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Thread: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

  1. #71
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Quote Originally Posted by simmons22 View Post
    lookin sweet! I've been following you build since beginning. I was very interested in the Forum exchanges about your Hook. It seems all so straight forward, yet, when I reached that stage with my 22 footer, it all at once seemed so vague and ethereal. I fussed and messed with it, and finally decided that the boat was showing me the way it had to be so I did what the boat showed. It seems kinda swoopier (more hook) than I thot it would be, but who was I to argue? Enjoying your build, so keep on building and building well !
    Yeah, the hook was an issue for me. I'd inadvertently subdued it in setting up the transom and had to add some shims to lift the bottom a bit more there. My hook is probably less pronounced than it could have been but I'm comfortable with it and believe that trim can make up any difference. The construction of the Simmons is pretty straight forward, but the hook is definitely not well described and there is lots of room for adjustment in the layout.

    I also ran into an issue with the widths of several of the aft frames. I was aware of the problem from other builders posts but underestimated the extra widths needed. It worked out, but there is a small area of the bottom planks near the back where it's not fully fair. I'll push it out when I glue on the next planks but I could have avoided it with better faring batten work up front.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Boat removed from strong back, flipped, and set on rolling cradle.

    It's amazing how fast my projects become playhouses!




  3. #73
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    The cradle needs to be leveled a bit. The idea is to move this into the garage for the winter and move the other skiff out here.

    I have one concern. How am I going to get this onto a trailer after it's all built up, and presumably MUCH heavier than it is now? Is it a mistake to build on a rolling cradle if I don't really have way to lift the boat later? I'm guessing this could be accomplished with some large screw jacks. Just not sure exactly how to go about it.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    There are several ways to put the boat on the trailer. But using just your setup as you have it now on the cradle, with the boat on the cradle and with a bunk trailer, slide the trailer bunks under the bow, which is overhanging a fair amount now on the cradle. You can crank up the tongue of your trailer with a tongue jack if the trailer is a bit too high. You can pick the tongue up and push it back, if the trailer is still too high when you crank the stand up all the way.

    And as the boat comes up on the trailer, you will get a feel of the balance and counter balance. Even with the balance favoring off the trailer, when you get the boat up on the bunks a bit, just push the tongue down or use a concrete block or two, or get some help to push it down and then this should lift the boat transom up a bit from the cradle. Maybe get someone to gently assist the transom up until you get the tongue completely down on the ground, if its not too much weight hanging off the trailer. Then crank the boat up until you get the boat on the trailer with the proper tongue weight on it for now. Keep in mind that this will be a bit different when you install your motor. So don't go up too far for now, as this will change when you rig it.

    Now keep in mind that when you choose your trailer, the trailer should be a bit shorter than what you normally would use on a transom mounted engine. Your engine will need to have clearance at the back end of the trailer so that you can trim the engine all the way down. At least that's the preferred direction. And one more thing, you may want to custom make you a set of bunks that will extend back further on a stock trailer using the same brackets, which is what I normally do. If you need pictures, let me know.
    Happy trails to you.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Makes sense, that sounds like it should work. I'll build on the cradle to the point of having the interior all done, minus any of the running gear. Planning on a trailer for the hull length up to the end of the motor well, so the extra length will hang off as noted. Good idea to ad bunk length, yes if you have any pics esp for the 18' I'd like to see what that set up looks like, how much extra you use.

    I'll also need to have the trailer modified to include a hinged tongue, otherwise it will never fit in the garage (required by landlord).

  6. #76
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    You can build on a split cradle too. Over the next few days I will get a shot or two and send them to you. While the trailer manufacturers are locked into a short hangover from the bracket, being mindful of breaking a flat 2x6 , the standard for most smaller trailers, I have not had any problems going 24 inches without a problem to date from the last cross member and support bracket. But you will not need that much on your 18. You can buy the swing away bracket for the trailer and do it yourself, if you cannot find one on the shelf.
    Happy trails to you.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Looking good. The extra degree on the transom was a good move.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Nice! Keep the photos comin' and let us know what sort of hinge you end up using. As far as I know you always want the hinge forward of the swing-away rolling jack to allow moving the boat with the tongue folded, so that may be a tight squeeze depending on many factors.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    Nice! Keep the photos comin' and let us know what sort of hinge you end up using. As far as I know you always want the hinge forward of the swing-away rolling jack to allow moving the boat with the tongue folded, so that may be a tight squeeze depending on many factors.
    It's the Fulton trailer hinge: http://www.etrailer.com/Folding-Tong...FURgfgod1QYGwQ And you are correct, it needs to be installed after the tongue jack. I have no idea how to estimate the extra trailer length that will need to stick out past the stem, so that's the real variable for me. I have the length in my garage if I load the boat diagonally, but there are some other issues like wall mounted work tables in the way and what do with all the crap I keep in the middle of the garage! It's going to be tight if it fits at all! We'll see.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Moved hull into the garage last week, leveled the cradle yesterday. I've mostly been sanding off epoxy squeeze out on the inside (as well as dirt and water discoloration from getting wet a few times in the back yard). Filled holes in frames from strongback fasteners. Will put in a small fillet along frame to bottom joints this week then epoxy seal bilge.





    Next step before moving on to more planks is getting out the bottom patterns (just door skin scraps hot glued together for now). Before I go too far with that I need to settle an issue about how I'll build the bottom. I'm building frame less with a 5" side deck for rigidity. My plan is to build a floor that is full coverage and glued to the frames, similar to boat in WB 186, but instead of leaving it sealed, I'll add 3 12"x36" hatches along the length of the boat for access, cleaning, and airing out. I may build these, or I may look for some old teak "ski locker hatches". You can see the intended layout in the plan mockup below.

    Questions I have about this are:

    1) Should I go ahead and epoxy seal these floors down, or use something less permanent like Sika or 3m? How permanent should I build these? I'm inclined to seal the backsides up with epoxy and epoxy them down firm and permanent.

    2) The front space between frame 1 and the stem won't be under a hatch, I'm planning on sealing the limbers there and filling it with foam and sealing air tight. Any concerns with that? I'm guessing its too small a space to produce much pressure form heat expansion etc. The rear spaces to either side of the motor well are also sealed like this but wont be foam filled and will have an airtight deck hatch over each.

    3) My plans have the front of the motor mount in two 18mm pieces for thickness. The 2nd piece is glued to the 1st, after the floor is glued down and extends over the back edge of the floor. This makes sense for a permanent floor, but could be an issue if I think I'd ever need to pull the deck off. Any reason not to make a join here where the motor well face is glued don over the back of the floor?


  11. #81
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    1) Should I go ahead and epoxy seal these floors down, or use something less permanent like Sika or 3m? How permanent should I build these? I'm inclined to seal the backsides up with epoxy and epoxy them down firm and permanent.


    I would not seal the decks down in any permanent manner. Of course your layout plays a big role into whether you can pull the floors up easily down the road. So for the more permanent parts of the layout, I would personally work around making the other areas of the deck easily removable. Its just nice to get under them and clean any residue of build up stemming from dampness and the likes. Also if you store your boat inside of a garage, personally I always open up the lower decks and air them out. I don’t know what type of plywood you will be using for the decks.

    But if you end up using Occumne plywood, then the dryer you keep it the better. Meranti is not that big of a deal. I would seal the back sides of your deck pieces with multiple coats of Tile Clad Epoxy Coatings from Sheerwin Williams or Polymide Coatings from Benjamin Moore. Devoe has a simular two part 4508, or it used to be. If you buy white in either, all can tint it if you wish another color. If you wish to secure the deck pieces in place, use the cheapest house caulk on top of the frames and use finish washers with stainless steel screws run down thru them, with a little bit of that bedding under the washers I also use either product for the entire bilge area, giving it a nice finished appearance and a coating that’s easy for cleaning. A point of note, the two part pigmented epoxy primers may run if applied to heavy on any vertical surfaces. So if the epoxy coatings do not seal the wood to a smooth finish, just let the first or second coat tack up and then recoat it as many times as you wish, until you are satisfied.

    2) The front space between frame 1 and the stem won't be under a hatch, I'm planning on sealing the limbers there and filling it with foam and sealing air tight. Any concerns with that? I'm guessing its too small a space to produce much pressure form heat expansion etc. The rear spaces to either side of the motor well are also sealed like this but wont be foam filled and will have an airtight deck hatch over each.

    Don’t mess with foaming the forward space. Just leave it open and you will be just fine.


    3) My plans have the front of the motor mount in two 18mm pieces for thickness. The 2nd piece is glued to the 1st, after the floor is glued down and extends over the back edge of the floor. This makes sense for a permanent floor, but could be an issue if I think I'd ever need to pull the deck off. Any reason not to make a join here where the motor well face is glued don over the back of the floor?

    I would go ahead and glue up the motor well. If you need a support for any and all deck boards because you run out of room, just put a wooden cleat fastened to the vertical of your bottom frames. If you have not filled the void of the bottom frame to the well face, then cut a wedge and go ahead and seal that small void off. I don’t recall if you did that in the building stage with the bottom upside down.

    If I missed something let me know.
    Last edited by erster; 11-04-2016 at 07:54 PM.
    Happy trails to you.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Thanks Erster. To be clear on the planned construction for the floors and hatches, I'm planning on having the floors glued down all over, but with 3 large 12" x 36" hatches up the length of the boat (maybe larger if needed). When open, these should give plenty of ventilation and the opening provides enough room to get my arm pretty deep under the floor on either side for cleaning, drying or touch up sealing if needed. With that in mind I was planning to seal the entire bilge well with epoxy and paint (cream paint to lighten it up) for protection against humidity. But the boat would be stored with all hatches open. That would allow me to build in the "built-in" style benched and console as well, epoxied into the side planks and floor for extra support since the boat will have no frames.

    Leaving the front frame area open is an option and will help with ventilation. Sealing it was to provide a little floatation, though I suppose it's not much. The rear quarters will also be air tight but have two smaller kayak style flush deck hatches for access and cleaning.

    I'm curious about the Tile clad an other coatings your recommended. Are these two part epoxy pants? Is that preferable to just sealing with straight epoxy and and painting over?

  13. #83
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    The Tile Clad, Polymide Coatings and the Devoe 4508, which I think has been changed because they were bought out???? is two part pigmented Epoxy coatings. I love it and its much more durable than any other paint that you can apply in the bilges. If the local dealers do not carry it, especially the Sherwin Williams, they should be able to order it. A two gallon kit runs about 120 to 140 bucks retail and gives you two gallons of product. Do the back sides of your deck boards too, or at least I would go that direction, as its thicker than coating them with straight epoxy. Roll it on any open areas and then just take a brush and hit the cracks or the edges where the roller cannot get in. And like I said the white can be tinted by most of the stores that will sell it, since they carry a special tinting agent, or so goes it on this side of the country. I also do all of my lockers with it, for a nice finish in lieu of any and all paints now.


    I do the under sides of my covering boards too. I bed the covering boards with a good Sika type bedding or don't even sand the landing areas on the back sides and they will still stick just fine with the fasteners if you put them down with the wet Tile Clad too. Its really hard to take back up without ripping the faces off of the inner cores like that too. But the two parts of the assorted brands do tack dry fairly quickly for recoating or fastening down. So dry fit everything before you coat them and stick them down in the tacky stage.

    Sorry for the numerous edits, my computer is messing up, Make sure you apply multiple coats on the back side, as one coat is not really thick enough for double duty, using it as a type of glue.
    Last edited by erster; 11-04-2016 at 09:09 PM.
    Happy trails to you.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    dmede, I feel your pain in guessing the right angle while building a boat. I've been there on guessing the best rocker for mine...but it will work out. I really think on your boat, less hook is better than too much...so I bet she will ride great. I would be very tempted to make a wedge as wide as the engine well and maybe 2 inches thick at the top, tapering to 1/4". The motor could hang over it, with holes lined up, so that the motor mounting bolts hold the wedge it place. This would get you a wider range of tilt, similar to a traditional transom. You could experiment with lowering the trim, and still be able to remove the wedge if it doesn't help.(This is all assuming the Simmons Sea Skill currently has a vertical motor well with no slope)
    Last edited by Mark O.; 03-26-2017 at 12:58 PM.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark O. View Post
    dmede, I feel your pain in guessing the right angle while building a boat. I've been there on guessing the best rocker for mine...but it will work out. I really think on your boat, less hook is better than too much...so I bet she will ride great. I would be very tempted to make a wedge as wide as the engine well and maybe 2 inches thick at the top, tapering to 1/4". The motor could hang over it, with holes lined up, so that the motor mounting bolts hold the wedge it place. This would get you a wider range of tilt, similar to a traditional transom. You could experiment with lowering the trim, and still be able to remove the wedge if it doesn't help.(This is all assuming the Simmons Sea Skill currently has a vertical motor well with no slope)
    Thanks Mark. The SS18 has a shallow angle to the motor well, but on the advice of erster and others I added about 2 degrees (I think) to accommodate newer outboard geometry. Hopefully that will be enough to allow a full range of trim.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Glued in floor cleats around motor well and started making the floor patterns. Will need to epoxy seal bilge area before hanging next planks (easier access while side are low). I'm in a catch 22 over the actual floor layout, it would be best to get it started now before sides get taller, but I won't really know if my layout idea will work until I can sit in the boat with sides on and mock it up. So I guess it's 1) seal and paint bilge 2) hang remaining planks 3) mock up layout.






  17. #87
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Need to buy my floor (or deck) panels next week for rough fitting. The original plans have deck covering boards that are loose, I'm planning to glue down my deck like the WB article, but use a series of long hatches to get full access to the bilge. Original plans are 3/8 ply and WBs are 1/2" MDO. I'm thinking of using 1/2" maranti marine (no MDO to easily find locally). Any opinions on that plan?

  18. #88
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    dmede -

    I have a SSS18 that I built a while back. I glued down a working deck as you propose per the WB article. Happy with that choice.

    I too questioned the 3/8" (9mm) thickness for the working deck. I threw down a piece of 9mm ocuume loose and tromped on it - the flex was unacceptable to me so I went with 1/2" (12mm) ocuume, screwed (or nailed? cant remember) down and glassed over. I used dynel (I think) which as others have mentioned is a real epoxy sponge.

    Anyhow, thinking back, you gain a lot of stiffness when you nail it down and glass it, so possibly 3/8" would be adequate? Can't say.
    But when a large commercial fisherman leapt off his boat into mine (good story) I was glad I went with the 1/2" material.

    Separate note - I was amazed at how small the finished boat is inside. I love it, but when you lose the volume of the fore deck, motor well, console, it ends up to be amazing small for an 18-Ft boat.

    Sorry I have not provided you with any input until now, but you have been getting good advice, based on what I know. Glad to answer any questions you may have.
    Bill

  19. #89
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Thanks for the info! Glad to have another SSS18 builder to check my ideas with. Please feel free to chime in on this build anytime, with the weather clearing I'll be posting more often now.

    My thinking follows yours I think, that 3/8 might give just a little too much flex. I'm building without frames, using the side deck method, so maybe that's enough of a reason to use stiffer deck. Assuming you didn't notice the extra weight? I'd probably use the same 1/2" meranti for the seats and console.

    I'm really curious to see how I find the size once it's all done. I'm a small guy at 5'8" and 150#, kids are still relatively small too! And compared to my 14" skiff it's a big step up. But I can see that it could be tight if not laid out right. I'm hoping that my layout with side benches instead of thwarts will help open it up by keeping the center open and putting seats tight against the steeply angled sides. We'll see if that plan works out in reality.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    making pattern for mid area on boat and made a disturbing discovery... one frame is somehow out of square by a full 1/2" - 5/8" (about 1/4" at each end). I squared and re squared the frames so many times during the initial set up, I don't have any idea how I missed this. I must have tugged it out of alignment when I put in the cleats on the strong back to set it in place. It doesn't seem to have affected the curve of the chine that I can see (all looks fair). But it pisses me off! Having a much harder time keeping things fair and aligned on this boat than my last for some reason, despite the seemingly less complicated plank layout. Hopefully not a big issue, but a reminder to pay more attention!

  21. #91
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    2nd coat of epoxy going on in bilge, ordered 1 gal of Kirbys semi gloss sand. This will be color of full interior of the boat as well as bilge final coating. I'll rough in the floor boards after paint before I get to the rest of the side planks.

    One thing I keep wondering about as I'm in there working on the bilge is how I'll do drainage. I'm sealing up the two small bilge areas either side of the motor well as air tight storage (will have sealed hatches on top for access). The final frame at the face of the motor well has been sealed so there is no air or water passage between the main hull and these two areas. Water that makes it into the hull (mostly from washing out probably) will flow down either side of the keelson to the back frame as well as over the top deck to both sides of the motor well. If I were to drain each area that could pool water, I'd need four drain plugs into my motor well. That seems a bit much to me! Looking for suggestions on how to drain these areas.

    I could raise the back two pockets so water over the top of the deck is stopped and flows down into the bilge to be drained by port and starboard drain plugs. But I prefer the idea of a full flat deck.


  22. #92
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Bilge sealed with 2 coats epoxy, 2 coats Kirby's. Cut 1/2 marine ply to shape for back half of deck, pattern for mid section ready to go. Should have all three deck sections cut and in place by end of weekend.



  23. #93
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Made a stupid mistake today. Getting out front deck panel from pattern and forgot to expand for the top. So finished panel is narrow by about 1/2" total, 1/4" extra gap on both sides (with edges already beveled to match plank angle).

    I'm epoxying these decks down. Other than my pride, is there any issue to filling the gap with extra epoxy and filler? It's about a 4' long section, I hate to waste it and I think it will be ok to fill. Once painted, should be invisible.





  24. #94
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    This by the way is why I usually work from a list, so I don't forget basic ****!

    edited to add: really, I can't type $#!t here? ^^^

  25. #95
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Should be OK, but to save expensive epoxy, I'd push a 1/4 strip into the glue on both edges.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  26. #96
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Taking a break from fitting floors, glued up the next plank today. Will fit and glue the other side this week. Then I'll be half way through the planking!





  27. #97
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Looking like progress.

    3/8" is plenty for the deck. There is a frame every 12". 3/4" will suffice structurally with framing on 24" centers if you think about the loads typically imposed on that practice. Just about everywhere both feet can possibly land in that hull will be near a frame, even if you land perfectly between them. I used 3/8" and the deck is perfectly sound. These are important places to save weight collectively over the build when you can.

    I didn't use the hidden bevel on the last frame for drainage at the last frame/motor well but glued it tight. I never get water in those two little compartments, but if I did, I would install additional drain plugs there and that is what I had planned to do in the event of.

    When I put the trailer under the boat, I left the back of the cradle holding the rear of the boat and a temporary prop under the middle. after I got the rear keel roller to contact the front of the keel, I was able to shove the boat most of the way on and just winched it the rest of the way. As it is now, even with the 200lb motor on the back, I am able to shove the boat either way to perfectly center it after it's loaded. IIRC, my finished hull weight without the motor was around 380 lbs.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Thanks Pipefiter. I think you're right, 3/8 would be fine, but I opted for 1/2" (or 12mm) anyway. I like the idea of a little extra thickness since I'll be glueing helm and seats directly to the floor, and not through to the frames.

    I can't remember without looking for your build thread, did you have a raised deck around the motor well? That keeps all of your above deck water fore of the motor well face I think. I'm keeping those side areas level with the rest of the deck so I think I'll need to have 1 drain either side of the well, and one on the CL in the bilge. I'm still thinking about how best to deal with this though.

    Good to hear about the weight. I'll be a little over I'm sure, but should be manageable for getting on trailer. I'll have to come up with some kid of temp bracing in the middle of the cradle like you do to keep it from scraping it dropping as it goes on. But that's a ways off still!

  29. #99
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Pulled all the clamps just now. Finding that I'm having a harder time with epoxy and ply then traditional construction. Ply is too pliable! I screwed something up in the transom angle or aft frames that led to hard spot in the bottom plank just along side the motor well. The 2nd plank looked like it was covering it up fully but as I pulled the clamps I could see a hard spot in the 2nd plank as well. I'd adjusted the transom angle and allowed a small gap (epoxy filled) between plank 1 and 2 where the un fair section was that looked like it was correcting it, but the clamps make it impossible to see the real curve until you pull them after glue up. Frustrating. Hoping the next plank will remove it fully and be fully fair, but hard to tell.





  30. #100
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Progress in the slowest Sea Skiff build ever... last two planks glued on over the weekend!








  31. #101
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    I screwed something up way back at the chine or frame construction phase and had to chase some unfairness up each plank until I got to the top planks. There was a flat spot near the back quarter, just forward of the motor well. By the final plank it was mostly gone but still requires pushing out a bit (hence the spreader) to keep fair. I'm hoping the rigid side decking will keep that shape firm.

    I have a question now about next steps. I'm planning to build frameless, which requires a side deck to keep the hull from flexing. Most builds with side decks on the SSS18 seem to have the side deck perpendicular to the planks with a smooth transition to the front deck. I want to be able to use that side deck as a step in and out of the boat and was planning to adjust the angles to make the side deck flatter (not totally level,, but not fully perpendicular either). Opinions? One of my concerns is ho w to do the side to front deck transition.

  32. #102
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    SF Bay Area - Redwood City
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Here's a mockup of what I think the side deck pieces need to be. Left is with deck perpendicular to the planks, right is level to the floor, and center is with a slight rise, about 6*.

    There are other questions I need to answer like should the inwale be perpendicular to the side deck or always horizontal. And should I put a lip on the top inner edge of the deck to keep drips out.

    Aslo, do I have the arrangement right? Should the side deck lay over to the top of the rub rail (I think that's what Carnell describes) or inside it as shown?


  33. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Fredericksburg, Virginia
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    I vote for an average of options 2 and 3, and with the coaming bumped up a little to keep water out. You will have geometric constraints at the foredeck (and the transom) as you stated.

    The rubrail capping the edgegrain of the deck is good, but it means that the deck is only glued to the topsides and rubrail via the edgegrain. This is a weak shear connection. Same goes for your connection of the coaming to deck. You could epoxy fillet these, or add a sheer clamp and coaming nailer longitudinals.

    I have never looked at the Sea Skiff plans that I can remember. Others must have worked out these details over the years.

  34. #104
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    Jun 2003
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Adding stringers along the top inner edge of the sheer makes sense. Same for a coaming nailer. I guess that would be best to set into the side deck knees. I'll mock that up to see how that looks.

    I'm not worried about the side deck to transom join or transition, the deck will just land on the top of my transom side knees as whatever angle is natural with the top curve of transom standing proud of the deck at that point. No deck for the transom as some have done.

    At the foredeck I think I'll do the same and let the angles of the side deck and foredeck differ with the side deck landing on some kind of splash board that ends the foredeck. This may end up being a whole bulkhead as I may want to be able to close that area up with a small door or hatch.

  35. #105
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    Jun 2003
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    Default Re: New build: Simmons Sea Skiff 18'

    Here's updated sketch of the side decks. Purple bit are the planks and side decking of course. Orange are the rub rail and coaming. Green are the longitudinal pieces to help support the deck, these are set into knees that are glued and screwed to the side plank. The grey back shows the rough angle of intersection with either the transom top curve or the foredeck.

    I don't want to bother with trying to keep a constant angle to the side deck so I'm just going to pick a set angle off the top plank and allow the side deck angle to roll a little as it goes from transom to fore deck. As long as it's less steep than perpendicular to the top plank I think it will help with stepping in and out and be less complex to construct. Me not good with angles!

    The key difference in the two examples is the angle of the inner longitudinal and the coaming piece. It can either be set perfectly horizontal or perpendicular to the side deck angle. Perpendicular to side deck is again easier but may not look right.


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