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Thread: Oz Politics.

  1. #13966
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Good science and maths teachers are as rare as hen's teeth Ian. If they are good enough to teach it they are way good enough to get a much better paying job with tenure, not term by term 'contracts' that have no pay for the holidays. Thats a starter.......

  2. #13967
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Good science and maths teachers are as rare as hen's teeth Ian. If they are good enough to teach it they are way good enough to get a much better paying job with tenure, not term by term 'contracts' that have no pay for the holidays. Thats a starter.......
    There's much in the Department (sorry... my experience is pretty much one state only, but I suspect that in the state of the Eureka flag, it's even worse).... that is sadly lacking.

    My work in the sector over the decades has been pretty wide ranging but I don't like what I see from a management perspective and I don't do work there now as a result. My crowning achievement in the area received ministerial support (indeed praise - across the political divide) and I worked with some very enlightened educators... but, they've lost the plot.

  3. #13968
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Meanwhile... whilst our Trots have been criticising the LibNats re gas policy.... I see that Gina is suing Victoria... home of the Eureka flag.... for billions of dollars. Something to do with gas and Labor. I suspect she has a pretty decent case.

  4. #13969
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    and.... for a breath of fresh air, the delightful Janet has prepared her 2016 report card on the Libs. Since none of our Trots have been able to master the C&P, I'll provide it for you:

    While parliament rose with smiles last week, we were reminded of Otto von Bismarck’s observation that “Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see them being made.” On that measure, watching the 45th parliament was like poking your head into a black pudding factory. If it wasn’t Labor’s political blood on the red and green carpet, it was bloody-nosed new senators dazzling us with foolhardy performances.

    Speaking of performance, it’s time to check key performance indicators and hand out grades to the Prime Minister, his ministers and the government. A year ago, it was a case of so far so good — a year later Malcolm Turnbull ends 2016 with a solid B+ performance. The plus is for his enduringly positive attitude, a reminder that his predecessor preferred to complain about a recalcitrant Senate rather than negotiate with crossbenchers.

    In the black pudding factory, Turnbull has proven to be a transactional pragmatist, working with whomever he can to pass into law: budget savings (more work is needed with the budget deficit at $37 billion), superannuation changes, measures to protect volunteer firefighters and, most recently, a backpacker tax, the registered organisations bill and the re-establishment of the Australian Building and Construction Commission. All that from a government that scraped through the July election, bled votes in the Senate to independents and faced off against a Labor Party determined to win the end of year wrecking ball award.

    For all the differences between Turnbull and Tony Abbott, Turnbull stuck to the party’s position on a same-sex marriage plebiscite, even though it’s not his preferred position. So far, and let’s hope he keeps to it in 2017, he has respected party policy on climate change, too, even though that may not warm his climate convictions.

    The PM has also been a steadfast and determined defender of a strong border protection policy in the face of hysterical demands for the country to return to a policy that was responsible for the deaths of more than 1000 people at sea.

    On national security, while he may dine with some dubious Muslim leaders at Kirribilli, Turnbull has ensured our security agencies have the powers and laws they need to fight terrorism here and abroad.

    Yet, for all the sensible steps in 2016, there was often a sense of Turnbull bouncing uncomfortably from one issue to the next, from overreacting to the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre saga to being dragged reluctantly to an inquiry into section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. For a bloke who has hardly excited the base of the Liberal Party, Turnbull should undertake genuine reform of 18C to demonstrate a genuine commitment to the values of freedom of expression that underpin his party and his country.

    Turnbull’s B+ is due, in no small part, to the star performers in his government. Employment Minister Michaelia Cash is a brilliant media performer, able to articulate the government’s position on industrial relations, politely, firmly and with smiles galore. She is also a rare reminder of a Howard-era political warrior and deserves an A+ for her handling not just of her portfolio but her ability to negotiate with a fractious Senate.

    Finance Minister Mathias Cormann is the same: a conviction politician who understands the demands of the media cycle and knows how to negotiate an acceptable, if not pure, outcome. Immigration Minister Peter Dutton deserves full marks for delivering in a difficult portfolio, speaking plainly and honestly about past policy failures, including those by his own party under Malcolm Fraser, and understanding that successful immigration depends on support of the community. His use of facts and reason to stare down reckless activists and their ABC cheer squad makes him a worthy and influential advocate for mainstream Australians.

    Nudging close to an A, Social Services Minister Christian Porter and Human Services Minister Alan Tudge are steadily leading the country to a more sensible discussion on welfare, a necessary first step to reform in 2017 given that our welfare bill sits at $160 billion a year, or 80 per cent of all personal income tax collected. And Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg has done a stellar job arguing for energy security in a country that has an abundance of energy but also an abundance of reckless state Labor governments sacrificing energy security on the altar of green energy.

    The Foreign Minister earns an A+. The articulate and classy Julie Bishop makes her job look effortless. Scott Morrison earned a B-. As immigration minister, Morrison performed well with the safety of a policy running rail to follow. As Treasurer, his record is patchier. On the policy front, he is responsible for undermining the stability of our superannuation system.

    On the political front, he could do with a refresher course in the art of effective retail politics going by his tendency to get narky so often, even with Sky News’s fair-minded David Speers. Morrison seems to resent wasting time speaking to the people via the media.

    Plenty of newcomers to parliament deserve good marks. Julian Leeser delivered an A-grade maiden speech, drawing attention to the darkness that befalls a family when a family member commits suicide. James Paterson and Tim Smith have earned top marks for being Liberals and liberals, articulating classical liberal values, from the moral dignity that comes from work to the virtues of responsibility and freedom.

    On that score, new Victorian senator Jane Hume should rethink her curious position as the only Liberal backbencher in the Senate who didn’t support bolstering free speech in this country. With responsibility for reforming MP entitlements, Victorian Scott Ryan earns a plodder’s C for going dreadfully quiet on entitlement reform at the top end. And it’s hard to give marks to Christopher Pyne or Marise Payne this year (though the out-of-her-depth Payne is certainly being carried by the capable Pyne) because we still haven’t worked out exactly who is responsible for what in defence.

    And then there’s Abbott. The former prime minister who left office promising there would be “no wrecking, no undermining, no sniping” hasn’t met his own KPIs. Instead, he has earned the title as the partyroom’s most annoying member. Encouraging friends to go into print or in front of a camera to demand a cabinet spot — or else — is political ransom that shouldn’t be paid. It’s easy standing up for free speech as an MP after you caved to minority pressure as leader. And defending your legacy is better left to life after politics when time and distance may offer a calmer, more objective assessment. Abbott’s nonsensical Green Army policy, for example, is no legacy at all.

    Though Abbott believes he is the choice standard-bearer of conservative politics, others better deserve that accolade. Sadly, Cory Bernardi gets marked down for wasting time at the UN, a body he has (rightly) bagged. Michael Sukkar, Angus Taylor and Andrew Hastie deserve special commendations for reminding us how the Liberal Party differs from the other side of politics.

    If, in 2017, the Turnbull government can master that differentiation in areas from budget repair and economics to espousing mainstream values and rejecting political correctness, it will prove its purpose and earn the support of more Australian voters.

  5. #13970
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Oh.... there's more. Oz's third world state... South Oz:

    Port Augusta’s main drag was so vibrant 23 years ago that Andy Ireland had to set up his Saltbush Surf and Leisure shop around the corner.

    Now Commercial Street in the South Australian regional centre, 300km north of Adelaide, is so dead Mr Ireland and other business owners are preparing for the worst over summer, bracing for inevitable power blackouts and buying extra diesel back-up generators to ensure they can keep the lights on.

    “If this is what the average small business is spending on trying to maintain power, just imagine what a multinational business is thinking about when considering further investment in the region,” Mr Ireland said yesterday.

    Some 270km up the remote highway is BHP Billiton’s Olympic Dam mine: the biggest energy user in the state cannot guarantee power to its operation.


    Six months ago, Port Augusta was home to a major coal-fired power station that employed more than 500 people and provided stable, affordable baseload power to South Australian businesses and homes.


    Port Augusta council says the closure in May of the Northern Power Station by owner Alinta Energy, welcomed by a state Labor government that has declared “coal is dead”, was “virtually without notice and without a planned economic or environmental transition”.


    A submission by the council to a Senate inquiry into the retirement of coal-fired power stations paints a devastating picture of the impact of premature closure.


    The council said there was an immediate and ongoing loss of $430,000 in rates for 2016-17, which has seen a reduction in community services and planned expenditure on essential asset renewal and debt reduction.


    The council also said there was air pollution from a large ash storage area once used by the power station that had dried out, and “frequently ... plumes of ash are blown over the residential areas”.


    “The resulting loss of jobs, income and disruption to the economy of the region, social and environmental problems have left the community of Port Augusta in duress,” the submission says.


    The state’s power system remains dangerously unbalanced, with transmission company ElectraNet urgently looking at options to improve security of supply at a cost of up to $2.5 billion.


    Port Augusta Mayor Sam Johnson said the city had no transition plan, and it was hoped there could be a move into renewable technology in the region. The council also is faced with another environmental problem, with the city’s high-profile Augusta Lakes rapidly drying out from a lack of water flows that once came from the power station.


    Mr Ireland and his wife, Elana, yesterday said Port Augusta’s diversified economy and potential to attract more big business was being hampered by the unreliability of its power supply.


    Port Augusta Auto Pro shop owner David Versteeg said he was installing a back-up generator: “I didn’t realise we were in a third world nation.”

  6. #13971
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Funny... the Trots aren't keen to discuss the leftie-driven education failure, the Labor role in the new coal mine in Queensland, the Labor role in the gas shortages in Victoria, the Labor role in the green energy disaster in South Oz.

    Perhaps they can tell us how good Shorten's "captain's pick" new senator (Kimberley Kitching) is?

  7. #13972
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    We're more concerned with the Liberal denialist disaster currently under way. Turnbull brings out an old Lib policy to restrict emissions from the worst power plants and the RW dinosaurs all trundle out on a mission to crush ANY change for the better.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  8. #13973
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Green energy is coming with it's growing pains and advantages and disadvantages. "Leftie driven" education failure? Yes, well I could never see why anyone would want to be a teacher, way back in my day it was more or less the default profession. But An ex math teacher friend resigned after being told by his principal that failing students was not acceptable as the parents did not like it seeing they paid so much, and that it effected the principal's bonus.
    Kitching? Same old same old. Much the same as Patterson, an IPA clone. Factionalism rampant.
    My favourite Lib statement was The one where the Assistant Treasurer talked of holding the Industry Super funds "to the same standard as the banks".
    And then there's the Lib branch stacking from religious and groups seen to be 'conservative' like Probis. No different than Labour, and disgusting.
    Neither major has a shred of honour and honesty and the 'honourable member' fiction should be dropped .

  9. #13974
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    I suggest 'flaccid member'.

    Rick

  10. #13975
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    We're more concerned with the Liberal denialist disaster currently under way. Turnbull brings out an old Lib policy to restrict emissions from the worst power plants and the RW dinosaurs all trundle out on a mission to crush ANY change for the better.
    Whaaaaat?

  11. #13976
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    I suggest 'flaccid member'.

    Rick
    If that's what warms your cockles.....

  12. #13977
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    Whaaaaat?
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-0...scheme/8098196
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  13. #13978
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Somewhat strange interpretation of the content there, Peter. Very strange.

    Any review considers alternatives.... that's a bit different to what you are writing: "Turnbull brings out an old Lib policy to restrict emissions from the worst power plants and the RW dinosaurs all trundle out on a mission to crush ANY change for the better."

  14. #13979
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Yep, the RW denialists don't even accept AGW so they want nothing to do with any modification .They love coal and can't see any reason to reduce it's consumption.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  15. #13980
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    Somewhat strange interpretation of the content there, Peter. Very strange.

    Any review considers alternatives.... that's a bit different to what you are writing: "Turnbull brings out an old Lib policy to restrict emissions from the worst power plants and the RW dinosaurs all trundle out on a mission to crush ANY change for the better."
    I think we are actually in agreement on something.
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  16. #13981
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Yep, the RW denialists don't even accept AGW so they want nothing to do with any modification .They love coal and can't see any reason to reduce it's consumption.

    The very first time we discussed AGW... 15 or so years ago, I told you what a crappy job was being done wrt promoting the issue. It's a pity the Trots never listen and/or learn

  17. #13982
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    I think we are actually in agreement on something.
    Hey, I'm an old greenie from way back.

  18. #13983
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    The very first time we discussed AGW... 15 or so years ago, I told you what a crappy job was being done wrt promoting the issue. It's a pity the Trots never listen and/or learn
    Sounds like revisionism to me. I seem to remember you adopting it's not happening and if it is happening we didn't cause it.
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  19. #13984
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    Sounds like revisionism to me. I seem to remember you adopting it's not happening and if it is happening we didn't cause it.
    Sheesh, talk about projections

  20. #13985
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Truth is even stranger than fiction, and a lot more interesting.

    Rick

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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    Sheesh, talk about projections
    Nah, it's just that people have a lot better memories than you give credit for.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  22. #13987
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Nah, it's just that people have a lot better memories than you give credit for.
    I give credit for facts and proofs. You should try it out sometime

  23. #13988
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    http://www.news.com.au/national/pm-m...2b0ca64b8e2958

    MALCOLM Turnbull has backflipped on his old stance on carbon pricing after facing a backlash from his own party over a climate change review.

    The Prime Minister was forced to outline his position on a carbon tax today after conservative Liberal senator Cory Bernardi told media putting carbon pricing back on the agenda was like “ripping a scab off an old wound”.
    “In terms of carbon policy, I have never supported a carbon tax,” Mr Turnbull told reporters in Sydney.
    “There are many distinguished members of the Coalition parties who have supported a carbon tax over the past — I’ve never done.”
    But that wasn’t his stance in 2010 when Kevin Rudd was in power.
    While in Opposition, Mr Turnbull said Australia must put a price on carbon while giving a lecture on climate change policy for the Alfred Deakin lecture series presented by the Wheeler Centre.
    “Now, the fact is ... we cannot cost-effectively achieve a substantial cut in emissions without putting a price on carbon,” Mr Turnbull said.
    “We have to put a price on carbon.
    “We can do it via a carbon tax if you like; the better approach is via a cap-and-trade emissions trading scheme.

    “I think most people who write about this in Australia agree on that.
    “But you cannot get away from the fact that there is a cost.”
    In the same speech, Mr Turnbull condemned then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd for abandoning an emissions trading scheme, saying it was one of the most remarkable “self destructive” political acts the country had ever seen.
    Earlier in 2010, Mr Turnbull had crossed the floor to vote with Labor on the emissions trading scheme but the Coalition never brought the matter to a vote.
    Carbon pricing came screaming back into public discussion yesterday when Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg announced next year’s review of the Government’s direct action plan would focus on how climate policies would impact jobs, power prices, energy savings and the challenges and opportunities with reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
    It would also look at an emissions intensity scheme, a form of carbon pricing, and whether international permits could help reduce Australia’s emissions.
    Senator Bernardi said any emissions trading scheme or form of carbon pricing was “economic suicide” and “one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard”.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  24. #13989
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    http://www.news.com.au/national/pm-m...2b0ca64b8e2958

    MALCOLM Turnbull has backflipped on his old stance on carbon pricing after facing a backlash from his own party over a climate change review.

    The Prime Minister was forced to outline his position on a carbon tax today after conservative Liberal senator Cory Bernardi told media putting carbon pricing back on the agenda was like “ripping a scab off an old wound”.
    “In terms of carbon policy, I have never supported a carbon tax,” Mr Turnbull told reporters in Sydney.
    “There are many distinguished members of the Coalition parties who have supported a carbon tax over the past — I’ve never done.”
    But that wasn’t his stance in 2010 when Kevin Rudd was in power.
    While in Opposition, Mr Turnbull said Australia must put a price on carbon while giving a lecture on climate change policy for the Alfred Deakin lecture series presented by the Wheeler Centre.
    “Now, the fact is ... we cannot cost-effectively achieve a substantial cut in emissions without putting a price on carbon,” Mr Turnbull said.
    “We have to put a price on carbon.
    “We can do it via a carbon tax if you like; the better approach is via a cap-and-trade emissions trading scheme.

    “I think most people who write about this in Australia agree on that.
    “But you cannot get away from the fact that there is a cost.”
    In the same speech, Mr Turnbull condemned then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd for abandoning an emissions trading scheme, saying it was one of the most remarkable “self destructive” political acts the country had ever seen.
    Earlier in 2010, Mr Turnbull had crossed the floor to vote with Labor on the emissions trading scheme but the Coalition never brought the matter to a vote.
    Carbon pricing came screaming back into public discussion yesterday when Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg announced next year’s review of the Government’s direct action plan would focus on how climate policies would impact jobs, power prices, energy savings and the challenges and opportunities with reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
    It would also look at an emissions intensity scheme, a form of carbon pricing, and whether international permits could help reduce Australia’s emissions.
    Senator Bernardi said any emissions trading scheme or form of carbon pricing was “economic suicide” and “one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard”.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  25. #13990
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    I give credit for facts and proofs. You should try it out sometime
    After you big boy.
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  26. #13991
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    http://www.news.com.au/national/pm-m...2b0ca64b8e2958

    MALCOLM Turnbull has backflipped on his old stance on carbon pricing after facing a backlash from his own party over a climate change review.

    The Prime Minister was forced to outline his position on a carbon tax today after conservative Liberal senator Cory Bernardi told media putting carbon pricing back on the agenda was like “ripping a scab off an old wound”.
    “In terms of carbon policy, I have never supported a carbon tax,” Mr Turnbull told reporters in Sydney.
    “There are many distinguished members of the Coalition parties who have supported a carbon tax over the past — I’ve never done.”
    But that wasn’t his stance in 2010 when Kevin Rudd was in power.
    While in Opposition, Mr Turnbull said Australia must put a price on carbon while giving a lecture on climate change policy for the Alfred Deakin lecture series presented by the Wheeler Centre.
    “Now, the fact is ... we cannot cost-effectively achieve a substantial cut in emissions without putting a price on carbon,” Mr Turnbull said.
    “We have to put a price on carbon.
    “We can do it via a carbon tax if you like; the better approach is via a cap-and-trade emissions trading scheme.

    “I think most people who write about this in Australia agree on that.
    “But you cannot get away from the fact that there is a cost.”
    In the same speech, Mr Turnbull condemned then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd for abandoning an emissions trading scheme, saying it was one of the most remarkable “self destructive” political acts the country had ever seen.
    Earlier in 2010, Mr Turnbull had crossed the floor to vote with Labor on the emissions trading scheme but the Coalition never brought the matter to a vote.
    Carbon pricing came screaming back into public discussion yesterday when Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg announced next year’s review of the Government’s direct action plan would focus on how climate policies would impact jobs, power prices, energy savings and the challenges and opportunities with reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
    It would also look at an emissions intensity scheme, a form of carbon pricing, and whether international permits could help reduce Australia’s emissions.
    Senator Bernardi said any emissions trading scheme or form of carbon pricing was “economic suicide” and “one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard”.
    Working on the assumption we all have the attention span of a channel ten viewer.
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  27. #13992
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    After you big boy.
    Don't hold your breath.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  28. #13993
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Don't hold your breath.
    You getting the rain?
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  29. #13994
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quite a lot this afternoon, it's just misting now .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Oops:

    Low reserves of electricity supply and the potential for blackouts will dog southeast Australia for the next three summers, the Australian Electricity Market Operator has warned as power plants close and big energy users scramble to protect themselves from volatile prices.

    Energy Users Association of Australia chief executive Andrew Richards said large companies could risk the “extreme sport” of buying electricity on the spot market to offset price increases, while the Australian Hotels Association said some businesses were facing power bill increases of more than $500,000 as they struggled with rising costs.

    In a December 6 notice to the energy market, the AEMO warned of “low reserve conditions” in spare generation capacity available to South Australia for the next three summers and to Victoria next summer, which users said would lead to higher spot prices.

    The warning has come as South Australia struggles without Port Augusta’s 520 megawatt coal-fired baseload plant, closed by Alinta in May, and ahead of the closure next March of Victoria’s 50-year-old Hazelwood plant in Latrobe Valley, which will remove 5 per cent of baseload power from the national market.


    The update on AEMO’s three-year outlook shows low surplus power supply once peak loads are met, outages had been taken into account and other requirements are satisfied.


    An AEMO spokesman said load shedding or blackouts could occur if peak demand spikes higher than forecast, driven by extremely hot days, and the market would likely respond by firing up mothballed plants, lifting gas-fired and coal-fired generation in South Australia and NSW and seeing big energy customers close operations when prices were high.

    Mr Richards, who represents South Australian association members Woolworths, packager and glass manufacturer Orora and Port Pirie lead smelter owner Nyrstar, said that would translate to higher prices and possible blackouts.

    “It also means if you intend buying on spot this summer, it will be an extreme sport,’’ Mr Richards said.


    “Do you play the extreme sport of the spot market game or do you get contract cover? That’s the commercial decision people face. It’s certainly made it far more perilous to be a large energy user than in the past.’’


    Smaller users, including hoteliers and supermarket owners, were working with the South Australian government to harness buying power for a better deal with retailers.


    Australian Hotels Association South Australian president Peter Hurley said power had become “a debilitating burden on business, an investment barrier and a jobs killer. It is surely one of the major challenges for the state.”


    “Power prices continue to rise with absolutely no connection to our low inflation rate,’’ he told a group of politicians, industry chiefs and civic leaders in Adelaide this week.


    “One country pub has notified the AHA that their peak rate has increased by 417 per cent. One company has advised the office they employ 600 South Australians and the increase of their power bill on their new contract that they’ve just had to sign is in excess of $550,000 a year.


    “Yet most of the politicians think hotels can simply pass on the cost to consumers.”


    Representing 600 pubs throughout the state that contribute more than $4 billion to the economy and employ 26,250 people, the AHA would work with South Australian Treasurer Tom Koutsantonis on a collective buying contract to encourage ramping up baseload gas-fired generation.


    Supermarket group Foodland, with 118 stores dependent on refrigeration, is believed to be in urgent talks with the government.


    Mr Koutsantonis said he was encouraging discussions between participants across the energy supply system to provide more competitive gas and electricity prices for all customers.

  31. #13996
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,749

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    I paid our electricity bill yesterday, our daily average for 5 people is 5.5 kwh but according to the bill the average for a household of 5 people is 23 kwh. Surprising and definitely a way around high prices.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  32. #13997
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    62,462

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Meanwhile, something really important at present badly underfunded.....
    Fire Ants
    "Time is running out to eradicate the deadly red fire ant that is plaguing south-east Queensland and could potentially spread across Australia, a new report has found.
    An independent review of the National Red Imported Fire Ant Eradication Program found there was "only a small window of opportunity left" to wipe out an insect that has the potential to be the worst invasive species to ever cross Australia's borders
    ."

    $400 miill sound a lot but not when you consider the implications of NOT doing enough.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-0...re-ant/8100126

  33. #13998
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,749

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    They can render country unusable for any purpose, horrible things !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  34. #13999
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    32,047

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    What's a power bill?
    ​"Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect." Irrfan Khan. RIP

  35. #14000
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Port Stephens
    Posts
    22,979

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    They can render country unusable for any purpose, horrible things !
    Like Australian politicians.

    Rick

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