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Thread: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    Whoa, heavy and then some!! I'm waiting to see some check at the top to stop it from falling over with momentum when gravity takes over.

    And finally...down.

    Thad, the check line is right where you expected it. Once the saw goes past the balance point you need a way to control the last little bit of descent


  2. #37
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Low View Post
    Nicely done Jim.

    There is a certain satisfaction moving that kind of mass around single handed. So watcha gonna have to get rid of now that you scored that little number?

    Alex
    Hi, Alex,


    Here's the 20" Powermatic, 1960's vintage, that I've been using. I'm thinking of using it as a dedicated metal cutting saw because it has a two speed transmission and a variable speed drive, so it can run real slow.


  3. #38
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    A metal cutting band can be very useful . That's a score in itself !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Gibbs View Post

    BTW Tracey should watch the Waltons.
    Tracey grew up watching the Waltons and apparently it made a great impression on her. I've never watched the show, so your comment mystifies me.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    ...
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

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  6. #41
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here's a picture of a similar saw, taken off the Web. There's a nicely restored Oliver lathe in the background as well as an Oliver jointer similar to one featured in another WBF thread. This guy is in the middle of a restoration and has fabricated a nice motor mount and a set of casters for the machine.


  7. #42
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here are the casters I mentioned in the previous post. This is apparently a trial fit, after which the steel was shaped up some and painted. It's a nice design in that it keeps the saw height low. The advantage of casters in a small shop goes without saying.


  8. #43
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Do you have a link Jim? Can this chap break the wheels, or get the base to touch down to prevent movement whilst in use?
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  9. #44
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Gibbs View Post
    Do you have a link Jim? Can this chap break the wheels, or get the base to touch down to prevent movement whilst in use?

    I know you can get casters with brakes, Duncan. It's certainly a valid consideration, although a couple of wedges driven under the saw will prevent movement. It's a trade-off, mobility versus the absolute solidity of a fixed machine. No casters will give you the feel of a solidly planted machine, but if you just need a few more inches to make a cut it might be worth it.

    Here's the link to the thread....

    http://www.contractortalk.com/f40/19...ration-128619/


    Here's a link to the original advertising copy for the machine...


    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/609/1329.pdf

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Thanks Jim. I really like the fact he's got swivels on all four castors. I find the ones (I have ) that only have two swivels and two fixed a right PITA. Still, it's better than not being able to move my machines.

    Anything else come with that saw?
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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Here's a picture of a similar saw, taken off the Web. There's a nicely restored Oliver lathe in the background as well as an Oliver jointer similar to one featured in another WBF thread. This guy is in the middle of a restoration and has fabricated a nice motor mount and a set of casters for the machine.


    I hope he reinforced his floor joist if that really is a wood floor system and not plywood on sleepers over concrete, that's a lot of dead load in one corner of the shop!! Man what a NICE set up! Guy must be a Doctor or Lawyer to afford those tools!! LOL most woodworkers could swing that!

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Hi, Alex,


    Here's the 20" Powermatic, 1960's vintage, that I've been using. I'm thinking of using it as a dedicated metal cutting saw because it has a two speed transmission and a variable speed drive, so it can run real slow.



    Oh look the boats done!!! Where are the launch photo's Jim??




    LOL.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Tracey grew up watching the Waltons and apparently it made a great impression on her. I've never watched the show, so your comment mystifies me.

    Me to?? I know Charles Ingail's (sp) Michael Landon's character on Little House on the Prairie did some wood working in a few story lines , but I don't remember Ralph Walton , or John Boy taking on woodworking project , at least on and scale more than a chicken coup type project.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Saw this over the weekend, thought of this thread.


    Stomp on that pedal and the caster is lower than the mount. The box looked to weigh a couple thousand pounds or so.
    They're out there.
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    That's funny because I was just looking at these...

    http://www.amazon.com/Wagner-Total-L...S59DNEB56YA902

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I'm glad to see that saw go to a place where it will get both the use and respect that it deserves.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  17. #52
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    Saw this over the weekend, thought of this thread.


    Stomp on that pedal and the caster is lower than the mount. The box looked to weigh a couple thousand pounds or so.
    They're out there.
    How is the caster retained in its down position Mike?
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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I think I might do some cosmetic work on the saw before I put it in service. The paint visible in the pictures is not the original paint. I believe it to be from spray cans as it's quite thin and shows some runs but no sign of brush marks. The original paint is underneath, a much darker gray, a very thick coating that smooths out the casting surface. There are spots where the casting has developed rust and the original paint has lifted.

    A scrape, wire brush and paint will improve the appearance of the machine and protect it until the next steward comes along.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    This is one of those things that's brilliantly simple in actual operation, but awkward to describe in words, but here goes....

    See that shiny metal plate piece behind the black painted angled bracket? The caster is mounted to that piece.

    The stomp-on-pedal piece has a cam-shaped element (hidden in this photo) which rotates about that pin/bolt upper right.

    When you stomp on the inner part of the pedal (the part with the brown paint slop) the cam pushes that shiny metal plate down, and because the cam is cam-shaped, gravity and friction hold it there until you stomp on the other side of the pedal piece.

    The box (which is something like 12' long by 4' high by 6' wide) in the photo has these stomp-down units on the front, and normal non-articulating casters at the back, which are set level with the bottom of the box, so the wheel only bears weight when the front casters are extended. Seems like the best of both worlds for a shop machine. Caster maneuverability for maneuvering time, and machine-on-floor stability for work time.

    Unfortunately I have absolutely zero idea of who made these or where to get them.
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    Unfortunately I have absolutely zero idea of who made these or where to get them.
    castorstore.com

    seriously. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Here's one I built for my rather heavy table saw.





    Lowered



    Lifted.... it uses a threaded bar to pull the saw up a gentle inclined plane . The battery drill pulls it easily.

    http://woodgears.ca/mobile_base/sibley.html
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    castorstore.com

    seriously. . .

    er

    casterstore

    Wow these look pretty slick (if pricey)
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    er

    casterstore

    Wow these look pretty slick (if pricey)


    MSC Industrial supply also carries some, but as you say, they're pricey. Once you get above a certain capacity, they get really pricey. DAMHIKT.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  24. #59
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    This is one of those things that's brilliantly simple in actual operation, but awkward to describe in words, but here goes....

    See that shiny metal plate piece behind the black painted angled bracket? The caster is mounted to that piece.

    The stomp-on-pedal piece has a cam-shaped element (hidden in this photo) which rotates about that pin/bolt upper right.

    When you stomp on the inner part of the pedal (the part with the brown paint slop) the cam pushes that shiny metal plate down, and because the cam is cam-shaped, gravity and friction hold it there until you stomp on the other side of the pedal piece.

    The box (which is something like 12' long by 4' high by 6' wide) in the photo has these stomp-down units on the front, and normal non-articulating casters at the back, which are set level with the bottom of the box, so the wheel only bears weight when the front casters are extended. Seems like the best of both worlds for a shop machine. Caster maneuverability for maneuvering time, and machine-on-floor stability for work time.

    Unfortunately I have absolutely zero idea of who made these or where to get them.
    I have a similar set up on my table saw and thicknesser, but the cam is exposed and forms part of the lever. The problem is the cam/lever combination is cast high density poly', but still likes to crumble away at the cam after a bit of use. Plus the two wheels on the other side are fixed and don't swivel. It's still more convenient than not being able to move them at all!

    What material is the cam on that one Mike?
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  25. #60
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoez View Post
    MSC Industrial supply also carries some, but as you say, they're pricey. Once you get above a certain capacity, they get really pricey. DAMHIKT.
    i just bought some for a 1200 pound xray table. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I made some air casters using small bicycle tires and 1-1/8 plywood... For My big powermatic bandsaw (about a ton) and now it can be slid around with one hand.
    Search> air casters>images




    Here's another


  27. #62
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    i just bought some for a 1200 pound xray table. . .
    I'm working on a system that's intended to lift an 1,100 pound equipment rack. We need to raise the rack high enough on the casters to lift it off a set of wire-rope shock isolators. Not an easy find, nor a cheap one.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  28. #63
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    I made some air casters using small bicycle tires and 1-1/8 plywood... For My big powermatic bandsaw (about a ton) and now it can be slid around with one hand.
    Search> air casters>images




    Here's another


    Cool! How about a build thread?

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    A pretty simple deal - imagine a small tube type bicycle tire with one side (the "up" side) stapled to the sheet of plywood. Drill the plywood and thread in an airchuck fitting, hook it up to your air compressor and voila - air caster. (It works best if you have one in each corner, to avoid tilting and leaking out the air pressure)

    It is weight calulated directly to the psi/sq.inches. A single 12" dia tire with 100 psi will lift 5 tons... and slide with one hand. It wont work well on an leaky old wood floor, but you can spread down sheets of plywood on the path where you want to move.

    You would have to get mine out from under the saw to view it, but you can look at these commercially available models and get the idea.


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    Default

    Stapled?
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    Stapled?
    Sure...


  32. #67
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    i just bought some for a 1200 pound xray table. . .
    Man, that's a heavy x ray
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    The saw is slowly shedding its component parts as the paint removal progresses. The frame is almost entirely stripped bare. I am using a citrus remover to lift the paint. The small parts go into a bucket of lacquer thinner, a covered bucket. The topcoat lifts easily but the underlying fairing compound takes a long time to soften. Once the paint is removed the frame will be washed with mineral spirits rubbed in with steel wool, than wire brushed when dry. The plan is to coat with Rustoleum primer followed by two topcoats, allowing a weeks drying between coats.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    Do you have any idea what the old fairing compound would be? I have rebuilt & repainted some old cast iron machinery. I have found the fairing to be cracking and peeling on most items. And it was pretty thick in some places. I scrabe, brush, and remove the fairing material then just paint the castings. It does not look as nice as the new machine would have. They didn't have "Bondo" in the 1920's. It looks like a slurry that was brushed from what I have observed. I figure it had to be self-leveling. I don't believe that a production plant would have someone sanding machine bases. I figure it had to be something simple. Maybe just oil paint with chalk mixed in? Or oil paint with plaster? If I could figure this out I could do better resto work.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Doug Noyes Oliver Bandsaw

    So the tire tube isn't inflated, then? It's just an easily obtainable enormous o-ring?
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

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