Results 1 to 29 of 29

Thread: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    As some of you might know, I have been interested in Robert Manry's Tinkerbelle boat since I first read his book.

    On June 1, 1965 Robert Manry, a copy editor for the Plain Dealer and a Willowick, Ohio resident, left Falmouth, Massachusetts aboard his 13.5-foot sailboat, Tinkerbelle, to begin his voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. He arrived in Falmouth, England seventy-eight days later on August 17, 1965. At the time of the crossing Tinkerbelle was the smallest boat to have ever crossed the Atlantic.
    I am now making plans to visit the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection in Cleveland Ohio in less than two weeks from now specifically to see this boat and I hope to take a lot of pictures which I intend to share on this forum. I have never been to this museum before so I don't know exactly what to expect or exactly what is there related to this boat and the voyage.

    I was going to wait until I got back to post anything here but wanted to give others a chance to give me suggestions or requests for specific pictures you might want to see. I don't expect to be able to get as close as I would like to the actual boat but there is supposed to be a "replica" that you can touch and climb in.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    247

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I would be interested to know if you can find out what the original serial number is for Tinkerbelle and I can provide a copy of her original build record from the factory. It should be stamped in the keelson in the middle of the aft cockpit. I also have a thick folder of correspondence between Manry and the Old Town Canoe Company with many clippings about his trip if you or anyone else is interested. Thanks,

    Benson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Thanks Benson,

    I have sent the museum a message warning them of my upcoming visit and asking about the serial number. If possible, I will get that information. I am very interested in any and all information I can get about this boat. If you could post any or all of that correspondence, I would love to see it. You can send me a private message and I will give you my Email address if that is a better option. A digital camera can usually get a readable copy of printed pages. If you want to Email copies of this correspondence to me, I will post it to my Flickr account and post them here for all to see.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    247

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I have just scanned the information that is most likely to interest you as shown in the links below. Manry estimated that the boat "was about 30 years old" when he purchased it used in 1958. This doesn't seem likely since the model was first listed in the 1940 catalog. The rest of the file is mostly newspaper clippings about the trip that are probably available elsewhere. There was a good story with pictures in the Life magazine from September 17th, 1965 as shown at http://www.ebay.com/itm/251562317746 so you may want to get a copy if you haven't already. Let me know if there is anything else that I can do to help. Thanks,

    Benson



    Initial letter from Manry, 1/25/65
    Response from Old Town, 1/28/65
    Response from Manry, 2/3/65
    Letter from Old Town, 10/4/65
    Advertising agreement
    Picture of Manry supplied with agreement
    Catalog page from 1966
    Catalog page from 1940
    Possible build record

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    You can read that Life magazine article here and one from Cleveland Magazine. I couldn't get the last article on the linked page to download but my internet connection might be too slow right now.

    The person who answers Emails for the museum site is gone for the weekend so I will have to wait until at least Monday to get a response about the serial number.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,145

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    That should be a great experience. I too have been fascinated by his journey since reading the book some 40 years ago. I look forward to seeing your pictures of her.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I'm still waiting for a reply about the serial number but I did get a confirmation that Tinkerbelle is still on dispay at the museum. Here is the reply I got so far:

    Hi Brian,

    We're glad to hear of your plans to visit the WRHS History Center! Tinkerbelle IS on display currently...along with plenty of information about Manry's trip. We also have a replica of the boat for children to play in on-site nearby the original.

    As for the serial number, I am copying Ann Sindelar, WRHS' Reference Supervisor...she should be able to help you with that part of your request.

    Thanks! Enjoy your visit.
    Alyssa
    I'm wondering if the serial number might be covered up by the addition of the self-bailing cockpit or even possibly moved. Hopefully they have that information somewhere like on the title or registration for the boat if it happens to be hidden.

    I hope to get as many pictures as I possibly can of everything they have on display. I really hope to get some good pictures of the mast tabernacle and the keel-daggerboard setup on the original boat. The other thing I hope to get close enough to see on the original boat is how the self-bailing cockpit works. That one might be tough to get without stepping over the rope.

    If there are any more requests for specific pictures or information, let me know. My trip is on July 2, 2014.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    With my trip now only 1 week away, I have been re-reading Tinkerbelle looking for as much information as I could find about this boat.

    Here is a section copied from the book with some information in bold that I thought looked important for someone thinking of recreating this boat.

    So, for the second time since she had become ours, the boat underwent something like a nautical metamorphosis. I was adequately skillful with woodworking tools, having taken a manual-training course in high school, and had acquired from my reading a sufficient understanding of boat-designing principles to plan and execute the metamorphosis with confidence. It required a full year of spare-time labor to complete the transformation, but when it was done Tinkerbelle was a proper little yacht, with a cabin, cockpit, running lights, compass and other gear usually found on much larger vessels.

    Instead of her original centerboard, she now had a daggerboard-keel that could be moved up and down by winch in the slot of a watertight housing that passed through the keel timber and extended upward through the cabin roof. When the daggerboard-keel was retracted, Tinkerbelle could be moved onto a trailer without difficulty, and when it was lowered it provided the same lateral resistance the centerboard had supplied, plus a dividend of increased stability, for it was made of iron plate and weighed a little more than a hundred pounds.
    The cabin roof's height above the deck was proportionately much greater in Tinkerbelle than it was in larger sailboats and this detracted somewhat from her appearance, but there were three good reasons for making this dimension as ample as practicable: to give plenty of headroom in the cabin; to house (in the through-cabin slot) as deep a daggerboard-keel as possible, and thus (when the daggerboard-keel was down) lower the hull's center of gravity to the maximum, and to provide, in effect, additional freeboard, thus raising the hull's center of buoyancy.
    The second and third factors, taken together, reduced the chance of a capsize and also mightily improved the prospect of righting the boat if she should happen to be overturned.
    Abaft the self-bailing cockpit was a lazarette, accessible through a small hatch at the stern and separated from the rest of the boat by a watertight bulkhead. By bolting down the lazarette and cabin hatches, the hull now could be sealed shut, giving it many of the storm-weathering properties of, say, a corked bottle. This, it seemed to me, was approaching the ultimate in seaworthiness.
    I also made a new mast, eight inches taller than the original, so that the boom would be high enough to clear the cabin top, and hinged in a tabernacle to permit easy raising and lowering. The hull's lapstrake planking was coated with white fiberglass, and the cabin top, cockpit foot well and deck were coated with red fiberglass, the deck also being treated with an anti-skid preparation.
    When all the work was done, Tinkerbelle looked like a brand-new boat. Her white hull, red deck and cabin top and varnished mast, cockpit seats and cabin sides gleamed in the sunshine. She was a thing of beauty, at least to me, and there was no disputing the fact that no other boat like her existed anywhere in the world. She had a place all her own.
    By the way, the voyage of Tinkerbelle and Robert Manry was from June 1, 1965 to August 17, 1965 a total of 78 days at sea.

    Doing a little calculating tells me that next year (2015) will be the 50th anniversary of the trip. A little less than a year in case anyone wants to re-enact this historic adventure.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Anyone interested in this boat and trip has probably already seen this video but it is a good interview with Robert Manry as he got close to finishing his trip. It's too bad that his own newspaper didn't get the first interview but...

    Last edited by Sea Dreams; 07-01-2014 at 08:00 AM. Reason: Add link

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Here's part two of the video interview.



    Still no reply about the serial number. Hopefully I'll be able to find it at the museum.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    NEW PLAN!!! My excuse for traveling to Cleveland has been rescheduled for July 11, 2014. Maybe that will give them more time to respond to the serial number question. Oh well, I've waited this long to visit Tinkerbelle, a little longer shouldn't hurt.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I should be leaving tomorrow morning to go see Tinkerbelle. I did get a response about the serial number but it wasn't exactly what I hoped for.

    Hello Brian:

    Alyssa sent me a copy of your email note.

    I'm not certain if our WRHS Research Library archives will include the type of information you seek. However, it's important to note that our Library collection includes the Manry Journal. Perhaps you can stop in the Library on July 11th and make a request to see it. Here is a link to the collection's descriptive finding aid:
    http://ead.ohiolink.edu/xtf-ead/view...&brand=default

    [ADDED HERE: Collection consists of a logbook, notebook of sextant sightings, charts, several letters, and notes, relating to Manry's 78-day crossing of the Atlantic Ocean.]

    Here is a link to our WRHS online catalogs:

    http://www.wrhs.org/research/Search_Collections

    I hope this information is helpful.

    Ann
    I didn't think I could fit both the museum and the library visit in one visit and didn't want to pay a separate $10 admission to view the paperwork which might (but probably doesn't contain the serial number). Ann replied again with this message:

    Hello Brian:

    There is one entrance fee for our University Circle site. This includes entrance to the History Museum, Crawford Auto Aviation Museum and Library. (I can see Tinkerbelle from my desk...looking out the Library Doors!)

    We don't allow camera's in the Library Reading Room, but you are free to take snapshots of the Tinkerbelle exhibit.

    Ann
    If I can find that serial number I will but it isn't looking good. I should have some pictures in a couple days to share. Until then, here's an edited and cropped picture I found online of Tinkerbelle showing what I think is the front navigation light. Anyone want to confirm or correct that thought?



    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian
    Last edited by Sea Dreams; 07-10-2014 at 03:09 PM. Reason: Add info from link

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,145

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Hope you have a great trip and are able to see Tinkerbell 'up close & personal'. Good luck with the serial number, that would be interesting information.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Well, I made it to the museum and got to see the REAL Tinkerbelle boat. No luck with the serial number. I didn't get anywhere near the number of pictures I expected to of the boat. It is in a corner and blocked with chains so I couldn't get all the angles I wanted.

    Here's a good side shot of Tinkerbell.



    and the Full size version if anyone wants it.


    Here's the other side.



    Full size version.


    One of the items on display from the original voyage was the canvas bucket used as a sea anchor. I didn't see any mention of this bucket having "other" uses. I enlarged and pasted the label from the display case about this bucket.



    Just In case ... Full size version again.

    They also had a replica of Tinkerbelle at the museum that you could get close to and climb in. I really should have crawled inside or taken measurements but I DIDN'T. Maybe if I go again someday.



    Full size.




    Here's a somewhat fuzzy picture of the replica.



    Fuzzy Full size version.

    There's a few more pictures to upload and share but this is a start.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Another picture of the Tinkerbelle replica front view.



    Full size.

    Rear view of Tinkerbelle replica.



    Full size.

    One thing that you can notice about this boat is the tiny amount of space in the cockpit. I couldn't get in the right position to tell how the original Tinkerbelle's self-draining cockpit worked and the replica didn't include that feature that I could see.

    The replica has a toy-like look to it that could be caused from the missing trim and other finishing parts.

    Notice the difference a little trim, some cables and ropes, and other finishing touches makes with the real boat.



    Full size.


    Here's a closer look at the front of the cabin and the mast tabernacle.



    Full size.

    By zooming in on the last two pictures, I could count the screws in the rings around the windows. Sides have 16 screws each and the front has 12 screws.

    Here's a picture that shows the daggerboard. I don't know enough about how it worked to even tell where the lines are connected or even if what I'm seeing is the daggerboard or just the frame to hold/lift it.



    Full size.


    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Before I post the rest of my trip pictures, I thought I'd check out posting pictures from The Robert Manry Project Facebook page. I'm not sure if they are public photos or if you have to sign in.



    That picture interests me because it shows just how small the "cockpit" is on Tinkerbelle. If you zoom right in to the top left on that picture, I think there is his sewing kit and probably a roll of tape over the part that I'm trying to figure out.



    I think that it might be a small "porthole" with a compass safely mounted underneath inside the cabin but I could be wrong. I couldn't get in the right position to see inside the cockpit of the real boat and the replica didn't have that feature. Seems like as good a place as any to mount it.

    EDIT: I confirmed that it is a bridge deck compass.

    Back to my own pictures. Here is part of a display at the museum showing a button (which I copied and pasted from another photo) along with Robert's marlinspike and knife.


    Full Size version.

    Back to the facebook page. Here is a nice color photo of Tinkerbelle.



    Zooming in, I think another part I wasn't sure about might just be holders for the oars.



    Full Size.

    A few pictures left for the next post. I hope somebody, someday finds these pictures and information useful.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian
    Last edited by Sea Dreams; 07-14-2014 at 01:31 PM. Reason: confimation about compass location

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,145

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Thanks for the great pictures of her! It is nice to see that she is being well cared for. It must have been rewarding to finally see her in person. Perhaps the question of her S.N. can be solved another day.

    Thanks!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    One thing on display at the museum (in a glass display case) was a broken piece of Tinkerbelle's spare rudder.



    Full size picture.

    Although I couldn't get in the right position to see Tinkerbelle's original rudder, here is the optional, fixed rudder from the August 1967 Mechanix Illustrated plans along with the approximate lengths.



    As you can see, the part that broke was probably only a couple inches wide and it doesn't look that thick. It doesn't surprise me that they broke.

    Here's what was written in the logbook when the first rudder broke.

    Quote Originally Posted by From Manry's logbook
    Thursday, June 17

    Found a nice breeze blowing when I awoke. Clouds cover the sky, but the barometer is holding up so Iím hoping for the best. Iíll have to eat a hasty breakfast and get going. It was good sailing but a bit damp with spray flying back from the bow. SE wind allowed me to hold course of about 80ļ. It rained intermittently during the day.
    About noon I almost slammed into a shark that was lollygagginí at the surface, its dorsal fin sticking out of the water. I guess it must have been about 10 feet long. A little later, in the afternoon the rudder gave way. The wood at the top had become soaked and just bent around under the strain. Lucky I had a spare which I put on. Later on Iíll see what I can do to repair the original.
    Wind eventually got too strong for both sails so I took down the main and went on under genoa alone. Still made good time. Hope Iím near the 57ļW. meridian by now.
    At dark I put out the sea anchor and prepared to bed down for the night. I happened to look out the port porthole a while later and there was a light. At first I thought it was the moon rising, but on poking my head outside I saw it was a ship headed toward me. I tried the horn. It gave a feeble blast and quit. I attached the spotlight but couldnít get it to work. So then I turned on the masthead and red-green running lights (already had the anchor light up) and hoped for the best. The ship passed to the west of me about a Ĺ mile away.
    The waves made it a pretty rough night, but it would have been much rougher if Iíd had to spend it in the cockpit. The cabin makes a world of difference.


    From the Tinkerbelle book, he describes it:

    Quote Originally Posted by From Tinkerbelle book
    About noon the next day Tinkerbelle almost slammed into a shark that was lallygagging at the surface with its dorsal fin sticking out of the water; I think it must have been sleeping. It was eight or nine feet long, not very big as sharks go.
    In midafternoon we had our first serious mishap: the rudder broke.
    The fiberglass covering of the rudder had cracked near the stock where the tiller fitted onto it, and water had seeped through the crack to the quarter-inch plywood underneath, causing it to soften. Finally, the enormous strain set up by the opposing pressures of water on the rudder and my pull on the tiller caused the stock to snap. I thanked my lucky stars that I'd brought along a spare. In less than five minutes it was in place and we were moving again.



    The second time the rudder broke was described in the logbook:

    Quote Originally Posted by From logbook
    Sunday, July 11

    (passed 40ļW)
    Well, this is the day when we have to enter the W 30s. I awoke (by alarm clock) at dawn so as to get in as much sailing as possible. Looks like itís going to be another dull, cloudy day. The wind seems a bit strong for comfort.
    During the night the wind shifted from west to northwest. The shift has made it considerably cooler, but Iíll be able to reach rather than run. I just hope it doesnít get so stormy I have to quit and put out the sea anchor. Well, now, up and at it.
    The wind was strong and the waves seemed huge (some 20 footers, I think), but Tinkerbelle boiled along under genoa only. The weather seemed very threatening until just after noon and then it cleared up and turned into a lovely sunny day. But just about that time the rudder went ďsnapĒ. Brother! This will put me back three days, if not more.

    Iíve started a repair job on the original rudder, it seemed more repairable. Fortunately I brought a couple of pieces of hard wood with me, plus plenty of tools, brass bolts, etc., fiberglass, glue, too. I just hope it isnít too damp to do the job properly. Shortly after the rudder broke, while I was trying to get organized for the repair job, a wave came along and knocked me out of the boat. I scrambled back. Then, a few minutes later, a wave jostled the boat violently and I lost my balance and went overboard again.
    It was horrible to have such a lovely day and not be able to move. I took a sun sight though and found Iím almost up to W40. Just three or four miles to go. Then Iíll be in the 30s and at 37W, Iíll be half way.
    When I started repairing the rudder I found some of my important tools had rusted solid, especially the hand drill and clamp pliers. I melted some Vaseline and finally, using it as oil, worked the tools into operation.
    The ocean went calm in the evening. Considerate of it to do that at a time like this. Iíve just found a clipping Virginia must have put in this notebook. It tells about Lindbergh crossing the Atlantic. He became exhausted and felt he could go no farther. Then he made a simple prayer: ďGod give me strength.Ē From that moment he sensed ďan element of spiritĒ which took control of both mind and body and helped him get through.
    I couldnít have found this at a more appropriate time for the rudder difficulty has left me quite depressed although Iím not in any real danger. Itís just that what is beginning to seem like an interminably long voyage will now be that much longer. The clipping makes me feel better. Bless Virginia for putting it in the notebook. I sure do love her. Sheís the most wonderful person I know.
    Tinkerbelle and I will make it all right. Itís just that I hate to be so far behind schedule, because I know V. and others will worry. If the rudder hadnít broken I would have made a good distance that day because I started at daybreak instead of later, as I had been doing.
    If I keep on using all the daylight hours for sailing I may catch up a bit on my schedule.
    And, a couple days later he writes:

    Quote Originally Posted by From logbook
    Tuesday, July 13

    Todayís the day we get going again and test the repaired rudder, Lord! I hope it holds up. If it doesnít, Iíll really be in a spot. It certainly seems strong enough to me.

    ...
    And on the next day:

    Quote Originally Posted by From logbook
    Wednesday, July 14

    Cloudy wet morning. Iíve stopped for breakfast. Repaired rudder holding up OK so far, but I can feel terrific strains being put on it. Hope it can take it. Tiller seems to be coming unglued in one place. Iíll tighten down the bolt and then I think itíll be OK.

    ...

    Continued next post












  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I hope I'm not violating any copyrights too bad by posting these quotes but they are needed to fully appreciate a picture of a broken bit of wood. You really should read the book "Tinkerbelle" if you haven't read it and, even if you have read it, it is the kind of book you can read over again many times.

    Quote Originally Posted by From Tinkerbelle book
    My spirits were beginning to soar when, crrraaack! The rudder snapped, rendering Tinkerbelle unsteerable.
    It took me a few minutes to collect my wits and formulate a plan of action to deal with this crisis, but eventually I got organized and started to repair the original rudder, the one that had broken first, as it seemed to be the more reparable of the two. While I was pulling myself together, a breaking wave crest caught Tinkerbelle beam on and knocked her down, plopping me into the ocean for the fifth time. The boat righted herself at once, good girl that she was, and I scrambled back onto her very quickly, for by that time I had amassed considerable boarding experience (I knew exactly what to do to get back on her with the least effort and loss of time) and I immediately threw out the drogue so that the knockdown wouldn't be repeated.
    It was desolating to have such a fine day and not be able to sail, but the cruel fact had to be faced-and dealt with. I gathered together my tools and, with pieces of oak, brass bolts, fiberglass and waterproof glue, went to work on the rudder in the relative comfort of the cabin.
    Late in the afternoon I took a sun shot. It indicated we were only three or four miles away from 40į W longitude, but the news cheered me scarcely at all. I wasn't in despair, for I knew I could fix the rudder. I was as confident as ever that we'd reach England safely. But the enforced halt for repairs and the slowness of our progress made me melancholy. I missed Virginia and Robin and Douglas, and I didn't want to be delayed and cause them unnecessary concern.
    "Tinkerbelle and I will make it all right," I wrote in the log, "but I hate to be so far behind schedule because I think V. and the kids may worry."
    By nightfall I had stewed myself into a state of severe depression. For a few frantic moments I even considered swinging southeastward, once the rudder was serviceable again, and making for the Flores, in the Azores. But after dinner that evening, as I was writing of the day's events, I spotted the tip of a piece of paper sticking out from between the pages of the spiral-bound notebook that served as my log. I pulled it out. It was a leaf from a little booklet that only Virginia could have put there. It said, in part:

    "Charles A. Lindbergh, flying the Atlantic alone, came to the point where he could go no farther. He was exhausted. His hands were so tired they refused to obey his mind. Then he said he made this simple prayer: 'God give me strength.' From that moment on he declares that he sensed a third part of himself. It was 'an element of spirit,' which took control of both mind and body, 'guarding them as a wise father guards his children'."
    Finding this message at that moment of utter dejection was a bit of a miracle, for I desperately needed something or someone to snap me out of it. Despite my having been reared by missionaries, I have never been able to get on intimate terms with God (not that I wouldn't like to), so I cannot attribute its appearance on the scene to divine intervention. Nevertheless, it satisfied a keenly felt psychological hunger. The content of the message was helpful, of itself, but what did most to lift my sagging spirits, I think, was the realization of the loving devotion that led Virginia to slip the message into my log. That gave me strength and elevated my mood. Before long I was back on even keel.
    The ocean was calm the next day (July 12th), so calm we couldn't have moved even if the rudder hadn't been broken. That was O.K. with me, for it meant we weren't missing out on a favorable breeze.
    I finished the repairs and all that remained was to wait overnight for the waterproof glue to harden. We'd be able to sail in the morning. I felt like my old self, and that evening I took a sextant shot at the sun that made me feel even better. It showed that while I'd been working on the rudder the Gulf Stream had carried us eastward past the meridian of 40į W longitude. We had completed another giant stride toward our journey's end and had passed the point of no return.

    On Tuesday, July 13th, after nearly two days of drifting to the sea anchor while working on the rudder, we started sailing again and it soon became evident the repair job would hold up. The rudder was now as strong as iron; I expected no further trouble from it.
    Still more pictures left to upload.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Thanks for the great pictures of her! It is nice to see that she is being well cared for. It must have been rewarding to finally see her in person. Perhaps the question of her S.N. can be solved another day.

    Thanks!
    It looks like the only way to find the serial number would be to examine the original boat and possibly open a hatch or somehow gain access under the cockpit floor or wherever that number might be. They didn't seem to think they had any paperwork like a title that would have the serial number.

    My thoughts after seeing this boat in person are mixed. I hoped that Tinkerbelle would have her own room with items and pictures from her trip all around. Maybe even some videos of the news footage and copies of newspaper articles. There was actually a pretty good display with the original boat, the reproduction boat, and a double sided, tall display case with stuff inside. Unfortunately, some of my pictures didn't turn out good enough. It's hard to take good pictures through glass.

    I am still interested in building a copy of this boat. I would like it to be as close to the original Tinkerbelle as possible but, since I probably will never take it to salt water, I am thinking that what I really want is not necessarily Tinkerbelle, but just something similar that I could use for overnight adventures. At least by seeing the actual boat, some parts of the plans make more sense.

    I might make it back to the museum again someday if/when I actually start building a Tinkerbelle-like boat but with around an 8 hour round trip driving time, I'm not setting any dates yet. It was well worth going to and there was a lot more on display than just Tinkerbelle.


    Full size picture.

    This is a 1901 Oldsmobile that is also on display at the museum. I once had plans and big dreams of building a replica of this car.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    More quotes from the Tinkerbelle book:

    Quote Originally Posted by From Tinkerbelle book
    I had hoped to continue sailing all that night, but at about 1 A.M., Sunday, August 1st [1965], a thunderstorm hit us. I streamed the drogue and, buttoning Tinkerbelle up tight, got into the cabin out of the blustery, wet weather. All that day and through the night we remained parked to the drogue. It was comfortable enough inside, away from the wind and rain, but it was nerve-wracking to have to stay put when I wanted so much to be moving and end our long voyage. And the whitecaps that slapped the boat every now and then didn't add to my peace of mind.
    To help pass the time I decided to launch a bottle with a note inside, just for the fun of seeing if anyone found it. I wrote this message:


    "To the finder: This bottle is being released in the Atlantic Ocean at about 48į 30' N, 19į 10' W on Aug. 1, 1965.


    "If you will send this message with your name and address -with information on where you found the bottle and when-to Robert Manry, 31003 Royalview Drive, Willowick, Ohio, U.S.A.-he will send you $5 to compensate you for the trouble. Thank you.'


    I put the message in an empty plastic bottle that had contained part of my supply of drinking water, screwed on the cap and tossed it into the ocean. It floated so high in the water that the northwest wind got a good grip on it and blew it rapidly into the southeast. It was soon out of sight.
    Two months later, after completing the voyage, I was back at my home in Willowick and had forgotten all about the message and bottle, when a letter came from Franciso Maria Baleizao, a resident of a suburban town near Lisbon, Portugal. The letter, in difficult English, said:
    "Dear Sir: I find your message on 25th September at three o'clock P.M. in Praia Beach, Sintra, Portugal. I wait, then you send me $5 to compensate. Thank you."
    My message, tattered now, apparently from the beating it received as the bottle in which it traveled rolled over and over on its way to Portugal, was enclosed with Mr. Baleizao's letter. I was surprised and delighted to receive both. The five dollars I had promised and a ten-dollar bonus were on their way to him in short order, and in a subsequent letter, written in Portuguese, he told me a little about himself.
    "I was born in a picturesque village of Baixo Alentejuo called Moura, on March 27, 1925," he wrote. "I resided there until the age of twenty, but because of poverty of the area I moved into surroundings of Lisbon, where I have been for the last twenty years. I am a mason by profession. I am married and my wife's name is Gracinda Pechoso Baleizao. I like all sports, but like bicycle racing the best. However, I practice none of them. My parents lived in the Hawaiian Islands close to seven years."
    I was pleased that my message was found, but especially pleased that it was found by a man who apparently could use the token reward I offered. I was happy, too, that it was found by a Portuguese because some of the world's greatest seamen have come from Portugal: Prince Henry the Navigator, the stern bachelor who, although he never sailed himself, founded Europe's first school of navigation and sponsored numerous voyages of discovery; Bartholomew Diaz, discoverer of the Cape of Good Hope; Vasco da Gama, who, following on Diaz's heels, reached the riches of India, and, naturally, Ferdinand Magellan, whose fleet was the first to circle the globe.
    In the evening on Friday, August 6th , six days after releasing the bottled note, I wrote in the log:
    "This was a nice sailing day-sunny, with fluffy clouds. I can hardly believe I'm getting all this good weather. It's quite a switch. Hope it continues.
    "We're about halfway to 14į W (it's now 6 P.M. T.T.). I've just finished a huge supper of curried turkey and peas. I'll go on sailing until it starts getting dark. Then I'll size things up and decide whether to stop for sleep or go on all night. This good weather should be used to the fullest.



    Full Size - still not readable.


    Full Size.


    Full Size.



    Full Size.


    Full Size.

    Just a few more pictures to go.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Here's a picture of Tinkerbelle and her fittings. Number 14 (Woops...I meant 15) was one thing I was questioning. Now I know. This picture has a lot of information hidden away.


    Full Size.

    My picture that showed what the numbers were did not turn out but I found it online. You have to click on Tinkerbelle and her fittings.

    1. Chocks for mooring lines
    2. Half-inch dacron line wrapped around mast, with swivel shackle at forward end for attaching sea-anchor line
    3. Mooring cleat
    4. Red and green combination running light
    5. Case for six-volt battery powering all lights
    6. Fixture to facilitate tying down supplies securely
    7. Switches to control running light, stern light and masthead light
    8. Porthole with 3/8-inch plastic cover to prevent breakage by waves
    9. Barometer
    10. Fire extinguisher
    11. Lowered daggerboard-keel
    12. Jam cleat for sheet used with small jib
    13. Bilge pump
    14. Handhold
    15. Bridge-deck compass
    16. Bronze strap for attaching lifeline
    17. Self-bailing cockpit foot well
    18. Oarlock
    19. Second part of oarlock
    20. Stern light
    21. Safety line attaching rudder to boat
    22. Oars used for rowing or to wing out twin genoas for self-steering with following wind
    23. Oarlock fixture at stern
    24. Lazarette hatch
    25. Removable "box" designed to reduce size of cockpit foot well; flotation material in aft portion and storage space under hinged lid in forward position
    26. Swivel at end of boom to which topping lift is attached
    27. Reefing cringle
    28. Reef point
    29. Boom and mast crutch
    30. Waterproof electrical socket for attaching cover
    31. Fixtures for securing cabin hatch cover
    32. Cabin dome light
    33. Winch and line for raising daggerboard-keel
    34. Fixture on which rod that holds daggerboard-keel in raised position rests
    35. Cleats for jib and mainsheet halyards
    36. Slot through which daggerboard-keel is raised or lowered
    37. Rack for charts and other papers
    38. Raised rub rail providing handhold for anyone in water
    Last edited by Sea Dreams; 08-13-2014 at 01:32 PM.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Last couple pictures (I think).

    First one is a fuzzy picture that shows the location of the bilge pump.


    Full Size.

    This second one shows the chainplate.


    Full size.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    I just can't get this boat out of my head. Searching online I found The Voyage of Southern Cross (A blog by Howard Rice) and noticed a picture.



    Here's his description of that picture:

    Southern Cross, my sailing canoe Sylph and the only other authentic Tinkerbelle (Manry's boat) in existence. My "Tinker Bell" is an exact "Tinkerbelle" built from a mid fifties Old Town White Cap dinghy and detailed exactly as Manry's boat.

    In this photo she is under construction (rebuild) and I have a plan for a voyage aboard her in the near future. I feel very fortunate to have Tinker Bell and look forward to experiencing Tinkerbelle as Manry did. His boat is gladly/sadly in a museum and her sailing characteristics are unknown to all but him and he left us long ago. This boat is a very exciting project for me and I can hardly wait to get her in the water.
    This looks like what I have been wanting to do for years now. Hopefully Howard continues to post updates to his blog about the Tinkerbelle build and any future voyages he makes in it.

    I have the magazine plans for a Tinkerbelle like copy but it looks like this one is going to be a real replica and not just something that looks like the original boat.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    6,145

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Neat!

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    51,989

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Great thread, thanks a lot.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pohnpei, Micronesia and Michigan, USA
    Posts
    772

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    IMG_1975.jpgIMG_1920 2.jpgNews
    I have just lead a four person research and measurement team from SEAS in Sheboygan Wisconsin to completely measure Tinkerbelle inside and out from stem to stern. Many thanks to the Crawford Museum and Curator Eric Rivet for allowing this to happen. Tinkerbelle mysteries solved. I will try to post more photos here if folks might be interested. This was an amazing experience. Our data will now be interpreted, committed to paper for the finish of the Tinkerbelle sister ship at SEAS and to present to the Museum for their archives.IMG_1921 2.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Howard Rice; 09-28-2018 at 06:29 PM.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    765

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    IMG_1975.jpgIMG_1920 2.jpgNews
    I have just lead a four person research and measurement team from SEAS in Sheboygan Wisconsin to completely measure Tinkerbelle inside and out from stem to stern. Many thanks to the Crawford Museum and Curator Eric Rivet for allowing this to happen. Tinkerbelle mysteries solved. I will try to post more photos here if folks might be interested. This was an amazing experience. Our data will now be interpreted, committed to paper for the finish of the Tinkerbelle sister ship at SEAS and to present to the Museum for their archives.IMG_1921 2.jpg
    I'm still very interested in Tinkerbelle and would love to see the pictures and other information you were able to collect on this boat.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    3,106

    Default Re: Tinkerbelle at the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection museum

    Funny this came alive again... But this was just posted on Facebook.. seems only fitting for someone dreaming of reproducing the dream.. or at least having the same Old Town boat.





    https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/boa/d/old-town-wooden-sailboat-sloop/6705061016.html

    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •