I smell something. I look at the panel, take a whiff, look aft, don't see anything. I look back at the panel again. Sniff, sniff. Hmm. I do smell something. I look back aft again. Holy *$#%! The cockpit was absolutely filled with white smoke. Either from a short, or the lamps total voltage, had instantly fried the wire and completely melted the insulation. I cut the power, checked for flame and got out of there until the smoke cleared.



    Won't do that again!
    Last edited by bdbFC; 07-16-2018 at 06:20 AM.

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