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Thread: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

  1. #1

    Default Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    I am a P.C./ Cape Kiwanda doryman. I found this project in the an open equipment shed at a small farm near Tillamook, Oregon, 20 miles fromPacific City, the home of the Dory Fleet. The boat was built around 1958, and is the actual prototype and the first of the new breed of surf dory that changed a culture, When the first two TEXAN square stern dories showed up at the Pacific City Dory Derby in 1958, They dominated and easily won the Derby. Ironically, first prize was a brand new double end dory.

    Five years later, in spite of quite a number of naysayers, there were at least a half dozen manufacturers cranking the new dory type out as fast as possible. This revolution led to the unlikely event of Pacific City, a port without a port, becoming the highest salmon producer, for a while during the salmon boom of the 70s.





    The only reason that I found this piece of History, is that I had always been interested in the TEXAN dories, because I remembered them from the period, and my father was a close friend of one of the builders. Dad and I discussed the boat many times during the next 40+ years, we really liked the clean simple lines and especially liked the extremely efficient use of material. Dad called the design elegant, and I agree.

    I knew that one of the two original builder/designers was still around, Stan Kephart is well into his eighties and wouldn't be with us forever. I did not know him personally, but knowing that if I was ever going to build a TEXAN type dory, I needed to quit procrastinating, and talk to him. So one day, I just drove down his driveway, and knocked on his door. I told him of my interest, and asked if he had any type of drawings or measurements... I was quite sure that the last example had been burned several years back, and I was kicking my butt for not measuring the boat...To my surprise, Stan lights up, and says, no, but there is one in Fred's shed a mile down the road. Fred Wyss, Stan's best friend and co-designer/builder had died in 1979 and the boat had been there since...He asked me if I wanted to check it out.? The family is selling the farm and that boat has to go.

    I ended up taking the TEXAN II home...A year and a half later, I am laid off work, and getting a good start on the project.


    Last edited by Joe Evens; 01-15-2015 at 04:11 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Good job! you took the chance!! Have fun!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Man I wish we could get more plywood like that out of Roseburg Lumber. That stuff sure was pretty.

    As the project progresses, I'll be curious about the scantlings and how strong she ends up when completely refurbished. I've always thought PC dories were over-framed from the 1970's thoughts on construction, and a little lighter would save not only weight but construction time and labor.

    Looking forward to more Joe.

    E

  4. #4

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II



    I messed the pics up a bit, but I will try to fix things. One duplicate, one missing, no spaces between.

    The pic with paint is when I got it home and washed away 35 years of dust and dirt.

    The rest are after paint removal and some extra fasteners are set in pilot holes, The old fasteners, Si Bronze ringshanks, check out OK, but It seems a little underfastened to me, and I can feel a bit of flex, torsionally, when I lift it from a stern corner. The bottom and stern will get a couple hundred screws, as well. It seems like they were running out of nails, with wider spacing, and irregularities in size toward the stern, A few more won't hurt.

    I will epoxy glass the bottom, and to the top of that exterior chine log. Probably just paint on the sides and inside. That 57 year old paint was in pretty good shape, somewhat better on the inside of the boat.

    The TEXAN II was used pretty much continuously for about 18 years. Then
    parked in a gravel floor shed, open to the north.

    I have found no rotted wood on this boat, just two hand sized delams, inside the fishbox, It was built entirely of Doug fir plywood and old growth spruce

    It was always pulled into that shed, but I am certain that it was often wet when it was parked.

    The boat currently weighs 676 LB. It has a 7/8 inch bottom. One layer of 1/2 in, with another run of 3/8 in added later on, after some damage.
    JE

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    That i so cool. As a native of Oregon I hve a soft spot for these boats, and saving this one for history is worth it. It is interesting that the boat has an external chine log and is framed. I haven't seem that before. Is there some purpose other than expedited construction?
    Ron

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Great find. Will look forward to more of the story...

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Great story!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    The design, and the builders

    The new type of dory was designed and built by Fred Wyss and Stan Kephart., in the mid to late 1950's, two amateur builders. It was an evolution of the standard dory of the day, a very capable, double end, displacement type. These boats were fully evolved, with George Calkins, Paul Hanneman, and others, building boats, as needed. Stan and Fred had their own ideas, and tweaked this classic type. into a whole new boat, making the quantum leap from a full displacement boat to a fast planing type and ending an era, and beginning the next.

    The chronology, as near as I have been able to discover, went about like this,,,Their first boat, named TEXAN was not a great success, due to some handling issues, probably caused by too much flare. My boat, the TEXAN II, was originally built with some rocker, about 1.5 in. from the front of the well to the stern. The theory was that they would need the rocker so the boat would rise easily over the breakers. The result was a faster, roomier boat that handled well, but still pulled down at the stern at high power. This was soon changed to a full flat bottom with the addition of the wedge clearly visible in the pictures.

    Early in it's life, the TEXAN II split the 1/2 inch bottom up in the bow, after a 20 ft drop off of a big breaker after launch. This created the opportunity to change the design to full flat, by repairing the boat with the additional piece of 3/8 ply on the bottom, and the stern modification.

    This transformed the boat into exactly what they were looking for. It was fast, easily outrunning any breaker, and handled like a boat should.

    They built a new boat for Stan, retiring the original TEXAN and giving the name to the new boat. There were at least two more built, one for Dad's friend, Dave Curtis, and another super light boat for Stan.


    Not exactly work boats, these were sport fishing boats, and a large part of the quick evolution was driven by racing.

    The Dory Derby was a pretty big event from the late 50s, thru the 70s. All classes and types of racing, with many prizes, and prestige for the winners. It was very competitive, and often extreme. By the early 60s, there were quite a few of the new type, being pushed to their limit and beyond, by the major builders of the day, who were vying for market share. It took a 40 mph boat and a very aggressive crew to win the power races. Speed was also important for the fishing events.

    Stan remained competitive with his new race boat. This boat had 1/4 inch sides, and a 50 hp, transom mounted outboard, The lifting strakes, visible on the picture with the boat outside, on the sides were angled downward, and with the three slats on the bottom, it went around corners like it was on rails.

    The basic design, was 3/8 inch sides and I/2 inch bottom, on 1 inch by 2.5 inch frames, spaced at 15 inches.

    One thing that I really attracted by is the design philosophy. It was based on extremely efficient use of material. Two sheets of the readily available 4 ft by 20 ft DF marine plywood.

    The bottom was one sheet of 1/2, and the 3/8 for the sides was ripped to 2 ft by 20 ft. A full 1 inch by 8 inch board, was shiplapped and bonded over the plywood at the sheer, This piece was capped with a 3/8 by 1 inch sacrificial wood. This, combined with a 3/4 by 2 inch sheer clamp with 1/4 inch carriage bolts, made for a nice strong sheer line,

    The two full width fishbox / seats and bow cover finished the boat, giving the boat it's 32 inch sides, and adding much strength. The transom was treated similarly, but with a 1.5 by 12 in board lapped over the 1 inch of plywood, for a raised transom.

    That exterior chine log is in addition to the standard inside chine log. They are both 1 by 2 inch and both are fully bonded to the bottom and sides and heavily nailed... Bomb proof

    All scantlings are clear, tight grain, old growth spruce

    Beam is 6 ft 7 in.


    Regarding efficient use of material,... I am willing to crawl out on a limb here, and say that this design delivers the most boat that be built with six sheets of todays plywood.

    Not bad for a couple of amateurs and first time builders.

    This basic 4 by 20 foot planform remained the standard dory for close to 10 years. A new hull still sold for less than $500 until about 1967, when 5 by 20 ft boats became the standard for sport fishing, and the 5 1/2 and 6 ft bottom by 22 ft became the standard for commercial fishing.

    When Dad and I picked up our new 5 1/2 by 22 ft boat from P.C. Boatworks in January 1968 we got the last one at the old price of $645. The next one out of that shop was $745. These boats were very nice mahogany plywood boats built by Vic Ferrington, a true Boatwright.

    The real reason that these boats, built by the hundreds, for commercial fishing did not stand the test of time is that a good fisherman could pay for his whole outfit in a few trips, and the crappy fishermen lost interest quickly, and most were simply left outside to rot. If washed out and parked under cover between uses, these dories are still sound, 40 and 50 years later.


    A new friend recently found a regularly used, but nearly perfect 1968 5 by 20 ft P.C Boatworks dory. Like The TEXAN, it has no fiberglass, and was just painted outside and inside. It was parked under cover.

    The fiberglass treatment does help extend the life of boats left out in the weather when the boat soup inside treatment is maintained. It also absorbs exterior abuse.
    JE




    Last edited by Joe Evens; 01-15-2015 at 04:45 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Great boat & project! I really like an outboard well, they don't get enough credit and 'good press'.
    I'm fairly certain I remember reading about them in "National Fisherman" back in the 70's.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Last night I spent about 3/4 hour crawling around under the boat, scraping paint out of corners and trying to determine if the plywood was bonded to the frames.

    I am pretty sure that they weren't bonded, I found several small areas up in the bottom that I could get a .010 feeler gauge between the plywood and the frames, but .016 would not fit.

    Although the paint has a hairline crack along some of those inside corners where frame meets ply, there were no places that I could slip a gauge into. Most of those corners still have the paint filet intact.

    Over all, I would say that the boat is still pretty tight.

    There are four bottom frames sistered, Two on the two frames that cracked slightly when they cracked the bottom, and one across the bottom fore and aft of the damage.

    The sisters, with the extra 3/8 plywood on the bottom have added maybe 100 lb to the designed weight. Wild guess. It is what it is. That would put the standard weight of the design with a 1/2 inch bottom, at well under 600 lb.
    JE

  11. #11

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    A couple of more pics showing some inside detail, and a better shot of the lifting strakes at the stern.







    The pic below is for those folks who don't fully understand what these dories were designed for and routinely do. This was a day last winter, in HUMBLE PIE II, a Learned boat. This surf is approaching the high end by today's standards, but not unusual. If and when mistakes are made, from bad timing of the sets, or whether or not to charge the wave and get there before it breaks, or hang back hoping that it breaks before it gets to you, you can get very wet or even get in serious trouble. We all get it wrong from time to time. This is the second of several waves. The picture of the first wave was discarded because pictures are pretty meaningless if you can't see the boat.

    I know that Bruce looks bored, but I don't think he was.

    This wall will get several feet taller before it breaks.

    It did occur to me after seeing this picture that we probably should have donned our PFD's.

    Back in the day, we would launch when the smallest sets were larger than this, and the big ones were pushing 20 feet. There is potential for big trouble.

    In spite of the apparent danger, this is the safest port that I know of. We have been launching and landing here for over 100 years. We have no coast guard. Many hundreds of thousand launches.

    I am aware of three drownings, only one at the launch area. The other two were up or down the coast in heavy fog and no electronics.

    A large part of this safety record is due to these superb, and extremely capable dories.



    A few of the gussets are loose, and they are somewhat beat up from traffic. I plan to take them off, cut new ones, and properly bond them to the frames, and build new floorboards.

    I will also build new strakes, and likely add a spray rail forward, possibly by extending the strakes similar to a Bartender.

    This dory has a short shaft well. I haven't decided what do here. Shortshaft motors are getting rare, and freeboard is reduced.

    However, there are some advantages to a shortshaft. With this well, the motor tilts within the boat, nice for a prop check. A shorty also balances better, making tilting and trimming noticeably easier. A big flexible flap is hung from the top of the cutout. This greatly reduces the geyser into the boat when the boat is dropped into the surf.

    There is another advantage to a shortshaft well, that I have never seen discussed online, and a few of us old time dorymen know from experience. This is that if and when you take a really big wave and put a lot of water onboard, you can send it back out quite quickly thru the well, with some judicious throttle management. I recall taking well over foot of water down to 6 inches or so fairly quickly, far faster than a bilge pump. Just carefully add throttle, keeping the water between the top of the well and the powerhead, while getting out of the danger zone.
    Last edited by Joe Evens; 01-06-2015 at 08:01 PM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Thanks for sharing the historical background and photos of your boat. I bet she'll look super when you get her spruced up!
    Cheers
    Gord
    G. Rowe (Bayman)

  13. #13

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Indeed, This plywood is feels rock hard. It must have been pressed at extreme pressure. The factory scarfs are visible in the pictures, but cannot be detected by touch.


    Today, I will see what it takes to smooth the bottom. I raised a lot of grain scraping that mustard colored coating off the plywood.

    Does anyone have any idea what that bottom coating is? If I could find more of that stuff, I wouldn't even glass the bottom. It was thin, hard, flexible and tough. 50 years later, it was still serviceable, In the pics, the end grain of the bottom is visible thru the coating, yet sealed. There are a couple of rock dents in the bow, and even these remained apparently sealed. It did cut thru in that sharp dent in the outer chine log.

    This boat had slats on the bottom, and there was some damage on them, but seal from the sides of these, to the bottom was intact, It was necessary to cut the filet with a razor knife to remove these boards.

    Nuff said, tuff stuff indeed.
    JE

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Thanks so much for sharing, good luck and great find!

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    http://www.ifish.net/board/showthrea...57#post9188057

    Some more of the story, and pics, on Ifish, The salty dogs, Where it started.
    JE

  16. #16

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    When I walk in the shop, at the angle that I see the boat, that stern, although not rounded, sure reminds me of a Simmons Sea Skiff.

    I know that this boat is an evolution of the local double end surf boat, but these builders, although amateurs and first time builders, had obviously done their homework. I am thinking that while they were dreaming this new design up, that in some boat magazine of the mid 50's, they saw a write up about the SSS and adapted a very similar strategy.

    Also, strange but true, when they modified the stern to remove the rocker, (easily visible in the pictures) about 1/8 to 3/16 inch of hook was built in from the front of the well, aft. I'm pretty sure that if it as a mistake, it would have been corrected. You can't miss it, and that mod was done with care and attention to detail.
    JE
    Last edited by Joe Evens; 01-09-2015 at 06:13 PM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II



    Additional fasteners on bottom, 137 screws, set in tapered, countersunk, epoxy filled pilot holes, ready to drive. Not the best time for your only viable driver to go into hiding. (it was found on one of those stacks of lumber in the rafters} I got the task finished, but earned it. .One shot, straightening once to change batteries. It has always been my wont to bite off more than I can chew, Some day, I will succeed.
    JE

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Joe, check your PM's

    E

  19. #19

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Evens View Post
    Indeed, This plywood is feels rock hard. It must have been pressed at extreme pressure. The factory scarfs are visible in the pictures, but cannot be detected by touch.


    Today, I will see what it takes to smooth the bottom. I raised a lot of grain scraping that mustard colored coating off the plywood.

    Does anyone have any idea what that bottom coating is? If I could find more of that stuff, I wouldn't even glass the bottom. It was thin, hard, flexible and tough. 50 years later, it was still serviceable, In the pics, the end grain of the bottom is visible thru the coating, yet sealed. There are a couple of rock dents in the bow, and even these remained apparently sealed. It did cut thru in that sharp dent in the outer chine log.

    This boat had slats on the bottom, and there was some damage on them, but seal from the sides of these, to the bottom was intact, It was necessary to cut the filet with a razor knife to remove these boards.

    Nuff said, tuff stuff indeed.
    JE
    It is now clear that the coating on the bottom was applied much later. There were several areas filled with a fairing compound. These were filling rock dents, which makes sense. Both of the designer/builders lived on the upper tidewater of the Trask River and were avid salmon and steelhead anglers. Stan said that one of the primary uses of the boat was as a drift boat, by running from home, as far upriver as possible, and drift fishing back.

    Another good story was about the day that he ran upriver to the hatchery with the river at full flood, an extreme event that happens yearly. The river was churning, full of logs and debris. Asked why, he just grinned and said,.. Because I could.
    JE

  20. #20

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Although I have done some research, I am new to this restoration game, and prefer to learn the easy way. So far, I have been pretty inefficient. There are some daunting tasks coming up, and good ideas/techniques to help resolve them would be appreciated.

    Cleaning the old paint out of those inside corners at the exterior chine log and the plank above is a PITA. The plywood is hard and the spruce is soft and gouges easily. Inside the boat there will be a similar, but much more difficult and extensive situation where the frames intersect plywood. So far I haven't found or invented the right tool.

    Ideas?

    Another one is how to remove that old and often loose paint from all those nail dimples. I know from experience that a roller full of fresh paint or epoxy is more or less effective, but the timing is less than ideal. A stiff brush and high pressure air shows promise, but is far from 100%.

    I appreciate good Ideas, from inside or outside of that box.
    JE

  21. #21

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Some things that have worked for me.

    Building that that dolly to first transport the boat from that shed to the shop, where it serves as a very portable work station. Although access to the inside is not ideal, with a bit of contortion, it is accessible.

    Paint removal using hot air and a variety of scrapers. I am lucky enough to have a Leister handwelder, a powerful and adjustable heat gun that will light the fire in the woodstove if needed. My cheap heat gun did work, but very slowly.

    I settled on sharp scrapers to smooth the plywood. Efforts at sanding, thus far, have made things worse, very quickly resulting in that topo map effect, or worse. The scraper will fix this, but it takes some elbow grease, and multiple sharpenings. A flexible 6" drywall taping tool is reasonably effective, but may be improved upon?

    Fuller taper bit, countersink, and stop. Kudo's here to Jamestown for having the chart specifying the correct sizes for softwood as well as hardwood, and having the individual pieces in stock.
    JE

  22. #22

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Milestone, 1.30 AM, just finished removing the last of 46 rusted in, 1/4" carriage bolts. Expletive deleted......JE
    Last edited by Joe Evens; 01-20-2015 at 05:13 AM.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    The plywood connection; The rest of that story.
    A couple of days ago, I was at the bank, and parked next to a true Tillamook icon. Ernie was driving the same old blue Ford flatbed that he had 30+ years ago, the only time I had met him. Somewhat surprised that he recognized me, I walked over for a chat, and learned that he had been a lifelong friend of Fritz Wyss, the primary designer of the TEXAN dories, and remembered him as an exceptionally capable and innovative .man who could build "anything."

    Ernie also worked in the local plywood mills until he retired about 30 years ago.

    Turns out that he worked for years in the scarfing room at the Diamond mill, where they built custom plywood panels full time, shipping trainloads across the country to the boat manufacturers thru the 50's and early 60's.

    Seems that you could get about any length of high quality plywood scarfed, up to 40 feet, the length of the room, (The only warm room in the mill, and a much coveted job.)

    Ernie was particularly proud of their high end, 1/4 inch, 5 ply panel. Each face had to be A+, one piece of veneer, with zero plugs or repairs. No voids inside, with any joints fully butted and glued.

    Makes a person question whether any real progress has been made. Has it been worth the losses?

    Anyway, contrary to my earlier information, it seems almost certain that the 20 ft plywood for the TEXAN series was indeed obtained locally.

    Btw, Ernie recently turned 90, is sharp and quick mentally and physically, drives as well as anyone else, and still drinks beer. Gives me hope.

    Our time talking was short, in the rain, and I have a strong sense of unfinished business. Download the old guard while you can, What they know may well be very useful in the near future, and is lost when they are gone.
    JE

  24. #24

    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II



    Pushing ever closer to paint. Bottom is done, Fiberglass thru epoxy graphite coating.

    Sides are glassed and sanded thru 150 grit. The 80 feet of filets sealing the 58 year old glue joints at the exterior chine log and sheer plank are finished pending minor touchup/rework.

    The 1" x 8 1/2" sheer plank is sealed, nail dimples, bolt holes, dents and dings are filled, sanded and ready to re drill and install the new 316 SS sheer clamp bolts.

    Getting close to paint, but still a few days out.

    When the prep is finished, the tent comes down, the totally trashed shop gets cleaned and reclaimed from the dust monster, a new tent goes up with the plastic on the inside of the same basic frame, for dust control, and finally, when I run out of reasons not to paint, it commences.

    Just the base paint, the stripes can wait until after the boat is flipped, and the not to be underestimated interior job is done.

    This is a big project, but for a first timer like myself, the education that comes with it is both priceless, and free.
    JE

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    Joe
    Great post. Anymore on this project? I've been looking a various designs and building scale models trying to get the shape right. Please post somemore.
    Thanks
    Jim

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    I'm home mending from shoulder replacement surgery and dug up this thread to read again. I'm wondering if a new dory was built off of this ones measurements would eliminating the motor well and hanging the motor off the transom change the boats handling? could she be built that way if no beach launches were to occur? I've noticed Terry Learned's are transom hung.

    Any pictures of her completed?
    thanks Jim

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Project,..Restoration of a 1958 Pacific Power Dory, The TEXAN II

    bump

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