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Thread: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

  1. #1
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    Default Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    .
    Louisville, KY is 75 miles away from Perryville, KY where The Battle of Perryville was fought in 1862.

    But I live in the Louisville, KY eastern suburb of Middletown, KY only about 1 1/2 miles from the site of the Chenoweth Massacre of 1789. The Fort-Springhouse allegedly still stands. No telling if that is actually so, however, since the site is denied access to the general public despite being listed on the National Register of Historical Places. The property is on land owned by an operating quarry company.
    Last edited by Tom Montgomery; 02-21-2020 at 06:12 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Only if you count the Battle of Seven Oaks. Our war on mosquitoes has been pretty serious some past summers, though.

    What are you doing about it?




  3. #3
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    "para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien también" (for everything bad, mezcal, and for everything good, as well.)

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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Do you count it if the British sailed in and bombed your city? ‘Cause then I do.

    October 18, 1775

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_of_Falmouth

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    ^
    That would count.
    "Trump's authoritarianism is a feature, not a bug." -- Sky Blue

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    As a kid I lived in a remodeled barn. It had been the barn for the house next door - where British generals stayed during the battle of Ridgefield, CT.

    Lake Champlain (right nearby) was the site of battles during the French & Indian wars, as well as quite a few in the Revolutionary war.

    And... I'm 25 miles from St. Albans, VT - where the Confederates staged a raid during the Civil War. BTW - how does one have a "civil" war? That's always bothered me...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I live 7 miles from Fish Wars Bridge.

    https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/...-wars-tactics/
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I live near two, both naval

    The battle of Turtle Gut, one of the US Navy's first victories and the Battle of Chestnut Neck, a bombardment by the British on a privateering town. I actually keep my boat within walking distance of that Battle.

    http://www.sitesofnj.com/New_Jersey/...Gut_Inlet.html

    https://www.njpinebarrens.com/the-ba...chestnut-neck/
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I'm sitting about 12 miles away from Wilson's Creek National Battlefield. Went there with my family a couple of weekends back, helping my daughter with a school project. Another friend and I visited Pea Ridge National Battlefield a couple of weekends before that and hiked a 7 mile loop trail around the battlefield. Pretty sure there was also a battle in Carthage, Missouri, about an hour west of me. I'm in Springfield, MO.

    Trevor

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    My village, North Scale was the site of a skirmish in the Civil War of 1644 which ended with all but two houses being burned to the ground.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    The Sitka National Historic Park is just a few miles from our house...

    https://www.nps.gov/sitk/learn/histo...battle1804.htm

    The park was created in 1910 to commemorate the Battle of 1804 between the Tlingits and Russians. Nothing remains of the Tlingit fort other than a commemorative plaque in an open field, but there’s a ranger-led walk that focuses on the battle. The National Park Service offers two other guided walks, one focusing on the park’s totem poles and the other on the area’s natural history.
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    .
    I was raised in Vermilion, Ohio which is only about 28 miles as the crow flies from where the Battle of Lake Erie was fought on 10 September 1813.

    Commodore Perry: "Don't Give Up The Ship."

    Casualties as well as veterans of that War of 1812 are buried in cemetaries around my hometown along with some veterans of the Revolutionary War.
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I work in downtown Seattle, site of a one day battle in 1856.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Seattle_(1856)
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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I grew up in Maryland and went to graduate school in Williamsburg. The Civil War was everywhere around me. Williamsburg is near Yorktown, a major moment in the Revolutionary War. My drive between home and school took me past some of the most famous homes from the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Every few years I would go to Gettysburg and walk the battlefield. There are very few experiences that compare to walking Picket's Charge. It's moving stuff.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I used to live quite close to the site of the first Bowling Green Massacre.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Yes. A few miles from where I live, in 1649, the Haudenosaunee eradicated the Wendat.

    Hard on them. Fortunate for me.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith
    I grew up in Maryland and went to graduate school in Williamsburg. The Civil War was everywhere around me. Williamsburg is near Yorktown, a major moment in the Revolutionary War. My drive between home and school took me past some of the most famous homes from the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Every few years I would go to Gettysburg and walk the battlefield. There are very few experiences that compare to walking Picket's Charge. It's moving stuff.
    8th graders in my middle school took a trip to the Gettysburg battlefield and then on to Washington, D.C. So it has been some 51 years since I visited Gettysburg. I have a clearer memory of Washington D.C.: the Capital, the Washington Monument, the FBI building (a machine gun shoot!), and the Smithsonian Institution.

    As an adult I have toured the Antietam (Sharpsburg for you Confederates) battlefield twice. A lot of that battlefield is still in private hands and farmed. Which makes it feel that much more immediate.
    "Trump's authoritarianism is a feature, not a bug." -- Sky Blue

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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Battle of Skull Mound.date uncertain,but after 1649
    Ojibway(Anishnabe) crushed Iroquois(Haudenosaunee)
    See Hadfield above
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Oyster Wars.

    And

    The Battle of St Michaels

    Both just about outside my doorstep.

    Edit to add: Antietam is an impressive site, the open farmland giving sense of the vast breadth of the battle.
    Last edited by SMARTINSEN; 02-21-2020 at 07:56 PM.
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I live near fort Stevens, a Japanese sub shelled the area and the soldiers hid in the bunkers and did not fire back..

    No , not cowards, they did not want to give the position away.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I'm only a couple miles from Camp Randall, a civil war prison, though the majority of the massacres there have been at the hands of Ohio State.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby of Tulsa View Post
    My 3?G uncle, Ben McCulloch, was killed at Pea Ridge.

    My hometown where I am near now.
    The town was destroyed during the Union Army's actions related to the siege of Vicksburg. Troops from a Union gunboat landed at Greenville. In retaliation for being fired upon, they burned every building. The inhabitants took refuge in plantation homes of the area. When the war ended, veterans of Mississippi regiments returned to find Greenville in a state of ruin. The former residents soon decided to build again. They chose a new site three miles away, at the highest point on the east side of the Mississippi River between the towns of Vicksburg and Memphis.
    There is no marker showing were the town used to be and the site could be covered by the Mississippi River now.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    I should also have mentioned Antietam. Once you've seen the old photographs of the sunken road with all the bodies and then you stand there, it changes you. You see that narrow bridge and imagine troops pouring across under fire, I cannot imagine how they followed their orders.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    As an adult I have toured the Antietam (Sharpsburg for you Confederates) battlefield twice. A lot of that battlefield is still in private hands and farmed. Which makes it feel that much more immediate.
    I should also have mentioned Antietam. Once you've seen the old photographs of the sunken road with all the bodies and then you stand there, it changes you. You see that narrow bridge and imagine troops pouring across under fire, I cannot imagine how they followed their orders.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    .
    I was raised in Vermilion, Ohio which is about 25 miles as the crow flies from Johnson's Island in Sandusky Bay (just off the present Cedar Point Amusement Park). It was a prison that imprisoned mostly Confederate officers. Some 200 died and are buried there.

    In late 1861, Federal officials selected Johnson's Island as the site for a prisoner of war camp to hold up to 2,500 captured Confederate officers. The island offered easy access by ship for supplies to construct and maintain a prison and its population. Sandusky Bay offered more protection from the elements than on other nearby islands, which were also closer to Canada in the event of a prison break. Woods of hickory and oak trees could provide lumber and fuel. The U.S. government leased half the island from private owner Leonard B. Johnson for $500 a year, and for the duration of the war carefully controlled access to the island.

    The 16.5-acre (6.7 ha) prison opened in April 1862. A 15-foot-high (5 m) wooden stockade surrounded 12 two-story prisoner housing barracks, a hospital, latrines, sutler’s stand, three wells, a pest house, and two large mess halls (added in August 1864). More than 40 buildings stood outside the prison walls, including barns, stables, a limekiln, forts, barracks for officers, and a powder magazine. They were used by the 128th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which guarded the prison. The prisoners had a lively community, with amateur theatrical performances, publishing, and crafts projects available.

    After the unraveling of a Confederate espionage ring which had been plotting the seizure of the Great Lakes warship USS Michigan and a mass breakout of prisoners, Forts Johnson and Hill were constructed over the winter of 1864–65. They were not operational until March 1865, in the war's final months, when the prisoner population peaked at 3,200.

    More than 15,000 men passed through Johnson's Island until it was closed in September 1865. About 200 prisoners died as a result of the harsh Ohio winters, food and fuel shortages, and disease. Johnson's Island had one of the lowest mortality rates of any Civil War prison. Confederates made many escape attempts, including efforts by some to walk across the frozen Lake Erie to freedom in Canada, but only a handful of escapes were successful.

    Among the prominent Confederate generals imprisoned on Johnson's Island were Isaac R. Trimble and James J. Archer (both captured at the Battle of Gettysburg), William Beall, Thomas Benton Smith, Edward "Allegheny" Johnson and Missouri cavalrymen M. Jeff Thompson and John S. Marmaduke, William Lewis Cabell later Mayor of Dallas and Lieutenant Christopher Columbus Nash, later the sheriff of Grant Parish, Louisiana, who directed the Colfax riot in 1873, was also imprisoned at Johnson's Island.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnson%27s_Island
    Last edited by Tom Montgomery; 02-21-2020 at 08:45 PM.
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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    The nearest one with a historical marker.

    The Battle of Old River Lake (also called Ditch Bayou, Furlough, and Fish Bayou) was a small skirmish between U.S. Army troops and Confederate troops from June 5 to June 6, 1864, during the American Civil War. A Union Army force marched into Confederate-held lands in Chicot County, Arkansas. The ensuing battle resulted mainly in a stalemate, each side achieving its goals. The Confederate troops succeeded in delaying the Federal forces' advance into the South, while dealing more casualties to the opposing army than they themselves received. Likewise, the Union troops succeeded in advancing toward their goal, Lake Village.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith
    I should also have mentioned Antietam. Once you've seen the old photographs of the sunken road with all the bodies and then you stand there, it changes you. You see that narrow bridge and imagine troops pouring across under fire, I cannot imagine how they followed their orders.
    ^
    This.

    Unimaginable. Stomach turning to contemplate.

    Yet soldiers about 55 years later in WWI followed the same type of orders, went over the top out of the safety of their trenches, and died in the machine gun and artillery fire.
    "Trump's authoritarianism is a feature, not a bug." -- Sky Blue

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  28. #28
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    As a kid I lived on a War of 1812 battlefield. Somewhere I have what I think is a piece of grapeshot or canister shot that we dug up one day in the garden.
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  29. #29
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    My childhood stomping grounds were within a slingshot round of the Defence, one the scuttled/sunk ships of the ill fated Penobscot Expedition. The worst naval disaster in US history until Pearl Harbor 160 years later, Paul Revere was court martialed for cowardice.

    My grandfather told tales of swimming and diving off the quarter deck at low tide (but it could have been his fathers tale!)

    There were other wrecks from the Revolutionary war scattered up the River from Stockton Springs to Brewer, and as a boy I spent many summer days endlessly wandering that tideline for miles hoping to find some relic but of course never did. Those beaches were picked over 150 years before I got there! But if only to keep me occupied it was encouraged behavior, almost every cove had an an abandoned vessel on the beach which was great fun.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penobscot_Expedition

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peno...xpedition_Site

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    My grandfather worked for the US Corps of Engineers and was involved with raising the USS Cairo. These came from there.

    cairo.jpg

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Battle of Skull Mound.date uncertain,but after 1649
    Ojibway(Anishnabe) crushed Iroquois(Haudenosaunee)
    See Hadfield above
    R
    Denonville, a swine.



  32. #32
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    Quote Originally Posted by TomF
    As a kid I lived on a War of 1812 battlefield. Somewhere I have what I think is a piece of grapeshot or canister shot that we dug up one day in the garden.
    My grandfather had a dresser drawer with flint arrowheads that he had turned up while cultivating his fields in northern Ohio. Old hunting grounds. Or possibly old battle grounds.

    Lake Erie is named after the Erie (Cat) Native American tribe that lived along the southern shore and was utterly wiped out by the Iroquois League in 1654. European influence predominated as the Erie people were disadvantaged in armed conflict with the Iroquois because they had few firearms.
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  33. #33
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    After being driven from his ancestral lands in western Washington, Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce surrendered 40 miles short of the safety of Sitting Bull and the Canadian border. They had conducted a fighting retreat over 1600 miles and across the continental divide with their families.

    When it was over no one had won. The Nez Perce had started with about 750 people, one third of which were warriors. 122 of them had been killed and 93 wounded. About 200, half warriors and half younger women and older children, escaped through General Mile’s lines and made their way to refuge with Sitting Bull in Canada.

    The U.S. Army lost 177 killed and 147 wounded. About 50 of those killed had been civilian volunteers. After the initial incident that started the retreat the Nez Perce had been unusually civil in their dealings with whites encountered along the trail that were not part of the force hunting them and most had been either ignored or let go unharmed after a couple of days.

    The surrendered tribe was promised by General Miles that they would be returned to their native lands but it never happened. They were shipped first to Fort Keogh and then to Indian territory. Years later they were relocated again to the Colville area in Washington. Joseph died there in the early 1900’s, still pleading with the government to let his people go back to the land they never gave up.

    The Army commanders did no better. The chase had been too long and too bungled for there to be much glory and Generals Howard and Miles promptly began a public fight over what little there was. Perhaps the best summation can be found in the U.S. Army R.O.T.C. manual where it states “in 11 weeks he (Joseph) had moved his tribe 1,600 miles, engaged 10 separate U.S. commands in 13 battles and skirmishes, and in nearly every instance either defeated them or fought them to a standstill”.

    A remarkable testament to human courage and endurance.


    "I
    am tired of fighting. Our chiefs are killed. Looking Glass is dead. Too-hool-holl-zote is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say, 'Yes' or 'No.' He who led the young men (Olikut) is dead. It is cold, and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are — perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever."
    Last edited by Tom Montgomery; 02-21-2020 at 10:26 PM.
    "Trump's authoritarianism is a feature, not a bug." -- Sky Blue

    "Don't worry you will have a second chance to vote for Trump and be able to raise your heads high again. But no third chances unless the loophole is acted upon and Trump runs again in 2024." -- Soo-Valley






  34. #34
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    By the time I was 16 we had moved south to Fairfax, Va. which was then essentially undeveloped. All rural countryside, I used to ride dirt bikes all through old battlefields and abandoned farms, drag race at Manassas, and go fishing in Bull Run.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Do you live near an historic battlefield?

    There are still loads of places around here where you can still see the earthworks. My office is just a mile outside the outer defense line of the city.
    Skip

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