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Thread: Wood Trailers

  1. #1
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    Happy July 4 . . with boating prolific in America, most boats spending 90% of life on land, Yachtspeople need effective trailers


    Example: AWSA 35mph Ski Boat & Light Car



    Details:
    1 - Bow Latch - sole boat-trailer attachment
    2 - PumpFender tm deflects road spray from hull


    Edited by Mike Hofgren & Larry Hartley 7-28-99


    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  2. #2
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    Default

    Happy July 4 . . with boating prolific in America, most boats spending 90% of life on land, Yachtspeople need effective trailers


    Example: AWSA 35mph Ski Boat & Light Car



    Details:
    1 - Bow Latch - sole boat-trailer attachment
    2 - PumpFender tm deflects road spray from hull


    Edited by Mike Hofgren & Larry Hartley 7-28-99


    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  3. #3
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    Gainesville, Florida, USA
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    Default

    Happy July 4 . . with boating prolific in America, most boats spending 90% of life on land, Yachtspeople need effective trailers


    Example: AWSA 35mph Ski Boat & Light Car



    Details:
    1 - Bow Latch - sole boat-trailer attachment
    2 - PumpFender tm deflects road spray from hull


    Edited by Mike Hofgren & Larry Hartley 7-28-99


    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  4. #4
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    How much for a trailer? for a 13ft boat?

    thanks, Corey

  5. #5
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    How much for a trailer? for a 13ft boat?

    thanks, Corey

  6. #6
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    How much for a trailer? for a 13ft boat?

    thanks, Corey

  7. #7
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    '82-5 I built trailers that fit a 14 foot
    ski boat I built using place-and-bond plywood
    panelling build method (also called stitch & tape); leading to a (my) US Pat. describing a fiberglass boat trailer issued in 1988. 4,754,988 is primarily an OEM component, for fiberglass boat manufacture that has its' own commercial story not appropriate here.

    I've thought to publicise the method, which for wooden boats is time consuming, taking 1/3 to 1/2 the components and labor expense, as building a boat hull of that length.

    I think I'm an experienced boat/yachtsperson for my age.

    What seems to escape current (small, below 20 foot) boaters is that with all the time, and all the attention we place on designing, building, maintaining, restoring watercraft; in these times, unless you live on a body of water, - which many readers do, but by no means the same proportion of total boating readers, - your lovely boat while photographed, used and written about on water, in fact spends over 90% of it's time on land; - frequently and commonly on a steel trailer that is rather ugly and doesn't make it into the article about the boat.

    A wooden trailer that fits the wooden boat it carries is a joy to behold. It's very light, in fact the lightest practical conveyance (mass is critical to eliminate floating on tires most don't want). On small craft, say below 14 foot, the GVW of the rig is frequently 1/3 or more steel trailer. If you haul with a pickup, no problem. But folks with little cars, like a Honda CRX I have, might like to haul a small day sailer boat or jet ski. The jet skis I see are on steel trailers that weigh close to the same as the jet ski. (While jet skis aren't very 'yachtty'), small day sailers or a Penn Yan Swift are, and the percentage of over the road GVW for say an FJ or many of the small day sailers described in Wooden Boat, if they're trailered; - is half steel trailer . . . in some cases the trailer weighs more than the lovely little daysailer.

    Individual boatbuilding is commonly not done to save total expense, accepting materials expense and gratis owner-labor; that if it were calculated at ship or yacht building labor purchase rates, inclduing overhead, would end up with a vessel you could purchase complete cheaper than build it yourself - asuming your labor is that skilled.

    A one off including design of a wooden trailer would take the same cost and expense as the complete small boat such as an FJ daysailer or similar size runabout. The pleasure, if not delight of: 1. going down the road silently, only sensing the throttle load on the tow vehicle - which is considerably less - no more bucket of bolts going down the road you have now. 2. for the ammount of overland travel, because of properly sized rubber torsion axle, incurring virtually zero hull, engine, electonics damage and 3. if you hose it down or wash as you do the hull and photograph it at a park, or in your driveway after you mowed the lawn; of having something that looks as lovely - ship shape and Bristol fashion - as the boat it carries. Matching car wheel trim ya-dah, ya-dah, ya-dah.

    A wooden trailer is the Yachtsman's Yacht club, at home. Your yachting experience of perfected marine equipment starts when you hitch it to the car. . . no more bucket of bolts moving down the road.

    I initiated and own a fiberglass boat manufacturing method the U.S. Patent Office chose to cover with U.S. 4,754,988. If from this writing confrimed to me for your own single purpose use at P.O. Box 90100, Gainesville, Florida 32607 USA, I declare you or any reader who confirms such singular personal use - not for resale - may use 4,754,988 to build a trailer for their own use. You'll need a rubber torsion axle and radial tires (the latter if I have anything to do with it) - both commonly available.

    Sincerely, Mike Hofgren, Originator, Owner, U.S. 4,754,988; - communicating a boating delight I haven't seen anywhere else.





  8. #8
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    '82-5 I built trailers that fit a 14 foot
    ski boat I built using place-and-bond plywood
    panelling build method (also called stitch & tape); leading to a (my) US Pat. describing a fiberglass boat trailer issued in 1988. 4,754,988 is primarily an OEM component, for fiberglass boat manufacture that has its' own commercial story not appropriate here.

    I've thought to publicise the method, which for wooden boats is time consuming, taking 1/3 to 1/2 the components and labor expense, as building a boat hull of that length.

    I think I'm an experienced boat/yachtsperson for my age.

    What seems to escape current (small, below 20 foot) boaters is that with all the time, and all the attention we place on designing, building, maintaining, restoring watercraft; in these times, unless you live on a body of water, - which many readers do, but by no means the same proportion of total boating readers, - your lovely boat while photographed, used and written about on water, in fact spends over 90% of it's time on land; - frequently and commonly on a steel trailer that is rather ugly and doesn't make it into the article about the boat.

    A wooden trailer that fits the wooden boat it carries is a joy to behold. It's very light, in fact the lightest practical conveyance (mass is critical to eliminate floating on tires most don't want). On small craft, say below 14 foot, the GVW of the rig is frequently 1/3 or more steel trailer. If you haul with a pickup, no problem. But folks with little cars, like a Honda CRX I have, might like to haul a small day sailer boat or jet ski. The jet skis I see are on steel trailers that weigh close to the same as the jet ski. (While jet skis aren't very 'yachtty'), small day sailers or a Penn Yan Swift are, and the percentage of over the road GVW for say an FJ or many of the small day sailers described in Wooden Boat, if they're trailered; - is half steel trailer . . . in some cases the trailer weighs more than the lovely little daysailer.

    Individual boatbuilding is commonly not done to save total expense, accepting materials expense and gratis owner-labor; that if it were calculated at ship or yacht building labor purchase rates, inclduing overhead, would end up with a vessel you could purchase complete cheaper than build it yourself - asuming your labor is that skilled.

    A one off including design of a wooden trailer would take the same cost and expense as the complete small boat such as an FJ daysailer or similar size runabout. The pleasure, if not delight of: 1. going down the road silently, only sensing the throttle load on the tow vehicle - which is considerably less - no more bucket of bolts going down the road you have now. 2. for the ammount of overland travel, because of properly sized rubber torsion axle, incurring virtually zero hull, engine, electonics damage and 3. if you hose it down or wash as you do the hull and photograph it at a park, or in your driveway after you mowed the lawn; of having something that looks as lovely - ship shape and Bristol fashion - as the boat it carries. Matching car wheel trim ya-dah, ya-dah, ya-dah.

    A wooden trailer is the Yachtsman's Yacht club, at home. Your yachting experience of perfected marine equipment starts when you hitch it to the car. . . no more bucket of bolts moving down the road.

    I initiated and own a fiberglass boat manufacturing method the U.S. Patent Office chose to cover with U.S. 4,754,988. If from this writing confrimed to me for your own single purpose use at P.O. Box 90100, Gainesville, Florida 32607 USA, I declare you or any reader who confirms such singular personal use - not for resale - may use 4,754,988 to build a trailer for their own use. You'll need a rubber torsion axle and radial tires (the latter if I have anything to do with it) - both commonly available.

    Sincerely, Mike Hofgren, Originator, Owner, U.S. 4,754,988; - communicating a boating delight I haven't seen anywhere else.





  9. #9
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    Default

    '82-5 I built trailers that fit a 14 foot
    ski boat I built using place-and-bond plywood
    panelling build method (also called stitch & tape); leading to a (my) US Pat. describing a fiberglass boat trailer issued in 1988. 4,754,988 is primarily an OEM component, for fiberglass boat manufacture that has its' own commercial story not appropriate here.

    I've thought to publicise the method, which for wooden boats is time consuming, taking 1/3 to 1/2 the components and labor expense, as building a boat hull of that length.

    I think I'm an experienced boat/yachtsperson for my age.

    What seems to escape current (small, below 20 foot) boaters is that with all the time, and all the attention we place on designing, building, maintaining, restoring watercraft; in these times, unless you live on a body of water, - which many readers do, but by no means the same proportion of total boating readers, - your lovely boat while photographed, used and written about on water, in fact spends over 90% of it's time on land; - frequently and commonly on a steel trailer that is rather ugly and doesn't make it into the article about the boat.

    A wooden trailer that fits the wooden boat it carries is a joy to behold. It's very light, in fact the lightest practical conveyance (mass is critical to eliminate floating on tires most don't want). On small craft, say below 14 foot, the GVW of the rig is frequently 1/3 or more steel trailer. If you haul with a pickup, no problem. But folks with little cars, like a Honda CRX I have, might like to haul a small day sailer boat or jet ski. The jet skis I see are on steel trailers that weigh close to the same as the jet ski. (While jet skis aren't very 'yachtty'), small day sailers or a Penn Yan Swift are, and the percentage of over the road GVW for say an FJ or many of the small day sailers described in Wooden Boat, if they're trailered; - is half steel trailer . . . in some cases the trailer weighs more than the lovely little daysailer.

    Individual boatbuilding is commonly not done to save total expense, accepting materials expense and gratis owner-labor; that if it were calculated at ship or yacht building labor purchase rates, inclduing overhead, would end up with a vessel you could purchase complete cheaper than build it yourself - asuming your labor is that skilled.

    A one off including design of a wooden trailer would take the same cost and expense as the complete small boat such as an FJ daysailer or similar size runabout. The pleasure, if not delight of: 1. going down the road silently, only sensing the throttle load on the tow vehicle - which is considerably less - no more bucket of bolts going down the road you have now. 2. for the ammount of overland travel, because of properly sized rubber torsion axle, incurring virtually zero hull, engine, electonics damage and 3. if you hose it down or wash as you do the hull and photograph it at a park, or in your driveway after you mowed the lawn; of having something that looks as lovely - ship shape and Bristol fashion - as the boat it carries. Matching car wheel trim ya-dah, ya-dah, ya-dah.

    A wooden trailer is the Yachtsman's Yacht club, at home. Your yachting experience of perfected marine equipment starts when you hitch it to the car. . . no more bucket of bolts moving down the road.

    I initiated and own a fiberglass boat manufacturing method the U.S. Patent Office chose to cover with U.S. 4,754,988. If from this writing confrimed to me for your own single purpose use at P.O. Box 90100, Gainesville, Florida 32607 USA, I declare you or any reader who confirms such singular personal use - not for resale - may use 4,754,988 to build a trailer for their own use. You'll need a rubber torsion axle and radial tires (the latter if I have anything to do with it) - both commonly available.

    Sincerely, Mike Hofgren, Originator, Owner, U.S. 4,754,988; - communicating a boating delight I haven't seen anywhere else.





  10. #10
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    Woodenboat #102, p.82 has an article on how to make your own wooden trailer for your wooden boat. There is also a pamphlet/booklet available from Glen-L on making trailers though I'm unsure whether the Glen-L trailers are wooden or metal. Also, try plugging "trailer" into the WB back issue search engine at this site and you'll find a number of other articles about trailers.

    Interesting thread so far.

  11. #11
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    Woodenboat #102, p.82 has an article on how to make your own wooden trailer for your wooden boat. There is also a pamphlet/booklet available from Glen-L on making trailers though I'm unsure whether the Glen-L trailers are wooden or metal. Also, try plugging "trailer" into the WB back issue search engine at this site and you'll find a number of other articles about trailers.

    Interesting thread so far.

  12. #12
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    Woodenboat #102, p.82 has an article on how to make your own wooden trailer for your wooden boat. There is also a pamphlet/booklet available from Glen-L on making trailers though I'm unsure whether the Glen-L trailers are wooden or metal. Also, try plugging "trailer" into the WB back issue search engine at this site and you'll find a number of other articles about trailers.

    Interesting thread so far.

  13. #13
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    Now why didn't I think of that!

    A wooden trailer for my wooden boat.

    Any plans for a kayak trailer

    SWIFTWOOD will fold up 'sort' of like this
    ( sorry for the fiberglass boat! )


    only it's this big



    [This message has been edited by BrianCunningham (edited 07-07-99).]

  14. #14
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    Now why didn't I think of that!

    A wooden trailer for my wooden boat.

    Any plans for a kayak trailer

    SWIFTWOOD will fold up 'sort' of like this
    ( sorry for the fiberglass boat! )


    only it's this big



    [This message has been edited by BrianCunningham (edited 07-07-99).]

  15. #15
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    Now why didn't I think of that!

    A wooden trailer for my wooden boat.

    Any plans for a kayak trailer

    SWIFTWOOD will fold up 'sort' of like this
    ( sorry for the fiberglass boat! )


    only it's this big



    [This message has been edited by BrianCunningham (edited 07-07-99).]

  16. #16
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    Brian--I can't think of why the wooden trailer described in WB wouldn't work just fine for your "triyak" (trimaran-kayak ). It even has wooden fenders! I think you could alter the dimensions to suit your boat. Check it out, and of course if you build one, we're going to expect to see photos of it here at the forum!!


  17. #17
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    Brian--I can't think of why the wooden trailer described in WB wouldn't work just fine for your "triyak" (trimaran-kayak ). It even has wooden fenders! I think you could alter the dimensions to suit your boat. Check it out, and of course if you build one, we're going to expect to see photos of it here at the forum!!


  18. #18
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    Brian--I can't think of why the wooden trailer described in WB wouldn't work just fine for your "triyak" (trimaran-kayak ). It even has wooden fenders! I think you could alter the dimensions to suit your boat. Check it out, and of course if you build one, we're going to expect to see photos of it here at the forum!!


  19. #19
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    Brian
    This is monohull. Your Seayak seems a candidate for a roof rack you may already
    have done, a good new subject.

  20. #20
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    Brian
    This is monohull. Your Seayak seems a candidate for a roof rack you may already
    have done, a good new subject.

  21. #21
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    Brian
    This is monohull. Your Seayak seems a candidate for a roof rack you may already
    have done, a good new subject.

  22. #22
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    John Gearing

    Glen L speaks at their website about welding skill to build their trailers, I assume are steel. Didn't/unable access WB info you mention. This is more than pamphlet for some of us John, who think its man's change of man-made material.

    Had notable experience welding fiberglass pulltrusions. Constant #1 - fiberglass pulltrusions can't be altered as steel can by heating and forming or stamping.

    Will post photo of lovely-for-us, frequent-Interstate-thumbs-up (how often does one get that pulling a trailer boat) 14 foot ski boat trailered 10,000 + miles from Minnesota to Florida to Minnesota to Florida. Had pulltruded 2 x 2 springs; learned you need major automotive research budget to resolve, finally likely ending in eyeballs pricing. Settled on common OEM rubber torsion axle giving very soft ride. Leaf springs have the only benefit of being cheap. They destroy; hull, electronics, engine. Boating quality ends at rampside where you re-enter the stone age.

    BUT . . rubber torsion axle opens the floating on tires subject . . hot dog 20'+ boats frequently haul on trailers that float on tires. Most Intercoastal ramps have side current, hauling in dead calm is unususal . . you could have a 20 foot high poratable wind and water dam you place around the boat, trailer and tow vehicle. Axle weight, tire bouyancy (I have a table for common tires) are important wood trailer criteria. If it floats, you need a tow vehicle bumper-to-trailer neck stay that either flexes when towing, or can be easily hitched-unhitched at the ramp. A floating trailer doesn't need a haul winch, only a light tie down winch. Hauling is a piece of cake: place and haul at 10 mph or the posted ramp speed.

    Another key design area is load transfer from the wood / fiberglass reinforced trailer neck to tow ball. You could have a shop stamp out stainless hitches at an absurd price. A carbon fiber hicth is possible, price also absurd.

    Solution: 1/2 gage (about 14-16 ga.)tangs 3 times the hitch surface area, welded to the hitch enabling bonding and load transfer of the hitch to the wood neck.
    - - + + - -

    Optimum wood trailers that haul the boat out of the water effectively use (my) U.S. 4,892,421 teaching a cost effecive composite antifriction bearing - the trailer main roller . . giving antifriction perfomance while digesting sand with nil degeneration, salt water immersible.

    . . more

    iron Mike


  23. #23
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    John Gearing

    Glen L speaks at their website about welding skill to build their trailers, I assume are steel. Didn't/unable access WB info you mention. This is more than pamphlet for some of us John, who think its man's change of man-made material.

    Had notable experience welding fiberglass pulltrusions. Constant #1 - fiberglass pulltrusions can't be altered as steel can by heating and forming or stamping.

    Will post photo of lovely-for-us, frequent-Interstate-thumbs-up (how often does one get that pulling a trailer boat) 14 foot ski boat trailered 10,000 + miles from Minnesota to Florida to Minnesota to Florida. Had pulltruded 2 x 2 springs; learned you need major automotive research budget to resolve, finally likely ending in eyeballs pricing. Settled on common OEM rubber torsion axle giving very soft ride. Leaf springs have the only benefit of being cheap. They destroy; hull, electronics, engine. Boating quality ends at rampside where you re-enter the stone age.

    BUT . . rubber torsion axle opens the floating on tires subject . . hot dog 20'+ boats frequently haul on trailers that float on tires. Most Intercoastal ramps have side current, hauling in dead calm is unususal . . you could have a 20 foot high poratable wind and water dam you place around the boat, trailer and tow vehicle. Axle weight, tire bouyancy (I have a table for common tires) are important wood trailer criteria. If it floats, you need a tow vehicle bumper-to-trailer neck stay that either flexes when towing, or can be easily hitched-unhitched at the ramp. A floating trailer doesn't need a haul winch, only a light tie down winch. Hauling is a piece of cake: place and haul at 10 mph or the posted ramp speed.

    Another key design area is load transfer from the wood / fiberglass reinforced trailer neck to tow ball. You could have a shop stamp out stainless hitches at an absurd price. A carbon fiber hicth is possible, price also absurd.

    Solution: 1/2 gage (about 14-16 ga.)tangs 3 times the hitch surface area, welded to the hitch enabling bonding and load transfer of the hitch to the wood neck.
    - - + + - -

    Optimum wood trailers that haul the boat out of the water effectively use (my) U.S. 4,892,421 teaching a cost effecive composite antifriction bearing - the trailer main roller . . giving antifriction perfomance while digesting sand with nil degeneration, salt water immersible.

    . . more

    iron Mike


  24. #24
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    Default

    John Gearing

    Glen L speaks at their website about welding skill to build their trailers, I assume are steel. Didn't/unable access WB info you mention. This is more than pamphlet for some of us John, who think its man's change of man-made material.

    Had notable experience welding fiberglass pulltrusions. Constant #1 - fiberglass pulltrusions can't be altered as steel can by heating and forming or stamping.

    Will post photo of lovely-for-us, frequent-Interstate-thumbs-up (how often does one get that pulling a trailer boat) 14 foot ski boat trailered 10,000 + miles from Minnesota to Florida to Minnesota to Florida. Had pulltruded 2 x 2 springs; learned you need major automotive research budget to resolve, finally likely ending in eyeballs pricing. Settled on common OEM rubber torsion axle giving very soft ride. Leaf springs have the only benefit of being cheap. They destroy; hull, electronics, engine. Boating quality ends at rampside where you re-enter the stone age.

    BUT . . rubber torsion axle opens the floating on tires subject . . hot dog 20'+ boats frequently haul on trailers that float on tires. Most Intercoastal ramps have side current, hauling in dead calm is unususal . . you could have a 20 foot high poratable wind and water dam you place around the boat, trailer and tow vehicle. Axle weight, tire bouyancy (I have a table for common tires) are important wood trailer criteria. If it floats, you need a tow vehicle bumper-to-trailer neck stay that either flexes when towing, or can be easily hitched-unhitched at the ramp. A floating trailer doesn't need a haul winch, only a light tie down winch. Hauling is a piece of cake: place and haul at 10 mph or the posted ramp speed.

    Another key design area is load transfer from the wood / fiberglass reinforced trailer neck to tow ball. You could have a shop stamp out stainless hitches at an absurd price. A carbon fiber hicth is possible, price also absurd.

    Solution: 1/2 gage (about 14-16 ga.)tangs 3 times the hitch surface area, welded to the hitch enabling bonding and load transfer of the hitch to the wood neck.
    - - + + - -

    Optimum wood trailers that haul the boat out of the water effectively use (my) U.S. 4,892,421 teaching a cost effecive composite antifriction bearing - the trailer main roller . . giving antifriction perfomance while digesting sand with nil degeneration, salt water immersible.

    . . more

    iron Mike


  25. #25
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    - - at last, yachtpeople's trailers - yachtquality ashore !!

    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  26. #26
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    - - at last, yachtpeople's trailers - yachtquality ashore !!

    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  27. #27
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    - - at last, yachtpeople's trailers - yachtquality ashore !!

    [This message has been edited by Mike Hofgren (edited 07-28-99).]

  28. #28
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    I am buuilding a 14 ft wooden boat.I would like to obtain information on you plans for a trailer.Please send e-mail about proper procedure for information desired and offered by you on WBForum. thank you

  29. #29
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    I am buuilding a 14 ft wooden boat.I would like to obtain information on you plans for a trailer.Please send e-mail about proper procedure for information desired and offered by you on WBForum. thank you

  30. #30
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    I am buuilding a 14 ft wooden boat.I would like to obtain information on you plans for a trailer.Please send e-mail about proper procedure for information desired and offered by you on WBForum. thank you

  31. #31
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    Iron Mike,
    Are ther any pix of the trailer alone? Is it essentially like a steel trailer but scantlings increased for the wood members. The pix you posted seem to show plenty of bolts. How is it not a "bucket of bolts"?
    And what in the world is a "pump fender"?

  32. #32
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    Iron Mike,
    Are ther any pix of the trailer alone? Is it essentially like a steel trailer but scantlings increased for the wood members. The pix you posted seem to show plenty of bolts. How is it not a "bucket of bolts"?
    And what in the world is a "pump fender"?

  33. #33
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    Iron Mike,
    Are ther any pix of the trailer alone? Is it essentially like a steel trailer but scantlings increased for the wood members. The pix you posted seem to show plenty of bolts. How is it not a "bucket of bolts"?
    And what in the world is a "pump fender"?

  34. #34
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    67

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    I built a wooden stake-body trailer some years ago using a laminated plywood tongue and frame, plywood flatbed and varnished yellow-pine stake panels. In fact everything was varnished. It looked really great and worked well for a long time. The flat-bed body was mounted on a Honda "roller-skate" rear axle (that was the Honda 800 I believe it was called; a two-cylinder auto that was Honda's first entry into the American automotive arena). The tongue eventually fatigued just where the flat bed body attached to it. My mistakes were that, while I laminated the plywood vertically, I did not add a cap and a bottom to stiffen it a little more and did not elevate the flat-bed body above the tongue and frame to avoid the stress spot. I still have the axle and I will build another one soon for my sailing pram dinghy.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Posts
    67

    Default

    I built a wooden stake-body trailer some years ago using a laminated plywood tongue and frame, plywood flatbed and varnished yellow-pine stake panels. In fact everything was varnished. It looked really great and worked well for a long time. The flat-bed body was mounted on a Honda "roller-skate" rear axle (that was the Honda 800 I believe it was called; a two-cylinder auto that was Honda's first entry into the American automotive arena). The tongue eventually fatigued just where the flat bed body attached to it. My mistakes were that, while I laminated the plywood vertically, I did not add a cap and a bottom to stiffen it a little more and did not elevate the flat-bed body above the tongue and frame to avoid the stress spot. I still have the axle and I will build another one soon for my sailing pram dinghy.

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