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Thread: How cars have changed/improved over the years

  1. #71
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    What would constitute a "non warranty repair"?
    Accident, abuse, normal replacement (brakes, tires, etc.).

  2. #72
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by John Smith View Post
    On the other thread I got into windshield wiper improvements; wiping more of the windshield, interval wiping, and such. I think that was a great improvement.

    They don't rust out so quickly is another improvement.

    Power windows are nice.
    I tend to buy bare bones used cars.

    But my grandkid wanted something nice. So many nice features.

    Auto windows. Window shades.

    Seat heaters. Individually reclining.

    Auto doors.

    Remote start.

    Backup camera. And some sort of warning beeper.

    Hard drive for my tunes. And 115v outlets for watching videos on computers and tablets.

    So much nicer than my house.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Like I said, I am usually at odds with people on this forum about cars. Aftermarket parts are under assault by chinese knock offs, sometimes in the same box graphics. Your independent mechanic could well be good enough to repair your expensive european car, but if he makes an error, or you happen to get one of those nasty knockoff parts, well, it's on you. The dealer is responsible for his service, liable in a greater sense. I know lots of independent mechanics, and some of them are very very good, but some of them are hacks too. I suppose that happens in dealerships too, but in my experience those techs don't last very long. The dealership I work at just got a new tire balancer and a tire changing machine: $20,000 dollars for the two pieces. They have the ability to change and balance the larger rims and tires common in the industry..... and we're just a little small town dealership. The number of times I have seen Joe's garage misdiagnose and spend money on that misdiagnosis is just too high to count. If you think that dealer labour rates are all about the building and so on, well, carry on.

    Usually car discussions on this forum devolve into people spouting off about how dealerships rip you off, and car salesman are crooks. At least half of the stuff said about car servicing and repair, (along with marine engine advice) is bullshiit on this forum, but that's expected for an open internet forum. I don't bother to post on engine advice or my boats here anymore. It isn't worth it.
    Peter - You have some very valid points. I think this comes down to being an educated consumer. I will ask what brand of parts are going in, or in this case, I pay him $10 an hour more & supply my own. There are horror stories aplenty in both dealers & independents: a Volvo dealer here spent $4800 of a friend's $ to finally replace a partially plugged converter & never volunteered to discount the basically complete FI system they replaced. An independent shop near me put in a new steering rack & did not get the steering column clamp onto the rack all the way - the driver lost steering @ 70mph with 5 people in the car, etc. etc. A good mechanic that you can trust is a valuable thing & hugely underrated by 99% of the population.

    My problem is that I 1) know dealer mechanics (the independent who did the TB is an ex-factory mechanic) & 2) sold parts to garages & dealers for years & 3) ran my own shop. I know the underbelly of the business & there are no perfect businesses. That being said, I've seen that smaller dealers tend to stand head & shoulders above the big volume ones. There are 2 VW dealers within 40 miles of me & the difference between them is simply astounding. Many, many people choose to drive the (for them) 50 miles to one instead of the 3 to the other. Oh - one is big & fancy & charges $95/hour. The other isn't & charges $75. Why such a difference if the building doesn't play a role?

  4. #74
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    One of the unsung aspects about modern cars is tyre technology. Even in the last 5 years or so normal street tyres have advanced massively with progressive compounds that are just as good on a worn tyre as new. When I was driving the same basic car technology in the late 70's or 80's a 400 hp car was quite a lethal thing on the street. You could expect fairly sustained loss of traction in all sorts of situations . Same / similar drivetrain on modern tyres is a completely different animal, much less likely to break loose, and thats without even counting the developments in traction control and other driver aids.
    Its much more important on Bikes of course. Modern motorcycles and the 'contact patch' they have at the angles they corner at simply wouldn't be viable if it wasn't for the advance in the tyres.

    Talking old cars again for a minute and floor switches , I had a couple of Model A's way back. In Right hand drive they have the accelerator in the middle between clutch and brake. dip switch I assume is on the floor ( I forget) but starter was a floor pedal as well. Not to mention the fuel in the cowl in front of you ( with fuel cock to hand) distributor advance and retard on a lever opposite the hand throttle ( redundant) on the steering column. And I seem to recall the pull choke also had a twist function to lean or richen the fuel mixture.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Most of the diesel hype is just that: hype. While diesel may provide better mileage than some cars, there are still gasoline engines or hybrids that perform extremely well, and the car itself costs less, and uses lower priced fuel. European diesel cars still have to be modified to run on the diesel fuel we have here. Diesel fuel on this continent ranges from 38 to perhaps as high as 44 cetane, but rarely more than 42. European and Asian diesel is 55 cetane. This is one of the reasons that new domestic diesel trucks have to have a urea tank to burn off the last of the NoX fumes in the catalytic converter for the 2016 diesel emissions standards. Diesels cost more to buy, more to maintain, and in the case of a consumer use pickup truck are unlikely to pay back the extra costs in gas mileage over the life of the truck. One of the problems, of course, is that fact that northern climates in North America use a substantive amount of salt in the wintertime reducing the life of the chassis. Buying a diesel in an arid area is a good choice simply because of it's longevity, but even that is not a huge factor anymore.

    Resale values on diesels are higher even when they shouldn't be. Wholesalers know they need to buy them right because of the work required to prepare them for sale if they are an older unit. I'm sure the BMW 328 has a nice bunch of engineering, but BMW's reliability record and subsequent maintenance costs are 30% higher than other brands, so the savings on fuel is moot. If world manufacturers of small diesels could bring their vehicles in without emission mods and so on, it would be wonderful, but that simply isn't the case. That said, with emerging emission requirements rising, Europe is already seeing a scaleback in diesel car ownership. It's about 50% at the moment, but a decline is already underway.
    When I was young my dad had a friend who bought a diesel car. I remember how pissed off he was when he realized he had to drive out to the highway to fill up.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael D. Storey View Post
    There is legislation in Maryland to fine heavily if one is involved in an accident while using their telephone except in the proscribed manner.
    I still think cars should disable cell phones for the driver's seat when the engine is running. I also think one should need a valid license to start the car. That would, IMO, be a good use of technology.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Too Little Time View Post
    I tend to buy bare bones used cars.

    But my grandkid wanted something nice. So many nice features.

    Auto windows. Window shades.

    Seat heaters. Individually reclining.

    Auto doors.

    Remote start.

    Backup camera. And some sort of warning beeper.

    Hard drive for my tunes. And 115v outlets for watching videos on computers and tablets.

    So much nicer than my house.
    I can do without some of those, but there are some cold mornings when remote start would be nice.

    I presently use a ten disc CD player mounted in the back out of sight and out of the way. I'd like, I think, to simply be able to plug an ipod in.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Most of the diesel hype is just that: hype. While diesel may provide better mileage than some cars, there are still gasoline engines or hybrids that perform extremely well, and the car itself costs less, and uses lower priced fuel. European diesel cars still have to be modified to run on the diesel fuel we have here. Diesel fuel on this continent ranges from 38 to perhaps as high as 44 cetane, but rarely more than 42. European and Asian diesel is 55 cetane. This is one of the reasons that new domestic diesel trucks have to have a urea tank to burn off the last of the NoX fumes in the catalytic converter for the 2016 diesel emissions standards. Diesels cost more to buy, more to maintain, and in the case of a consumer use pickup truck are unlikely to pay back the extra costs in gas mileage over the life of the truck. One of the problems, of course, is that fact that northern climates in North America use a substantive amount of salt in the wintertime reducing the life of the chassis. Buying a diesel in an arid area is a good choice simply because of it's longevity, but even that is not a huge factor anymore.

    Resale values on diesels are higher even when they shouldn't be. Wholesalers know they need to buy them right because of the work required to prepare them for sale if they are an older unit. I'm sure the BMW 328 has a nice bunch of engineering, but BMW's reliability record and subsequent maintenance costs are 30% higher than other brands, so the savings on fuel is moot. If world manufacturers of small diesels could bring their vehicles in without emission mods and so on, it would be wonderful, but that simply isn't the case. That said, with emerging emission requirements rising, Europe is already seeing a scaleback in diesel car ownership. It's about 50% at the moment, but a decline is already underway.

    43MPG, diesel is at parity with premium here in GA. Acquisition cost is $1500 higher for the diesel.
    Hybrids will need that batteries replaced at some point. That won't be cheap.
    I've had 5 BMW cars and 3 bikes. All have been very reliable.
    Maintenance is a moot point. Everything is covered for 4 years except tires.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  9. #79
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    I disagree with slug that one can't work on newer cars, and will fight PMJ to the death over the suggestion that selling part to civilians should be prohibited. New cars are certainly more complicated, but much of what normally goes wrong with them any reasonably careful person can fix at home. Some things you can't - tires, obviously, and suspension work requires special tools for alignment. Some you can, but it isn't worth the trouble - exhaust system work is often very nasty, particularly without a lift, and changing your own oil just ain't worth it. But brakes and filters and ad engine mounts and intake manifold gaskets and belts and most sensors are well within the range of a reasonably competent owner. I've done all of these myself, and I'm scarcely a brilliant mechanic. Basic diagnostic tools are not expensive; I have an ugly $40 code reader from Harbor Freight, God help us, that's good for anything I'm likely to be able to do. You don't want to be stupid, of course; a man's got to know his limitations, but there's a lot that can be done in the driveway as it has been for the last century. OTOH I've never had a BMW, and never will.
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I disagree with slug that one can't work on newer cars, and will fight PMJ to the death over the suggestion that selling part to civilians should be prohibited. New cars are certainly more complicated, but much of what normally goes wrong with them any reasonably careful person can fix at home. Some things you can't - tires, obviously, and suspension work requires special tools for alignment. Some you can, but it isn't worth the trouble - exhaust system work is often very nasty, particularly without a lift, and changing your own oil just ain't worth it. But brakes and filters and ad engine mounts and intake manifold gaskets and belts and most sensors are well within the range of a reasonably competent owner. I've done all of these myself, and I'm scarcely a brilliant mechanic. Basic diagnostic tools are not expensive; I have an ugly $40 code reader from Harbor Freight, God help us, that's good for anything I'm likely to be able to do. You don't want to be stupid, of course; a man's got to know his limitations, but there's a lot that can be done in the driveway as it has been for the last century. OTOH I've never had a BMW, and never will.
    A friend who has been a foreign car mechanic for 40 years & works primarily on Audi, BMW, and Volvos takes his wife's Ford to the dealer for repairs. "I have no idea how to do anything on the car & no interest in learning"....

  11. #81

    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I disagree with slug that one can't work on newer cars, and will fight PMJ to the death over the suggestion that selling part to civilians should be prohibited. New cars are certainly more complicated, but much of what normally goes wrong with them any reasonably careful person can fix at home. Some things you can't - tires, obviously, and suspension work requires special tools for alignment. Some you can, but it isn't worth the trouble - exhaust system work is often very nasty, particularly without a lift, and changing your own oil just ain't worth it. But brakes and filters and ad engine mounts and intake manifold gaskets and belts and most sensors are well within the range of a reasonably competent owner. I've done all of these myself, and I'm scarcely a brilliant mechanic. Basic diagnostic tools are not expensive; I have an ugly $40 code reader from Harbor Freight, God help us, that's good for anything I'm likely to be able to do. You don't want to be stupid, of course; a man's got to know his limitations, but there's a lot that can be done in the driveway as it has been for the last century. OTOH I've never had a BMW, and never will.
    Licenced mechanics in the province of Ontario can write safety inspections. About a year ago, a young guy in a jeep was killed shortly after his vehicle was safetied. It was determined that the car failed in a way that contributed to the accident. The mechanic who safetied the jeep was charged. He is going to jail.

    I have no problem with people doing their own work, provided that they are willing to be responsible for the liability incurred. If you make a mistake on your work, then your insurance company will not pay, and you will be personally responsible. There are quite a few people out there who can do basic automobile service, but for everyone of those, there are three who endanger the public with their backyard bottom feeder fixes.

    The 40 dollar code reader? Oh yeah, it does read some basic codes. On a modern car (last five years) that code reader might as well be a ipod. It won't read beyond the basic code and tell you the secondary codes. Fixing your own car used to be some rite of passage to being a man. Now it is more likely to contribute to a bigger repair, or worse, an accident involving someone else besides the backyard mechanic. Time to stop.

    Here is a guy who did the brakes on his 2005 ford truck and forgot to put the rear caliper back on.




    Just one of the thousands of incompetent repairs done by owners. Why should my life be endangered because someone wants to do his own brake job?

  12. #82
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Just one of the thousands of incompetent repairs done by owners. Why should my life be endangered because someone wants to do his own brake job?
    I realize that you're in Canada, but there are plenty of other ways people can endanger our lives (but let's not make this into a gun thread). There is also the argument that someone with little money is more likely to replace a ball joint himself than he would be if he had to pay labor as well - thus making the car safer than it might otherwise be.

    Vermont used to have inspection every 6 months - now it's one year. Other states (Illinois is an example I know of) have no safety inspection whatsoever! Connecticut requires an inspection when you buy it - then just emissions checks. IMHO, that's insanity. I'd like to see VT go back to 6 months.

    Of course there are the Darwin Award winners. There was a man near me who died because he had his car lifted up off the ground with a rope over a tree branch to work under it. The rope broke, the car dropped, he died. Literally the day after the funeral a friend & I drove by the house & his son was finishing up the repair - with the car held up by the same rope (with a knot in it) over the same branch. We stopped, went over & each grabbed a leg & pulled him out from under it. He was furious. We ignored him, walked 20 ft away & grabbed 2 rounds of firewood stacked there. Each was ~24" diameter & 18" long. We chocked the rear wheels, put one under each side on the frame & lowered the car down on them, then rocked it to make sure it was steady. After that we said "Now go finish it & lift the car off the blocks when you are done - without getting under it!". His response was "That's a lot of work." His Mom's was better.

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Nothing wrong with safer', cleaner cars.

    the auto industry uses fear to convince the client to go with all the bells and whistles. They do this to keep the price of car high in the face of automation and efficient manufacturing. without the gizmos the price of a car would have dropped dramatically and as a result profits.

    The substantial reduction in highway fatalities over the past decade is not from safer cars, it is but because society cracked down on drunk driving

    "Since the early 1980s, alcohol-related traffic deaths per population have been cut in half with the greatest proportional declines among persons 16-20 years old.
    Reductions in driving after drinking saved more than 150,000 lives between 1982 and 2001 — more than the combined total saved by increases in seat belt use, airbags, and motorcycle and bicycle helmets."

  14. #84
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by slug View Post
    Nothing wrong with safer', cleaner cars.

    the auto industry uses fear to convince the client to go with all the bells and whistles. They do this to keep the price of car high in the face of automation and efficient manufacturing. without the gizmos the price of a car would have dropped dramatically and as a result profits.

    The substantial reduction in highway fatalities over the past decade is not from safer cars, it is but because society cracked down on drunk driving

    "Since the early 1980s, alcohol-related traffic deaths per population have been cut in half with the greatest proportional declines among persons 16-20 years old.
    Reductions in driving after drinking saved more than 150,000 lives between 1982 and 2001 — more than the combined total saved by increases in seat belt use, airbags, and motorcycle and bicycle helmets."
    ??

    1) People WANT the bells & whistles! Some one is afraid to buy a car without a sunroof or heated seats? There might be a grain of truth in backup cameras, but even that is more about ease of use than anything else.

    2) No doubt that reduction in DD has saved lives, but even your quote implies it's close to 50/50. Where's the quote from?

  15. #85
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    It might be instructive to look at deaths per mile traveled, about 1/6 what it was 60 years ago. This change is not entirely due to less drunk driving, although that has no doubt helped.



    There are quite a few people out there who can do basic automobile service, but for everyone of those, there are three who endanger the public with their backyard bottom feeder fixes.
    Confirmation bias. The idiot who forget to put the brake caliper back on, you hear about. The 10,000 that don't are driving around with their brakes working properly, and nobody ever notices. Minnesota does not require inspections at all. Fatalities per hundred million miles is 0.65, a bit over half the national average and about 60% of the Canadian rate. Perhaps we also have fewer idiots than average, but I doubt it.

    I do not think that incompetently-done repairs by car owners are a significant problem, compared to drunk driving, for example.
    Last edited by Keith Wilson; 04-14-2014 at 07:29 AM.
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I realize that you're in Canada, but there are plenty of other ways people can endanger our lives (but let's not make this into a gun thread). There is also the argument that someone with little money is more likely to replace a ball joint himself than he would be if he had to pay labor as well - thus making the car safer than it might otherwise be.

    Vermont used to have inspection every 6 months - now it's one year. Other states (Illinois is an example I know of) have no safety inspection whatsoever! Connecticut requires an inspection when you buy it - then just emissions checks. IMHO, that's insanity. I'd like to see VT go back to 6 months.

    Of course there are the Darwin Award winners. There was a man near me who died because he had his car lifted up off the ground with a rope over a tree branch to work under it. The rope broke, the car dropped, he died. Literally the day after the funeral a friend & I drove by the house & his son was finishing up the repair - with the car held up by the same rope (with a knot in it) over the same branch. We stopped, went over & each grabbed a leg & pulled him out from under it. He was furious. We ignored him, walked 20 ft away & grabbed 2 rounds of firewood stacked there. Each was ~24" diameter & 18" long. We chocked the rear wheels, put one under each side on the frame & lowered the car down on them, then rocked it to make sure it was steady. After that we said "Now go finish it & lift the car off the blocks when you are done - without getting under it!". His response was "That's a lot of work." His Mom's was better.
    NJ is now every other year, and just emissions. Used to be annual, and they gave a pretty thorough check of the car. It was an inconvenience, but I thought it a good idea. In fact, we used to have annual bicycle checks at school, which was also not a bad idea.

    Lack of money for repairs can be a dangerous thing. Just, as an example, tires are not cheap, and if one is really tight for money they are apt to stay on the car longer than they should.

    All this, however, seems a conversation for another thread.

    It seems, for this thread, there is a general consensus that not building them like they used to is a good thing.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by slug View Post
    Nothing wrong with safer', cleaner cars.

    the auto industry uses fear to convince the client to go with all the bells and whistles. They do this to keep the price of car high in the face of automation and efficient manufacturing. without the gizmos the price of a car would have dropped dramatically and as a result profits.

    The substantial reduction in highway fatalities over the past decade is not from safer cars, it is but because society cracked down on drunk driving

    "Since the early 1980s, alcohol-related traffic deaths per population have been cut in half with the greatest proportional declines among persons 16-20 years old.
    Reductions in driving after drinking saved more than 150,000 lives between 1982 and 2001 — more than the combined total saved by increases in seat belt use, airbags, and motorcycle and bicycle helmets."
    Much of this is true. Perhaps I'm unique, but I personally know of several fatalities caused by unlicensed drivers who had lost their licenses from drunk driving.

    The "bell and whistle" I would love to see is one where you cannot start the car without a valid license. It's too damned easy for people with the poor judgment to drive without a license. They lost their license because they don't drive well enough to keep it. I don't know if there are statistics available, but I'd expect unlicensed/uninsured drivers cause more than their share of accidents.

    Where I would disagree with you is the "fear" part of your statement. People like luxury. We like convenience and comfort. I don't see as fear has contributed to the sound systems, power windows, power brakes, and air conditioning. It may be a factor in checking out crash ratings, but power seats with memorized settings, heated seats and steering wheels, etc. are convenient, comfort desires.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by John Smith View Post
    Much of this is true. Perhaps I'm unique, but I personally know of several fatalities caused by unlicensed drivers who had lost their licenses from drunk driving.

    The "bell and whistle" I would love to see is one where you cannot start the car without a valid license. It's too damned easy for people with the poor judgment to drive without a license. They lost their license because they don't drive well enough to keep it. I don't know if there are statistics available, but I'd expect unlicensed/uninsured drivers cause more than their share of accidents.

    Where I would disagree with you is the "fear" part of your statement. People like luxury. We like convenience and comfort. I don't see as fear has contributed to the sound systems, power windows, power brakes, and air conditioning. It may be a factor in checking out crash ratings, but power seats with memorized settings, heated seats and steering wheels, etc. are convenient, comfort desires.

    I believe they tried a breathalyzer ignition key in Finland.

    people frozen to death in their cars after the pub closed.

    Didnt work. Too many stiffs.

    a better devise might be flashing lights, wailing horn...you can stay out of thier way and the police can spot them a mile away.

    Locally they use road blocks at strategic round abouts and intersections. Works well...many times you see parked cars and drunks walking on the side of the road...afraid to pass the road block

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Nope, and you wouldn't have the tools to fix it anyway. I'm not being rude, because the first thing you need is the diagnostic tools.
    I have a $99 code reader (does that make me well-heeled?) that benefits me in two ways. First, when the check engine light goes on, knowing the code allows me to make certain easy repairs, like when a vacuum hose was leaking on my F250 or the gas cap was loose on my XC70. Second, even if I can't fix it myself, with the code in hand I am more educated when I go into the repair shop or dealer.

    On the same F250, the code reader told me I had a miss on the #4 cylinder. Googling the code told me it was most likely the coil pack, which I confirmed by switching the pack to another cylinder and reading the new code. I took the truck to the dealer to replace the faulty pack and all the plugs, because I did not trust myself with the thin aluminum heads on the Triton 5.4, and the aft four cylinders are hard to reach.

    When I got the truck back, the plug on the #8 cylinder rattled itself out and stripped the threads afer about 50 miles. I suspected the dealership did not tighten all the plugs after replacing them. Armed with the knowledge that the original problem was with #4, and the popped plug was #8, I was able to get the dealer to fix #8 no questions asked (although it was with a cheap insert rather than a new head).

    Like most things in life, the either/or approach (EITHER the dealer OR DIY/General Mechanic) is inferior to a hybrid approach.

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by slug View Post
    Nothing wrong with safer', cleaner cars.

    the auto industry uses fear to convince the client to go with all the bells and whistles.
    What is the fear involved in leather seats?

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    What is the fear involved in leather seats?
    Sticking to them in the summer?

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by marshcat View Post
    Like most things in life, the either/or approach (EITHER the dealer OR DIY/General Mechanic) is inferior to a hybrid approach.
    Bingo!

    Hence my "educated consumer" comment above. Of course the dealer (or an independent) would've preferred not having to do the helicoil on their own dime.....

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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd D View Post
    Anti-locking brakes and all wheel drive are huge improvements particularly in places where the roads are sometimes slippery. What sold us on our current car was the anti-locking brakes. I tested them by driving 50 mph on a snow covered parking lot and slamming on the brakes. The car stopped in a straight line with my hands off the steering wheel.
    That's good, but the best thing about ABS is that you can steer normally under full braking, if you need to.
    The Case is Altered

  24. #94
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by slug View Post
    I believe they tried a breathalyzer ignition key in Finland.

    people frozen to death in their cars after the pub closed.

    Didnt work. Too many stiffs.

    a better devise might be flashing lights, wailing horn...you can stay out of thier way and the police can spot them a mile away.

    Locally they use road blocks at strategic round abouts and intersections. Works well...many times you see parked cars and drunks walking on the side of the road...afraid to pass the road block
    It's not just a problem of drunk drivers. It's drivers who lose their license and drive anyway. The technology exists to make all cars so they require a valid license to start the engine. There are only a few kinds of unlicensed drivers. Those who never go a license, and those who had one, but lost it via their driving record.

    I would have no problem having to slide my license into a slot in the dashboard in order to get the car started. Then, if you didn't have a license, you couldn't drive to the bar.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    , one year I lost mine..dont know how...fell out of my pocket of something. pain in the ass when you loose it when travlling.

    Do they allow illegal aliens to drive car in the US ?

  26. #96
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    I would have no problem having to slide my license into a slot in the dashboard in order to get the car started.
    'Hey, sweetie, lend me your license for a minute, OK? I need to drive down to the liquor store 'cause we're out of beer.'
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  27. #97
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    'Hey, sweetie, lend me your license for a minute, OK? I need to drive down to the liquor store 'cause we're out of beer.'
    That would carry a major penalty. It would happen, but what percentage of the time? 10%? 25%? Wouldn't it be good to keep 75-90% of unlicensed drivers from driving.

    Loan one your license, and you become unlicensed. Soon, I'd suspect, people would not lend their licenses.
    "alternative facts (lies)" are a cancer eating through a democracy, and will kill it. 1st amendment is not absolute.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    "I've never had a BMW, and never will"
    I agree, and have had just enough experience with them to stay well clear.
    There are other German cars too, they make pretty good taxis I've heard, but the best taxi ever is the Plymouth Belvedere. Now that's a million mile car.


  29. #99
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by John Smith View Post
    It's not just a problem of drunk drivers. It's drivers who lose their license and drive anyway. The technology exists to make all cars so they require a valid license to start the engine. There are only a few kinds of unlicensed drivers. Those who never go a license, and those who had one, but lost it via their driving record.

    I would have no problem having to slide my license into a slot in the dashboard in order to get the car started. Then, if you didn't have a license, you couldn't drive to the bar.
    The problem is not with the technology. The problem is with the large number of cars on the road that will never have that technology installed in them.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    To check all lights, except third brake light.
    Turn on "running lights" and emergency flashers.
    Walk around and check lights.
    Done.

  31. #101

    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    I do not think that incompetently-done repairs by car owners are a significant problem, compared to drunk driving, for example.
    Do you think that the backyard mechanic will admit their brakes failed after they fixed them a week ago? Do you know of a process that investigates whether the vehicle failed after an accident? Nope, unless there is a fatality or something close, there is an accident, a police report, an adjuster and a settlement. The problem with repairs is that the only person liable is the professional mechanic, and not the backyard screwball. I've seen many many home car repairs that are improper, wrong parts, substitute materials and so on. Some of it has been totally crazy.... wooden blocks, garden hose, vise grips on brake lines... etc. On top of that you have people who just don't service their car.... even the basics. I have personally witnessed four or five cars that were driven 25-40,000 miles without an oil change, turning the oil into taffy.....and totally destroying the engine. The last one I remember is a woman announcing her brakes were making a noise on her car, and when the front wheels were pulled, the rotor surface was gone on one side, and the separating barriers between the two sides of the rotor were being ground down. Amazing.

    I know there are competent home mechanics. I just don't think they are quite as widespread as one would think, and the jobs are not as complete as they should be. It's my opinion that either a mandatory safety check or a ban on public sale of certain parts should happen, and probably will. The insurance industry will see to that. I'd settle for the mandatory yearly safety check.

  32. #102
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    'Hey, sweetie, lend me your license for a minute, OK? I need to drive down to the liquor store 'cause we're out of beer.'
    My friend has a breathalyzer in her car (she's mad that I think it's a good idea, but that's another story). I am impressed with the technology, you have to bloow again a few minutes after you've started the car, so it eliminates the problem of using someone else to start it initially.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Malcolm Jardine View Post
    Do you think that the backyard mechanic will admit their brakes failed after they fixed them a week ago? Do you know of a process that investigates whether the vehicle failed after an accident? Nope, unless there is a fatality or something close, there is an accident, a police report, an adjuster and a settlement. The problem with repairs is that the only person liable is the professional mechanic, and not the backyard screwball. I've seen many many home car repairs that are improper, wrong parts, substitute materials and so on. Some of it has been totally crazy.... wooden blocks, garden hose, vise grips on brake lines... etc. On top of that you have people who just don't service their car.... even the basics. I have personally witnessed four or five cars that were driven 25-40,000 miles without an oil change, turning the oil into taffy.....and totally destroying the engine. The last one I remember is a woman announcing her brakes were making a noise on her car, and when the front wheels were pulled, the rotor surface was gone on one side, and the separating barriers between the two sides of the rotor were being ground down. Amazing.

    I know there are competent home mechanics. I just don't think they are quite as widespread as one would think, and the jobs are not as complete as they should be. It's my opinion that either a mandatory safety check or a ban on public sale of certain parts should happen, and probably will. The insurance industry will see to that. I'd settle for the mandatory yearly safety check.
    I'd rather see inspections every 6 months - as ball joints & tie rod ends can easily go from OK to unsafe in that amount of time - as can brake pads. We can differ on the sale of parts though - idjuts are everywhere & I can't tell you how many "professionals" have installed compression fittings on brake lines. You just can't legislate smarts - or outlaw stoopid.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    My friend has a breathalyzer in her car (she's mad that I think it's a good idea, but that's another story). I am impressed with the technology, you have to bloow again a few minutes after you've started the car, so it eliminates the problem of using someone else to start it initially.
    Except a passenger can lean over & do it.

    Nevertheless - I bet it helps.

  35. #105
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    Default Re: How cars have changed/improved over the years

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Accident, abuse, normal replacement (brakes, tires, etc.).
    We tend to maintain our vehicles to a high standard, no abuse.
    Haven't had an at fault accident since I was 16.
    Everything BUT tires is included in the maintenance plan.
    Last time I looked most cars need tires.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

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