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Thread: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    Tad
    I have a serious question for you. I have been under the impression for many years, that flat bottom boats made very poor blue water sailors, that their flat bottom gave them a rough ride in over waves and chop. That they sort of bashed about, where as the deeper Vee shaped keels sliced through the waves and chop, making a much smoother way. Also that flat bottom boats had a real tendency to slide sideways like a catamaran. Are these characteristic true, or is this another example of the many myths, and generalizations that become cold hard facts in the waterfront bars? Is this another example of compromising blue water characteristic for shallow water access? Capt. Zatarra
    In general you are right, a deeper and finer lined hull will have a slower and more comfortable motion than a boxier sectioned hull which will have a quicker motion. But there are dozens of varables and it's a question of degree. Every cargo ship today has a flat bottom and vertical sides, because that shape provides the most cargo volume. In the case of the 56' schooner above we ended up with a deeper shape to get the inside ballast down low, with a higher bilge turn so underwater volume is not huge. We were looking for speed and stability, while interior volume is moderate and the hull is pretty, not clunky looking.
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  2. #72
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Captn if you are trading gems or essential oils rather than bulky cargo, pretty much any old yacht with a bit of storage will do won't it? It's when you start hauling tree trunks, or maybe bales of Thai silk that a bit more space might be required. But as you suggest, there might not be so much profit in those bulky goods.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    Peter you crack me up sometimes, let's see 20pax times $3 equals $60 minus what ever you pay your three of four deckhands. It does sound like fun, I'll give you that. But I think it's like farming. My older brother is a farmer, and he likes to say "FARMING IT IS SOMETHING TO DO WHILE YOU SLOWLY GO BROKE" Z.
    Yep, I've been a farmer too .... but it's only 20 miles to the next island and living costs up there are very low. If you want to make money become a lawyer ! The crew would be on $40 pw.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  4. #74
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    It's just such a tribal and dangerous place. We know, well friends of friends, the woman who ran the black cat trail treck. She did everything right, by the book if there was a book. Employed locals, looked after locals,all the way along the trek, it was all great. Until someone got stroppy and decided to hack her team to death. You might have seen it on the news.
    I did, I'm trading with EnZed .
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  5. #75
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Z, re the cruising crowd being a hard lot to take money from, I hear what you are saying but I have seen it working well for some and two different yachts in particular spring to mind.

    The first couple I met in Ambon and I bumped into again a few times up the track throughout Malaysia and Thailand, an Australian couple. He sold himself out as a refrigeration mechanic and seemed to be continuously busy with repairing refrigeration on cruising yachts and air conditioning systems on larger yachts. He was on a 40' yacht so didn't have much space for gear but didn't really need to carry much more than his gauges, gas and a compressor but he did rely on the income to keep cruising. It was one of those trades that no one really understood themselves or had the gear to deal with and which they didn't trust local trades to deal with, so he always appeared to be busier than a one armed man in a boxing ring. He didn't need to park himself in a marina to do the work but he said that quite often it paid to do so as he'd end up taking on work for the marina as well, or be referred by the marina. I've often thought that if I were to head off cruising again, that'd be the trade that I'd bone up on first and invest in the gear and gas to operate.

    The other couple I first met in Malaysia, (though I found they'd been sailing close by me since Australia) then again in Thailand and later in Cypress and then Israel, an American couple and both of them sewed canvas and upholstery and he also sold himself out as an electrician. They did wonderful work so I assume they'd done that as a business in the US, they seemed to have work waiting for them when they arrived, repairing and making sail covers, dodgers, dinghy covers, outboard covers and so on. They had a good workshop set in their 46' yacht but did most of their work on the deck under an awning. They didn't seem to really need the work to survive but I gather it paid for them to stay in marina's and do some land touring in relative comfort, which I gather they did quite a bit of.
    Last edited by Larks; 08-17-2014 at 09:01 PM.
    Larks

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  6. #76
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I've always thought the idea income earning tool, for me at least would be a small (36" bed ) metal lathe. Decent metal work can be hard to come by.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  7. #77
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    I've always thought the idea income earning tool, for me at least would be a small (36" bed ) metal lathe. Decent metal work can be hard to come by.
    It’d be a great thing to have and to set up Peter, knowing just how useful they can be and what you can achieve with one. But unfortunately I think it’d be a difficult one to make much money from one to cover cruising costs, especially amongst the cruising community, so you’d need to chase commercial and luxury vessels. Having worked in the industry, machining is probably the hardest area to get customers to understand the time and work involved to justify the price of the work and they expect something like turning a thread for a CuNi bar to be the same price as an off the shelf bolt. It probably falls into the same bucket as what Z was saying with hanging the timber googaw bracket.
    Whereas something like a sail cover has some volume to it and the client can see something tangible for their money.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
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    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  8. #78
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    True , I met a bloke once with a nice little metal working set up on his 40 footer but he wasn't rolling in work.

    Sailmaking would be much better but a cat with a huge deck would be the go!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  9. #79
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I think a good little metal workshop would actually be very useful though and could indeed keep you busy, if you had the right gear and the capacity to be reasonably versatile, but you’d need the space and you’d need the power.

    If you could set up enough gear to be able to weld aluminium and stainless, bend tube of different diameters and blend and polish SS welds and had the space to carry some basic materials (SS tube, elbows, discs for ends etc, ally and SS flat bar, some bits of ally plate and so on), I think you could keep yourself quite well employed.

    Add rigging to the mix if you had the space and capacity to carry some differing sized cable rolls and swaging gear......

    It wouldn't keep you busy in Australia because there are so many workshops available and people wouldn't trust their job to a yachtie, but when you're cruising you'd be very popular - cruising yachties generally have little faith in local trades when they can't speak the language or have been burnt time and time again when the local trade will just say adios never to see you again.

    As a cruising yacht they are likely to be going the same way as you and may see you again and word gets around quickly amongst the sailing fraternity if you are worth while or if you are dodgy and best avoided.
    Last edited by Larks; 08-17-2014 at 10:44 PM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    There are some very nice little TIG units around now for surprisingly little money and a small diesel or a good battery bank and a big inverter would do for power . It probably be worth stripping them prior to taking them aboard to try to slow if not stop corrosion and then store them very carefully aboard .But they are light and small even with the gas tank. (Gas supply could be a problem after a while with different local filling setups).
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  11. #81
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Captn if you are trading gems or essential oils rather than bulky cargo, pretty much any old yacht with a bit of storage will do won't it? It's when you start hauling tree trunks, or maybe bales of Thai silk that a bit more space might be required. But as you suggest, there might not be so much profit in those bulky goods.
    I think that I don't know what I will find in all the ports of the world so I want some room in case I need it. Z.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Yep, I've been a farmer too .... but it's only 20 miles to the next island and living costs up there are very low. If you want to make money become a lawyer ! The crew would be on $40 pw.
    A lawyer, A LAWYER!! Did I kick your dog? Why would you say some thing so cruel, and mean, I thought we were friends? Z.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I know two very pleasant lawyers so I'm not going to say anything .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  14. #84
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Today while out and about I stopped in at the recycle center and ask what the 'buy price' was for iron, are you seating down? my price for iron for ballast is....20 cents a pound, that makes the $20,000 dollars for ballast only $5,000. That is awesome. Capt. Zatarra

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    A lawyer, A LAWYER!! Did I kick your dog? Why would you say some thing so cruel, and mean, I thought we were friends? Z.
    I used to work as a lawyer, but I gave it up.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I used to work as a lawyer, but I gave it up.
    Good for you Phil, I commend you.

    In my fevered brain this statement reads...."I used to abuse power and live the life of a white collar criminal, but I gave it up."

    The amount of damage, disruption, and loss, to my life that has been caused by lawyers both directly and indirectly has been astronomical! To the point now that where lawyers are concerned I cannot think objectively. I have been told that there are decent humanitarian lawyers out there, but I have never met one. Sure they are charming and very pleasant when you meet them, in fact they are still charming and and all kinds of pleasant small talk while they tear your world apart and empty out your life savings.

    Well this is getting way off topic. So let me try and get us back on track. In all my years of sailing, I have never seen what I would view as a satisfactory way of handling the anchors on a sail boat. Here's what I mean. To be a good cruising sailboat, it will need a variety of different anchors for different sea floor conditions, (if someone has come up with an anchor that will hold securely in mud, sand, kelp, coral, rock, etc. Please share it with me). As well as kedging anchors and a lunch hook anchor. The problem is, no sailboat that I have seen has come up with an adequate way to store these anchors such that they are secure, really available, and not in the way. I will qualify my remarks at this time, to say that the metal brackets that bolt to the deck for the purpose securing the anchor by pin or clips, fail as a viable solution because they are a real hazard to working the foredeck in bad weather. Bow rollers with the retaining gear to secure the anchor are great I had two before, one with a CQR and one with a Bruce. The problem came when I wanted to deploy my Fisherman or my Danforth. The anchor had to be feed out several feet then hooked with a boat hook and brought on board, for switching to the new anchor. My Danforth was stored in the sail locker so it was always had to be dug from under several bags of sails. My fisherman Is an extra challenge because it is not the collapsable Herreshoff type but the 3D puzzle shapped kind that so many people have tattooed on them self. For a while it was tied to the gunnel, then tied to the inboard portian of the bowsprit, and then tied to the Samson post. It was a constant search to find the right place to store it. We had quite a discussion in my schooner build thread about the weight of the anchor chain being up high in the bow section, and figured out a way to move all the weight from the anchor chain to a locker back at the base of the foremast. This improvement will be in the new build. Now if you could help me figure out a system where by six different anchor could be stored safely and securely, and be easily deployed, that would be awesome. So if you were designing this schooner what anchors would you carry, and how would secure them. A locker in the bow with built in racks, festooned all about the bowsprit and fore deck. I think that if someone could come up with the perfect answer, that would be worth a free passage on the new schooner when she gets launched.

    Here is a couple of anchor tales to help set the stage for what must be over come beside the obvious that has been stated. Many years ago I flew down to Panama to pick up a 42' ketch and deliver it north, while sailing past Costa Rica we were in a lot of jarring chop, when we arrived at our intended anchorage, we realized that we had no anchor and no anchor chain! Somewhere in route the constant pounding of the anchor in the bow roller had sheared off the anchor retention pin, at that point the anchor selfdeployed in several thousand feet of water. Upon inspection of the anchor locker we could see that when the chain reached the bitter end it was moving so fast that it snapped the inch and a quarter line that was securing the bitter end to the base of the Samson post like it was nothing at all.

    The second account was while sailing off the coast of Oregon we hit the storm of the century. I had gotten tired of having to dig the Danforth out from under the sails every time I wanted to use it. So I tied it to the shrouds with two different types of rope, one was a 1 inch three strand anchor rode. And the other was braided 5/8 halyard. And the eye of the anchor was tied off with 1 inch flat braid, it was a spare left over from the Jackline I had installed for the trip, really strong stuff. Despite all the effort to secure the anchor, after the storm, the anchor was GEE OH IN EE gone.

    So what say ye mates. Capt. Z.

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    You were rather lucky that the run out chain didn't implode the stem, that could have been a nasty surprise !
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I bring mine in for any long upwind sail or offshore passage.
    Sometimes I carry 5 on deck.

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    You were rather lucky that the run out chain didn't implode the stem, that could have been a nasty surprise !
    We thought that that too. At first we were discussing how to secure the bitter end so it could not happen again, and then realized that the weight of the anchor plus two hundred feet of 3/8 BBB, times the speed of it free fall would be a distructive force to be reckoned with. Since then I have always had a snap link on a rope tied to the Samson post that I would snap on to the chain behind the anchor once it was housed. A belt and suspenders kind of thing. Z.

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I bring mine in for any long upwind sail or offshore passage.
    Sometimes I carry 5 on deck.
    How are you securing them? Z.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    We thought that that too. At first we were discussing how to secure the bitter end so it could not happen again, and then realized that the weight of the anchor plus two hundred feet of 3/8 BBB, times the speed of it free fall would be a distructive force to be reckoned with. Since then I have always had a snap link on a rope tied to the Samson post that I would snap on to the chain behind the anchor once it was housed. A belt and suspenders kind of thing. Z.
    Maybe 100 feet of 1'' nylon , something that can stretch to double it's length and recover and still have a chance of slowing the load slowly , rather than instantly ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    How are you securing them? Z.
    my biggest , 100 lb fisherman , gets lowered into the focsle and frapped to the bulkhead.
    My 66lb bruce is frapped to a bulkhead at the mast .
    others , 45cqr, fortress,just lay on the chain in the focsle.
    i too , have had anchors get into trouble on long violent bashes.
    putting them below is a pita, but is also makes it safer on the sails and the flesh when moving around up there.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    So there is no solutions out there for 'convenient' anchor storage. Their big, heavy, and ackward, and must be delt with, that is until they develop the "Global Positioning Graviton Water Hook". This is where the nano robots in my bottom paint that normally clean off barnacle and slim from the bottom of my boat by converting them to electrical energy and storing that energy in my batteries, will attach them selves in to a chain and affix themselves to the ocean floor and thus hold my schooner in place. While we are waiting on M.I.T. to develop the "All In One Nanobots For Sailing" I think I will have two catheads, port and starb'd, for the fisherman, with brackets to secure them to the gunnel just past the catheads. And two rollers out as far as possible on the bow and will create anchor brackets that will secure the anchors on the inside of the gunnels. The kedging anchors will still have to live in the V berth. And the stern anchor will have it's own deck box where else but in the stern! This time around I will definitely have a windless at the stern and a roller on the cap rail for anchor recovery. I'm still got this idea rattling around in my head that there must be some kind of sheath, like a belt knife sheath, that the anchor could be dropped into, that could hold it securely. Or something like a pelican box that would be flush mounted to the deck so that the deck is still flat and unobstructed, but could be opened and the anchor put in it's spot, and then closed up. This would take up head room down below, but the big question in my mind could it be made watertight. Z.

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Catheads have always seemed like a good way to do it if the boat is big enough to handle them. They do tend to leave the anchors a bit exposed if you are putting your head down into a bad sea. But for moving anchorage to anchorage they seem very convenient.

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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Capt.Z. I am afraid you are about 60 years out of date. I like your idea but after living and working in shipping throughout the pacific islands, although considered third world countries, the noble savages were all educated by the likes of us. Graft and corruption rule supreme, and don't come anywhere near Australia. C&BP are among the worst in the world. I have a very good friend who lives in Honiara, Solomon Islands, He is a marine shell dealer, dredger, even with all the required licenses from most countries he still gets screwed.I had another aquaintence who built a beautiful 60ft. schooner, full hydraulic systems, in mast furlers, anchor winches, warping drums for all lines so on and so forth. In the saloon was a full size organ and when his wife thought the visitors should go she cranked it up and gave endless hymnals.But anyway, Brian had built an amazing measuring machine, about the size of a large commercial microwave oven and out of this he produced miniature bottles of essence, that's the alcohol that you buy at homebrew shops and the mini things the airlines used to slug you for. You can rest assured he was licensed and registered and all the paperwork was correct.( Mus'nt diddle the revenue man) You seem to know your way around timber, have you thought about a small portable sawmill?? in New Guinea they are called "wokabout saw" go into the bush and cut select timber, carry out the planks, give either product or money to the helpers, some are built with chainsaws, others with bandsaws. Regards ray

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I think a few people still do some cargo trading in this hemisphere. This is a Denis Ganley design, shoal draft trading schooner (gets up river etc), and sheet built as well. Simple and elegant, and as with his other hard chine designs, pretty good looking too.
    If interested I think John Welsford would likely be able to help with how to source the original plans if you wrote to him.


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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Ganley plans available here....

    http://www.ganleyyachts.co.nz/steel_boats.html
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    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Ray
    Yea the trueth is I'm probably 160 years to late. But I have never been one to let every one elses fantasy spoil my reality.

    Sayla and Tad
    Thanks for heads up on Ganly plans
    I looked at his designs, and his style is just not for me, too modern looking.

    Everyone
    I have been doing a lot of thinking about this project and trying to figure out every thing that I want in this schooner. I found that when I was buying my last boat, it was so much easier because I just had to choose the one that had the most things on my list. Now I'm trying to make sure that every thing that is on my list is in this boat. So my list started out to be about concrete items like pilot house, bowsprit, and topsails, but then while I was looking at Tad's 56' cargo schooner drawing I realized that some of the things that need to be on my list are a little more abscure. So I decided to dig a little deeper and see what else should be on my list and I realized that the most important thing this new and improved list would have to be that this schooner need to have the smoothest, the most gentlest seaway possible. You see my wive gets seasick, we are not talking about woozy discomfort, look at the horizon, kind of seasick, we talking about knee deep gut wrenching fish chummin' long after there is nothin' left to feed the swimmers, kind of, don't open your eyes or it'll start all over again, sea sickness. Yet this lady keeps sailing with me. She can handle the blue sky picture perfect sailing but when the chop is coming from one way and the wave are coming from another and the ship is rolling around like a wobbling top about to stop, she is down for the count. So as I understand it, the heavy displacement, round bottomed boats with long deep keels have the sweetest seaway possible. So in order to keep the best sailing partner ever on her feet and not on her knees fillin' chum buckets, we will sacrifice shoal draft, flat bottom, light displacement, go fast race boat for smooth seaworthyness. So that got me to thinking I had not ask my wife what her list would include so I ask her!

    My wife's list
    1.comfortable place to sit inside, for lounging and reading at anchor
    2.pilot house with kitchenette
    3.head closer to the aft cabin(in our last boat the head was all the way forward)
    4.lots of storage in galley(or a pantry off the galley)
    5.full size oven(no need for a gimbaled stove)
    6.her own nav station type desk for sewing etc.
    7.powerful motor(she views it as her security measure to get out of the way of container ships that suddenly come up on you when the winds not blowing. And off lee shores when the wind is blowing. And then there is the one time we used it to run from a huge water spout in Mexico thar we changed point of sail three times and the damn thing changed it's direction too, maybe she's right.)

    My list (a lot longer)
    1.smooth seaworthiness
    2.this schooner needs to look like it came from the last century, I just cannot buy into the slanted window cabin top that looks like someone chainsawed it off a 1970 corvette. Nor will I buy into the theory that a sailboat designed to beat the racing rules makes a good cruiser. Or maybe I just think an old style Baltimore Clipper type of gaff rigged schooner is the cats pajamas, so if I'm going to put every thing I got on one number and spin that big wheel of life, I better be putting it on something I really love.
    2.01(amendment to 2.) back in '05 we were asked to participate in the tall ship challenge, my wife and I discovered how much we enjoyed the whole thing, the crowd of nautical enthusiasts, boat parades, crew get together, captain's dinner, cannon battles, taking people out for the 3 hour cruise, especially sharing our love of our passion with so many others. So we decided that when we had make our way around the world to the med we would join the tall ship races there, and do that for as long as we're having fun. Now before every one starts telling me that it is almost impossible to make money as a school ship, yea that's probably true, and I'm not doing it to make money. I'd just like to help preserve some sailing history.
    3.it's gota be made of wood. On this forum I shouldn't have to say more.
    4.diesel electric propulsion system, I want to be able to charge the batteries while sailing. Make it air cooled so I can eliminate another through hull. And put the motor somewhere that I can work on it with out being a Chinese contortionist. And put it in a sound proof box.
    5.while were eliminating thru hulls let's go with composting toilets too.
    6.Self steering(non electric) 7,000 miles of hand steering is enough.
    7.pilot house. The 7,000 miles in #6. were outside in all kinds of weather.
    8.more canvas. Topsails, squares, gollywoblers, fisherman, I gotta be able to spread enough sails to make this schooner schoon in light air. What is the point of a sailboat that cannot sail in winds under 4 knots. And if your in 8 knots of wind and not doing 6 knots then maybe it's time to put up the moonraker.
    9.a flush deck, get rid of those dog houses and raised cabins, give me some place to put the shore boat and the life raft and still have room to move safely around the deck when your surfing off thirty foot waves, and trying to reduce sail. That job is hard enough with out having to climb around an obstacle course.
    10. It is 3:24 in the morning I really need to get some sleep, so I'll pick this up with #10 tomorrow

  29. #99
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Denison View Post
    That's it, thanks.
    I also think you should talk to George. E-Mail him and you will get an answer within 24 hours. He does not like to participate in Forums like this. But he's a nice guy and his Designs fit your Bill.

    Christian
    Last edited by koederfischgriller; 08-30-2014 at 06:29 AM.

  30. #100
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by jak3b View Post
    I like this cargo schooner by Buehler: http://www.georgebuehler.com/Melquiades%2050.html .I have read there is a need for carrying needed supplies such as books, medicine, food,and building materials to some the more remote atolls in the Pacific.I dont think it pays much or if anything but it would be a good excuse to make the voyage;-).
    Sorry, i wanted to quote THIS post!

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    911

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I would want a pilot house if I were going anywhere north or south.
    So nice not to have to put on waterproofs when it's raining or howling f9.
    The pilot house would still be above deck level with a solid hatch to below.
    Make sure the hull is deep enough to stand up in.
    james

    The hold can have a door to the rest of accommodation and a sofa could fold own whilst empty or in port.

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cape Fear, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,782

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    AirCooled Engine: Consider that with a water cooled block & a heat exchanger . . . . (1) one can eliminate the darn saltwater pump and thru hull and (2) keep a water jacketed block that gives you the option of gently pumping warm water from a diesel heater's 'water heater coil' thru the block with a solar powered hot water circ pump which yields a 1000lbs of warm cast iron inside the boat which is one of the best things in the world to help warm up a chilly cabin. Nothing like snuggling up to 1000lbs of warm cast iron on a cool/cold night.
    .
    .
    Then there is the dry exhaust blessing and curse conundrum, and I am wrestling with that now. Will let you know what I work out.
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    16,027

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    I'd scratch the electric bit out of the propulsion system. Cost and complexity for very marginal, if any, benefit. You want a simple, reliable power source. That's a diesel with a shaft and a prop. Put a rope cutter on the shaft.

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    2,171

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Your #4 in Post 98 - the diesel-electric air-cooled propulsion system in a soundproof box - sounds like quite the challenge to set up.

    Tom

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Nicaragua, until the next schooner comes along
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: Is a Cargo Schooner right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesh View Post
    I would want a pilot house if I were going anywhere north or south.
    So nice not to have to put on waterproofs when it's raining or howling f9.
    The pilot house would still be above deck level with a solid hatch to below.
    Make sure the hull is deep enough to stand up in.
    james

    The hold can have a door to the rest of accommodation and a sofa could fold own whilst empty or in port.
    James
    Totally agree that a pilothouse is essential for long distance travel, hot or cold. I would just add that my experience has been that when sailing in the cold, hot drinks and hot food, and lots of dry layers, sailing is still....dare I say... still fun, but when the tropical sun is cooking your head and it is sweltering and you cannot leave the helm, no amount of cold drinks or stripping down till your pink parts sunburn, or pouring 5gallon buckets of sea water over your head, will give you any relief, the only thing that works is getting out of the sun.

    When you said "Make sure the hull is deep enough to stand up in." are you referring to the cargo hold or the space under the pilot house, which is usually the engine room? I'm a little confused.

    Good idea about a lounging area when the cargo hold is empty. Now add a 60inch 3D flat screen and some 6.2 Dolby surround sound speakers and we may never leave the anchorage. Of course we'll need to put in a popcorn machine and some drinks on tap, and then maybe some bark-o-loungers, and then air conditioning......stop stop look at what your doing, James, I think you might be a bad influence on me because all I had thought of doing in the hold when it is empty, was putting in some pipe berths for when I take some teenagers sailing in the tall ship challenge.
    Z.

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