Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 123 ... LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 114

Thread: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Finally, lots of thought and solutions to which rig to use for Artemis. Axel had already tested both the Bermudan and Bufflehead rigs. He has now built another solution which may be popular and will be the lowest cost, but very nice, solution.

    Three rigs will available.

    Lug Rug. Spars made by builder. Sail sewn from a SailRite kit. Axel found that SailRite had a mainsail from Iain Oughtred's MacGregor sailing canoe available as a standard off the shelf kit for $190, so he ordered one and has now sewn the sail. Too cold to test yet. This will be a very good looking rig, very practical and will suit Artemis.

    Bermudan, roller reefing around the mast. Axel is developing a three piece carbon mast to go with a Bermudan sail. The roll around the mast reefing will give a very easy to reef rig. Sail from Solway Dory in Europe or perhaps a kit or even an RSS sail from Michael Storer. I am also experimenting with a fathead style similar to the Hobie Adventure sail which is 5m and fits on a two piece windsurfer carbon mast.

    Final option will be the highest performance level. This will use a three piece carbon mast from Axel and the lovely Bufflehead sail from Dobbler Sails that the Gougeon brothers, and Hugh (not Howard see next post) developed for Bufflehead.

    All very exciting.

    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 01-18-2015 at 04:56 PM.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Thanks, Brian!
    Yes, I am quite happy with the progress so far.
    I have to add that Hugh's original seat is featured here: http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/hugh/h_essay9_en.htm
    If you live in the US, Ron Sell is suppling beautiful carbon masts, too. He and his boat are featured here: http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/hugh/h_essay10_en.htm
    Dabbler Sails can be found here: http://www.dabblersails.com/
    Howard's rig and sails are a somewhat different breed from the ones that Hugh and the Gougeon brothers developed.
    Axel
    Last edited by canoe_sailor; 01-18-2015 at 12:42 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Hobart, Tasmania
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Has anybody built the Paul Fisher - Arctic Skua yawl rigged sailing canoe. Looks like an interesting new design to me.http://www.makeacanoe.com/sailingcanoes.htm#ARTIC
    It would be interesting to here opinions on this design.
    John

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,502

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    I kind of like that one. The only thing that strikes me as a bit strange right off the bat is the steer stick overlapping the mizzen mast. When tacking and jibing small boats I just like the tiller to be free and accessible from any strange position I happen to find myself in. It probably wouldn't be that difficult to modify.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    I missed her when looking at their sailing canoe only last week. She very nice. At 14' and only 24kg a very handy boat indeed. Good looking, the cockpit side position for the pivoting centreboard is a good solution, in fact probably the best available.

    The tiller does look odd. Have dropped them a line to ask about that.

    The mainsail boom sets low on the mast, so hopefully as it rises it will clear a sitting sailor.

    Great to have a new choice of lightweight classic looking but up to date sailing canoe available.



    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 02-03-2015 at 03:45 AM.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pohnpei, Micronesia and Michigan, USA
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Here is a photo of one of Sylph's spars (she has two). This is an internal halyard, ovoid shape with luff groove made of carbon fiber that weighs in at just about 4 pounds. These two spars were labor intensive to build but very much worth the effort. Sylph can be sailed in a number of rig configurations ranging from yawl to cat. I usually sail her as a sloop.


    G]

    I am building a new canoe from one of the the first four Bufflehead hulls and she will be rigged the same as Sylph (three mast steps) and will also feature side decks and a single offset centerboard allowing me to sleep in the middle of the canoe. The other evasion for the offset board is to get away from the surface piercing leeboard, which is not a very clean approach, too much drag and vulnerable to side force damage. I test sailed an Aquamuse in Japan and confirmed my desire for an easy righting and re-entry set up hence the side decks. The board is to starboard and the side longitudinal forms the outboard side of the centerboard trunk. The board goes in from the deck and is easily removable with a squeeze button friction fit. The board is hand operated via the use of a dual position (actually infinite) adjustment horn design.

    My new canoe is an evolution of Sylph, which I consider a capable cruising sailing canoe. I hope to have her done this coming summer in spite of having another new boat about ready for sea trials.
    Last edited by Howard Rice; 02-03-2015 at 03:44 PM.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,936

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    I kind of like that one. The only thing that strikes me as a bit strange right off the bat is the steer stick overlapping the mizzen mast. When tacking and jibing small boats I just like the tiller to be free and accessible from any strange position I happen to find myself in. It probably wouldn't be that difficult to modify.
    --- My mizzen similarly overlaps with the push-pull pole but I have not found it a problem, and I move everywhere on my canoe because I can (a deep-hulled outrigger that allows much free movement -- but this free movement negates many problems one would have reaching or handing over a push-pull-pole, I suppose). Another perhaps minor reason is that my pole is longer than it needs to be, so I can be sitting to windward (ie, butt hanging over the rail or on side seat) and still be steering the boat on the tack where the pole is against the mizzen. The ultimate solution, though not elegant, is a twin-pole system. Rice's canoe and perhaps Bufflehead uses that? -- Wade

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,936

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Cool canoe seat. I am curious about seat shapes and mean to experiment. Does anybody use a shallow-U shaped seat? Seems that a U, with the upturned edges against the sides of the hull, might let you lean to windward a little on a beat and get a little support from the leeward side of the sloping seat. OTOH, I can imagine the outer edges compressing your outer thighs annoyingly when the seat is level. I tried an air-cushion during the Texas 200 in a 'duck, where 95% of 5 days involved sitting crouched on the WW airtank, and it was very comfortable, but shifted so much underneath me that I was nearly tossed overboard a couple of times -- I won't use such a thing again, i don't think. -- Wade

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pohnpei, Micronesia and Michigan, USA
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Hi Wade
    I do use a dual tiller arrangement and consider it a good solution as it allows me to:

    1. Have easy instant access to the tiller on either board, I always know where the tiller is. I never have to reach or look or worry about a single tiller when tacking in big air. In fact I have non skid spots adjacent to the tiller sticks on each side of the canoe. The locations of these are more or less imprinted in my brain and as I tack and am handling sails my palms (hands) go to these exact spots and the tiller is there, very automatic.

    2. Self steering. I have developed a system, which allows self steering while I navigate, rest, have something to eat etc. The system relies on the opposing pressure from two tillers.

    3. I can quickly disengage either tiller for single tiller steering. At times I stand while navigating shallows or cuts and standing is important.

    4. I use an integrated dual tiller/foot steering system utilizing BMW motorcycle (sheathed) cables linked into the rudder yoke. I often steer hiked out with one foot on a pedal and one hand on a tiller, back and forth allowing very finite control and the ability to use hands for trimming, going back to the tiller. For example when I steer with the tiller my foot pedals are moving as I steer, integration.

    5. I have never had an issue with the dual sticks while rigged as a yawl.

    I can post photos of there is any interest.


    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    --- My mizzen similarly overlaps with the push-pull pole but I have not found it a problem, and I move everywhere on my canoe because I can (a deep-hulled outrigger that allows much free movement -- but this free movement negates many problems one would have reaching or handing over a push-pull-pole, I suppose). Another perhaps minor reason is that my pole is longer than it needs to be, so I can be sitting to windward (ie, butt hanging over the rail or on side seat) and still be steering the boat on the tack where the pole is against the mizzen. The ultimate solution, though not elegant, is a twin-pole system. Rice's canoe and perhaps Bufflehead uses that? -- Wade

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Thanks for that Howard. Used to notice that the U.S. practice was to use two tillers and the UK practice is just a single tiller, and wondered why.

    had a single tiller on all my sailing canoes so far, but still never quite got used to it. After each tack I would have to do a little steering check to see which way luffed and which bore away. Seemed odd that I could not get used to it, but then recently thought it through.

    Most of us learn to sail with a normal rudder and we get used to pushing the tiller away on either tack to luff/tack and pulling the rudder to bear away/gybe. Same on both tacks.

    Now, try sailing with just one tiller on a push/pull system. The tiller is fixed to the port side of the yoke. Sit facing forward, tiller coming alongside left of body, held in left hand. Sailing on port tack, you pull to luff/tack, and push back to bear away/gybe. Now tack. Sitting in same position, tiller in same hand, sailing on starboard. If you pull you bear away/gybe and if you push back you luff /tack. Just the opposite result on each tack. It gets worse if you are sailing out on the gunnel and swapping hands.

    So, I realised why I got confused. Now if you use two tillers for the good reasons Howard lists, use also go back to the same action producing the same results.

    Hope above makes sense to readers.

    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 02-04-2015 at 06:51 AM.

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,807

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    I had the same issues as Brian, though im sure if you spent much time afloat it would become second nature eventually. Im still working details for Michalaks sailing canoe "Petes Boat", who had his set up for foot steering, im also interested in a hands on system. Would be interested to see pics of your cable system Howard as i have been thinking along similar lines. I note your comment on surface piercing foils and too much drag.....is it really noticable? I certainly understand the possible damage situation.
    I like Pauls new canoe design, that a whole lot lighter than "Petes boat".

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Sail area of Skua is 42 sq ft main and 16 sq ft mizzen. Some OCSG members feel it's a little oversize for the beam. Would be straight forward to draw slightly smaller rig with a total of 44 sq ft to meet OCSG racing size.

    They also felt the 30" beam a little too narrow for the sail area. Paul has said a builder has already asked for a wider beam version and he has agreed to draw it.

    Brian

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,502

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Reminds me of when my Mini 12 Meter and iceboat both had foot pedal steering - only they were set up to work oppositely. After sailing the twelve all summer, getting in the iceboat and tearing across the lake got really exciting at times with a very high "oops factor".

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Pretty scary at iceboat speeds. I am probably only doing 3 knots and worrying!

    Would love to know what beam and sail area you Todd, and everyone else here, would choose for this single person sailing canoe?

    I think probably 14 sq ft mizzen, 40 sq ft main, so close to a compromise 5 sq m. Beam for me, having been used to 36" hull beam, ie not counting gunnels, choice would be 35/36" if she still looks sweet.

    Brian

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,807

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    At what point does beam width with a double paddle become a hassle? I note the original Petes boat at 36in beam was used a single paddle. I did see that Oughtred McGregor is only 31in and a Millcreek 13 is 29in; both use a double paddle. I did see most of Fishers other sailing canoes were around the 36in. Did Paul say how wide the version of Skua is that he is drawing up?

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Axel has concentrated very much on producing a 50/50 sailing canoe, he wants to double paddle with kayaking friends in the winter. Artemis is 30.5" at the the moment. He reports that he is very happy with her sailing performance. So I think that must be the switch over point. Guess that is why the Skua is 30" as the first builder wanted to kayak paddle.

    I found the MacGregor very unstable downwind, she gave me a pasting. The Solway Dory canoes are in another world of ease of sailing and feeling secure.

    Paul did not say, perhaps not finalised yet, see how she looks as he widens her.

    Will try and post a pic of Hugh Horton kayak paddling Bufflehead two up. She is 33" wide I think. Axel does kayak paddle Bufflehead but finds Artemis much better for a long paddle.

    Brian

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    Would love to know what beam and sail area you Todd, and everyone else here, would choose for this single person sailing canoe?
    I have several single person sailing canoes but they are quite different from the ones described here. The largest is about 44 inches wide with sponsons and 100 square feet of sail. I also have other versions of this canoe without sponsons that are closer to 37 inches wide. These can be rigged with one or two lateen sails so the smallest sail size option is 40 square feet. Some pictures are attached below.

    Benson







    Last edited by Benson Gray; 02-04-2015 at 12:42 PM.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560


  19. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,936

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    ... 4. I use an integrated dual tiller/foot steering system utilizing BMW motorcycle (sheathed) cables linked into the rudder yoke. I often steer hiked out with one foot on a pedal and one hand on a tiller, back and forth allowing very finite control and the ability to use hands for trimming, going back to the tiller. For example when I steer with the tiller my foot pedals are moving as I steer, integration....
    --- Bike cables -- that's interesting. The thing that I worry about with dual poles is a brain glitch. I have a singe pole that I got used to after a couple of short cruises, beginning with a capsize when I pushed instead of pulled -- in a pinch would my brain adequately map out two poles? Geez, I don't know! :-) -- Wade

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,807

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    Axel has concentrated very much on producing a 50/50 sailing canoe, he wants to double paddle with kayaking friends in the winter. Artemis is 30.5" at the the moment. He reports that he is very happy with her sailing performance. So I think that must be the switch over point. Guess that is why the Skua is 30" as the first builder wanted to kayak paddle.

    I found the MacGregor very unstable downwind, she gave me a pasting. The Solway Dory canoes are in another world of ease of sailing and feeling secure.

    Paul did not say, perhaps not finalised yet, see how she looks as he widens her.

    Will try and post a pic of Hugh Horton kayak paddling Bufflehead two up. She is 33" wide I think. Axel does kayak paddle Bufflehead but finds Artemis much better for a long paddle.

    Brian
    Surely bottom shape has as much do to with stabilty than the few inches of beam we are talking about. I remember my first time in a glass white-water canoe, having just got out an old canvas on frame type and i found it impossible to stay upright, admittedly my first canoe experience but a sure eye opener concerning shape and stability. Could the fewer
    planks of the Skua make her a much (relatively) stiffer canoe than the McGregor?

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    44,346

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    I can attest that bottom shape does make a difference. My Macgregor is basically a half tube and requires ballast to help stability as it is very tender, and you have to be quick to catch it in a fickle breeze.. My old plastic flat bottomed sea kayak is in many ways easier to sail.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Yes, agree bottom shape matters greatly. Artemis has a wide plank bottom and then 3 plank sides to make her as stable as possible with her 30.5" beam. With me being used to 36" beam with a stable hull shape I did worry if Artemis might be too tender for me but Axel is reporting good sailing performance and that she is quick as well. Obviously same bottom at 40" beam would make her more stable, but harder to double paddle and slower.

    Brian

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Yes, Brian, everything you mention is very important.
    - I feel my 50:50-width is 30 1/2", and I am long and tall. If you think another 50:50-width would suit you and the conditions of wind/waves etc. in your area better, Artemis can be easily built 2" wider or narrower without problems.
    - I try to get as much form stability out of the hull as possible, so I have drawn a wide flat bottom. Using four instead of five planks per side gave the additional benefit that this shape can be built in stitch-and-glue fashion. No mold with full stringers needed.
    - I have optimized the rocker for an overall sailing weight of 160 kg (which is fine for solo cruising with some light camping gear). The unexpected surprise was that she is easily driven and tracking nice for tandem paddling, even with two heavier guys and 20 kg of additional luggage.
    - I also reduced the prismatic coefficient of bow and stern, and have optimised entry and exit angles. This results in less wave resistance, so she is somewhat faster under double paddle. This also results in less reserve buoyancy in the ends, so she will be slightly wetter in big waves than Bufflehead.
    Please notice that Bufflehead is able to semi-plane (extend hull speed, which is unusual for a canoe), and the Artemis rear section was drawn to give good stability under these conditions.

    The wide and the narrow sailing canoes are preferred under different conditions. Since more than 100 years, "american" and "english" sailing canoes differ in shape, weight, freeboard and width. Just compare Artemis and Nautilus. You would prefer the american ones with less beam to be fast in calm conditions, and you will prefer the english ones in high wind and waves, because they will take less water and have more form stability. Just decide what you will do with them and then make your choice.

    Axel
    Last edited by canoe_sailor; 02-10-2015 at 12:56 PM.

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Axel has been writing build instructions for Artemis for,and with,his first kit customer. They are very extensive and fully detailed. Currently they are in German, links are on Axels's german language pages as downloadable PDF files.

    http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/bausatz.htm

    Realising that Google Translate with work with PDF's, something I never knew, I tried a translation of the first document and it worked. After a few iterations between us to improve on Google Translate's efforts, we have a working document which you might like to have a look over.

    It it explains why Artemis was developed, and describes the features which are included in Artemis to make her meet her design goals. Link below,

    http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/00_ARTE...intro_v0.1.pdf

    Brian

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Axel now built a new Artemis hull and has the new plywood deck ready to fit, so before doing so, he has taken some pictures to illustrate how she can carry aboard all that is needed, and how sleeping aboard is possible.




  26. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,936

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Nice canoe design, but I am curious that the sleeping arrangement above (I am assuming this is at anchor -- stop reading here if the assumption is that the canoe is dragged ashore....) does not show where the sleeping bag storage bottle and the shore clothes bag and the trolley are stowed when the body is taking up their space. The first time I slept aboard my 22 inch wide outrigger canoe hull, I was surprised how complex it was going to sleep -- and that was on a stable platform! As I dug my sleeping stuff out of the big storage compartment, I was faced with the problem of where I put stuff during arrangement -- the PFD, the dry suit, the big Pelican day-box, the wet-store-bag -- all of sudden it was a a big shuffling game that taught me how important all these "trivial" factors are in sleeping aboard a canoe. -- Wade

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Very true, Wade. My approach is somewhat different from Howard, who likes to sleep in his sailing canoe Sylph on the water. I generally unload the boat, then take her on my shoulder and walk her onto the shore (this is the reason why she must be light), and sleep on dry land. I usually erect a tarp (this is an occasion where it helps to have some carbon mast segments at hand) and stow the luggage between the canoe and the tarp.
    Here is my setup with the tarp:



    My friend Enno has a clever tunnel tent for his beautiful sailing canoe stripper, Eisvogel:

    Think I will make a simpler version of that for Artemis in summer.

    Axel
    Last edited by canoe_sailor; 03-25-2015 at 12:39 AM.

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,936

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    OK, thanks, mystery solved! :-) Sleeping on land in the canoe has its benefits (a bit more wildlife and dampness resistant than a tent?) -- Wade

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Axel has been working hard and making excellent progress on Artemis.

    One area is the new llightweight construction plywood deck and the other is writing the build manual and translating into English. The first seven days of the build, completing the glassed hull, are now translated and available for free download for anyone to download and read, to study and contemplate. These methods, and how to recover when things go wrong, create a lightweight structure which ensures the sailing canoe really can be carried by the helmsman/woman who goes adventuring in her.

    http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/download_en.htm

    Axel has just launched the new boat this weekend and reports she paddles under double oar at between 6 and 7 kph.

    He says" Clear lines, lovely boat, I am quite happy!"

    She should be sailing in a few weeks time.








  30. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,807

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Amazing how some subtle differences between canoes/kayaks can really make some stand out. It looks both classic and modern if thats possible. Nice job Axel!

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North East England
    Posts
    636

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    There is fitting in the side of the hull that looks like a pump exhaust, is this wat it is or a fancy leeboard attachment?

    Tink

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    It is, indeed, the leeboard mounting. A glass tube with close fit to the aluminium tube glued into the leeboard. Add a friction mechanism, some re-inforcement inside the hull and the whole thing has to be watertight even with no leeboard fitted.
    Have used a comparable mechanism on my Bufflehead for some years quite successfully. Development of such mounting devices goes back to Hugh Horton, the Gougeons and Howard Rice.
    http://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/hugh/h_essay3_en.htm
    (scroll down)

    Axel

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Amazing how some subtle differences between canoes/kayaks can really make some stand out. It looks both classic and modern if thats possible. Nice job Axel!
    Well said, just what my thoughts were, your words so nicely express, classic and modern.

    Brian

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    I think Brian mentioned "purposeful lines" in a recent mail. Thanks for that nice comment, scaraborgcraft.

    Axel

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: New Wooden Sailing Canoes - Artemis, Nautilus and TriRaid 560

    Canoe sailing is in a very healthy state just now in the UK. This video by Chris Wheeler is from the Spring Scottish meet last weekend. Thanks for sharing Chris.



    Brian

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •