Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst ... 234 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 105 of 189

Thread: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike DeHart View Post
    Do you have any idea what the old fairing compound would be?
    That's a good question, Mike, and I was hoping someone here could shed some light on the subject. As you sat, the stuff was applied in a thick layer to the main casting, a sixteenth inch in most places. I'm not sure if it was the finish coating or whether there was paint applied over. There are spots where it had cracked and lifted allowing the casting to rust underneath. In some places it had been remover prior to the last painting.

    I'm guessing that there was a lot of lead in the mixture, white lead, perhaps, maybe lampblack for color, like I said, guessing.

    I'll be interested to see if the smaller castings have the same treatment, but I think maybe not. It's a lot easier to turn out perfect small castings than the large frame. With some rudimentary knowledge of the casting process it's remarkable to see these large pieces cast successfully on a regular basis, with their complex shape, thin sections and coring

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    15,823

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    So the tire tube isn't inflated, then? It's just an easily obtainable enormous o-ring?
    The tube behaves like what is known as a labyrinth seal, Figgy - lots of surface area near the floor. The goal is simply to control the rate at which the air leaks out from beneath the plate.

    Think : Hovercraft.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  3. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,963

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    That's a good question, Mike, and I was hoping someone here could shed some light on the subject. As you sat, the stuff was applied in a thick layer to the main casting, a sixteenth inch in most places. I'm not sure if it was the finish coating or whether there was paint applied over. There are spots where it had cracked and lifted allowing the casting to rust underneath. In some places it had been remover prior to the last painting.

    I'm guessing that there was a lot of lead in the mixture, white lead, perhaps, maybe lampblack for color, like I said, guessing.

    I'll be interested to see if the smaller castings have the same treatment, but I think maybe not. It's a lot easier to turn out perfect small castings than the large frame. With some rudimentary knowledge of the casting process it's remarkable to see these large pieces cast successfully on a regular basis, with their complex shape, thin sections and coring
    I've watched large iron castings being poured Jim and it's an intimidating process, the temperatures involved are enough to fuse the core materials ! I still haven't poured iron although i keep thinking about it.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Headwaters, Alloways Creek (NJ, USA)
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    The fairing compound on my South Bend lathe was not the finish coat. It was a very dark gray where the finish paint was a light gray originally. I found places out of sight where the fairing had runs and sags, leading me to believe it was brushed on as a thick liquid or thin paste. It couldn't be just a thick layer of paint. That would take ages to build up that thick and it would shrink as it dried. It would also build more evenly. The fairing stuff I saw was thick in the low spots and thin on the high spots. Again, something with a self-leveling trait. Somebody applied it at the factory so somebody knows what it is and how it is used. I need to find one of those sombodies. I heard somewhere that Bridgeport mills were faired with plaster but I could never confirm that.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    22,300

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I suspect the old putty filler used on machinery is Nitro-Stan...

    A nitrocelluose laquer product it has been around since the Model T Ford. Comes on a tube or can, available in grey, white or red it works very well for thin applications like - 1/16th inch. It takes overnight to dry and sands off very easily.


  6. #76
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I was wondering about using Nitrostan for filler. After stripping the paint I'm going to pickle the metal with a phosphate wash, then apply the white Rustoleum primer. At this point casting defects would be more apparent. Some Nitrostan squeegeed on would be a good way to fill.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Headwaters, Alloways Creek (NJ, USA)
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I have used NitroStan and similar lacquer putties on antique car restorations. It works well as a sandscratch filler and surfacer in thin applications. However, I suspect that it would not be well suited to thick filling like on a large casting. It does shrink as it dries. It will also swell a little when paint is applied over it. If you are going that route, I would recommend using a lightweight polyester body filler instead. (There are better fillers than "Bondo.") It squeegees on like the lacquer putty but does not shrink or swell during curing and painting. You will have to sand it out smooth before painting, but that is not difficult. In auto body work, NitroStan and its relatives have been made mostly obsolete by two part polyester surfacing putty. It is like body filler but thinner and creamier. It does not swell when painted. For that matter, lacquer primer has even given way to two part epoxy primers now.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    The saw has been disassembled for the most part. There are a few pieces still fastened together, but not many.

    This is the gear for the table tilt mechanism. It's driven by a worm gear attached to the handwheel. This, and other parts small enough, have been soaked in a bucket of lacquer thinner for a few days. They emerge covered with the powdery remains of whatever was previously coating them. A wire-brushing is all that's needed to get them ready for paint.




  9. #79
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    92,193

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Looks a bit like a certain quadrant gear. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Looks a bit like a certain quadrant gear. . .
    I wrote a paper on quadrant gears last semester... and this looks nothing like one. These days, though, all gears shine with new light to me.
    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 08-05-2014 at 02:38 PM.

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    The painting starts with a coat of primer, well daubed into the rough cast iron. There'll be two coats of primer, it being impossible to get everything on the first coat because of the texture of the iron. The first coat has been put on kind of dry, the second will be wetter. There's no taping off of the machined areas. I'm trying these rubber blocks embedded with silicon carbide to rub the machined surfaces. They work quite well, and will remove the overbrushing with no trouble.

    This is a nice casting, very thin and light. It's the cover for the gear in the background


  12. #82
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    43,212

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Could you mask the machined faces with a resist? Brushing on melted bees wax perhaps?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    92,193

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I wrote a paper on quadrant gears last semester... and this looks nothing like one. These days, though, all gears shine with new light to me.
    it looks like a row of kitkats wrapped around a wheel; instead of arranged in an arc. . .
    Last edited by Paul Pless; 08-05-2014 at 03:44 PM.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  14. #84
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Too far inland.
    Posts
    9,199

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Twinkies, not kit-kat?
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  15. #85
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    92,193

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    It's been a long day
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  16. #86
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Could you mask the machined faces with a resist? Brushing on melted bees wax perhaps?

    I suppose, Nick, that something like that would work, in fact, I'm sure there must be products just for that sort of thing. But it's a whole other step...and then there's the cleaning-up. This way I can be a little sloppy and get some paint on the thing the same day, coz I like to paint as soon after the wire brushing as possible.


    Here, a little scrub and the paint's gone...and the iron's starting to have a nice glow.


  17. #87
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    it looks like a row of kitkats wrapped around a wheel; instead of arranged in an arc. . .
    Here ya go, Paul...


  18. #88
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Headwaters, Alloways Creek (NJ, USA)
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    When I paint machinery, I just go ahead and brush up to and onto the machined surfaces without concern for a little sloppiness. Oil paints, like Rustoleum and XO-Rust, don't dry hard very quickly. They stay pliable for several days after coating. This makes the cleanup easy. After the final color coat has dried for a day or two, I use a razor blade to cut the overage off of the machined surfaces. It usually leaves the machined surface clean, but sometimes I have to follow up with a piece of scotchbrite or some sandpaper on a backing board. I have even found that a thicker layer cuts off easier than a thinner layer, so I am not shy about getting a bit sloppy at the edges. No need for the added steps of masking or precoating.

  19. #89
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here's a thread about the restoration of a Moak 32" bandsaw. It runs over thirty pages and I haven't read the whole thing yet but it's pretty comprehensive. The link opens to where he's making a rolling mobile base...

    http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=...581b4&start=45



    This is the auxiliary table sporting the second coat of primer...


  20. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,963

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Jim, could you show us a photo of the table tilt mechanism loosely assembled at some stage ? My 26" bandsaw doesn't have anything worth mentioning and I’d like to do a retro fit something accurate.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  21. #91
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Jim, could you show us a photo of the table tilt mechanism loosely assembled at some stage ? My 26" bandsaw doesn't have anything worth mentioning and I’d like to do a retro fit something accurate.
    This is the basic arrangement, Peter, with a handwheel on the worm gear shaft. There is a lug cast on the underside of the table and the arm is pinned to that. I suppose if you could scrounge up a suitable worm and gear the rest would be doable.


  22. #92
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,963

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I have one in the workshop for the swivel mechanism for a ute crane I was going to build ... but I bought a Chinese hydraulic one instead and it's great ! but ... the wheel on my little worm and wheel set up is a lot smaller than that only about 5", perhaps I could bolt an arm out and run the pivot point off that ? I'll look at it .

    Thanks Jim, much appreciated .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  23. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I'm happy to see that Mr. Noyes has regained his posting privileges. Maybe I can coax a comment or two.

    So far the process has been one of dis assembly and paint removal. Multiple coats of citrus paint remover and much wire brushing does the trick.

    Here is the main table ready for primer. The paint removing implements are seen in the background. I can recommend the wire wheel and cup brush that attaches to the angle grinder, a most aggressive combination, indeed.



  24. #94
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Last week I managed to get a coat of primer on the main body of the saw, after removing the old finish with implements various. I don't know if I mentioned, but the cylindrical protuberance is the original motor case, the patented Oliver "Motor on Shaft". It was a three phase, 900 RPM direct drive, made by GE, with a 1915 patent date.


  25. #95
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here's a peek at the reassembly of the saw. Up till now it has been a slog, removing paint down to bare metal and then applying fresh paint, two coats of primer followed by three finish. with the paint work winding down some of the reassembly can begin. As an example, here is the table tilt mechanism loosely assembled...




  26. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    92,193

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    museum quality restorations by james ledger. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  27. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    6,115

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Beautiful saw!

    I remember moving my Champion forging hammer into the shop (1905 vintage). I will not be able to move it again. When it's time , I'll "gift" it to a worthy soul with more energy than me. Many years from now by the way!
    PaulF

  28. #98
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    293

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Tracey grew up watching the Waltons and apparently it made a great impression on her. I've never watched the show, so your comment mystifies me.
    The family business was a sawmill.


  29. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    museum quality restorations by james ledger. . .
    Mostly a paint job and some new gaskets.

    I am replacing the driven sheave with a larger one which will have the effect of slowing the blade speed down considerable...and make for easier start-ups. The shaft will be cut (forgive me, Doug) to bring the new sheave as close to the machine as possible.


  30. #100
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I've been kicking around some ideas for a rolling base for the saw, one that incorporates a platform for the motor.

    To this end I've obtained a set of four casters, two fixed and two revolving. In addition, I've had six pieces of 3/8" steel plate cut.

    As soon as the steel was cut I had a better idea.

    Next time...


  31. #101
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    15,823

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I've been kicking around some ideas for a rolling base for the saw, one that incorporates a platform for the motor.

    To this end I've obtained a set of four casters, two fixed and two revolving. In addition, I've had six pieces of 3/8" steel plate cut.

    As soon as the steel was cut I had a better idea.

    Next time...

    Watching with interest. I've got about 800-1000 pounds of bandsaw to move around...
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  32. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoez View Post
    Watching with interest. I've got about 800-1000 pounds of bandsaw to move around...

    I've been thinking about your saw, Craig, and you could do something along the same lines. It'd probably be easier to make a rolling platform for a modern rectangular welded base. I'd be inclined to make a rectangular tray out of angle iron for your saws base to sit in, and fastening the casters to outriggers off that.

    This saw, being a casting instead of a weldment, presents the opportunity of making the rolling base in two halves. The halves are identical for simplicity sake and comprise of three pieces of 3/8" steel plate each.

    Welded together like so....



  33. #103
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here's the front rolling base mocked up. The front footprint of the saw casting will sit on the large steel plate with the two projecting bolts. The bolts are the mounting bolts to secure the saw to the base.


  34. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,237

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I like it! Just what I need for my saw.

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,379

    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    I like it! Just what I need for my saw.


    It's a good welding project, Ned, sturdy, simple and easily adaptable to those machines that don't take readily to off-the-shelf mobile bases.

    After looking at the results in the previous photo I thought that it would be better to give the base a wider stance. The solution, this far into the game, is to weld on some extensions to the base. These will allow the casters to be moved outboard a couple of inches. Here are the pieces being fitted and tacked. The casters bolt holes have been filled in...


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •