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Thread: A boat for high-latitude sailing

  1. #1
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    Default A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Nanuq

    The story - and the ambition - is pretty interesting. http://igloo.sailworks.net/boat_e.htm







    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    a go fast high latitude expedition yacht, that thing is ridiculous
    ridiculously awesome

    thanks for posting
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Wow! What would you build if money didn't matter.

    The panoramic shots are nice.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    I'd take that into any latitude. Awesome boat, and great website from the builder, too.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Everything looks cool. Too cool for me.

    Brrrrr.

    Peace,
    Robert

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Looks aluminumy, left au naturel aluminum oxide for best corrosion resistance. Sounds cold, must have super insulation. I'm guessing that open space aft is for a tender. Nice simple steering linkage, tiller but with some mechanical advantage, everything out in the open for ease of repair. Ooo, I like the daggerboards that double as bilge keels/landing gear. Given that, I wonder if they are packing tools and materials for hull repair?

    EDIT: Ah, looks like the crew compartment is composite over foam sandwich and entirely encapsulating, good for thermal insulation, leaving the other parts of the hull unheated. Looks like the roof of the compartment is the outer deck, I'd be curious to know how it is fastened to the hull, how many fasteners and where, and if any adhesive/sealant or whether sea water can wash between into the bilge and then runs out aft or is pumped out.
    Last edited by Bob (oh, THAT Bob); 03-27-2019 at 12:39 PM.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    Looks aluminumy, left au naturel aluminum oxide for best corrosion resistance. Sounds cold, must have super insulation. I'm guessing that open space aft is for a tender. Nice simple steering linkage, tiller but with some mechanical advantage, everything out in the open for ease of repair. Ooo, I like the daggerboards that double as bilge keels/landing gear. Given that, I wonder if they are packing tools and materials for hull repair?
    Click the link, Brother, and all will be revealed...

    Peace,
    Robert

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    A high latitude ketch with outboard rudder is a swell idea. I would have made some different stylistic choices, but the concept is sound!


  9. #9
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    It has an air cooled engine, and electric cabin heat. Weird.

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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    It has an air cooled engine, and electric cabin heat. Weird.
    Supplemented with hot air heat from the engine. Electric makes sense if they have a ton of solar panels and wind vane(s).
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    They look to be around Qaanaaq. I wonder where they keep the food for that many people; if they are supplied by air, they're not really going fossil-fuel free.

    Cool boat, though. Looks well-designed for the purpose.

    What are you doing about it?




  12. #12
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Nice, have you ever seen Pelagic Micheal ? Operates at the other end, but a fantastic design, similar remit.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    A lot of engineering in the systems on that boat.
    Cool indeed.
    Stay calm, be brave....wait for the signs. Possibly precariously prevaricating.
    .

  14. #14
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    That first image says it all.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing


  16. #16
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Nice boat for the job.Its a job I would avoid at all costs,just as I would avoid too much heat.Interesting steering arrangements,I have never seen a whipstaff tiller combined with two rudders and it looks as though the two tillers aren't parallel.I am trying to work out if there is a kind of Ackerman steering principle behind it.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Finastkind.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Nanook.

    Not the greatest name, considering the Arctic legacy of an earlier skipper.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Yeah, I would have named her Imiqqutailaq (Arctic tern).

    What are you doing about it?




  20. #20
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    Nice boat for the job.Its a job I would avoid at all costs,just as I would avoid too much heat.Interesting steering arrangements,I have never seen a whipstaff tiller combined with two rudders and it looks as though the two tillers aren't parallel.I am trying to work out if there is a kind of Ackerman steering principle behind it.
    Modern cats I have seen, like a Hobie wave, do have the tillers (at the rudders) slightly converging when steered straight ahead, this provides Ackermann, which is proper, as the inner rudder in a turn is turning a smaller radius than the outer one.

    EDIT: Oooo, lookie lookie, the rods to the rudder tillers converge forwards, too much I think, too much Ackermann, but now I notice that the tiller arms diverge going forward, to counteract that. Somebody was thinking.
    Last edited by Bob (oh, THAT Bob); 03-29-2019 at 06:04 PM.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    HIGH LATITUDES DRIFTER, by George Buehler

    In summer of 1994 there was an editorial in one of the American sailing magazines that absolutely set me off. The editor went on at length about how light displacement and lightly built, dinghy hulled, asymmetric, high SA/Displ. ratio typical contemporary production sailing yachts, are without doubt the ONLY sensible cruising sailboat type. Yes, as modern skippers stand at the wheel, bareheaded, squinty eyed, surfing their modern high tech and usually very expensive "VunderBoots" down the face of a gale tossed sea, one can imagine their strong chinned and thin lipped face briefly smiling in superior amusement at the thought of some old and boring single hander or perhaps, yes even probably, BRITISH couple like those foolish Hiscocks or Tim and Pauline Carr, maybe Lynn & Larry too even though they are Americans, no doubt HOVE-TO and comfortably laying about inside and reading. What pansies!
    And what Drivel!
    So much of the sailboat crowd is so boringly SERIOUS about things. Yes, though I too once had the moral certainty of the SELF-RIGHTEOUS, I couldn't keep it up. It takes very little imagination to be able to understand that with boats in particular, there are no absolutes!
    The powerboat crowd understands that, although of course it's a bit more obvious in their case. Even a typical modern sailboater can see that when comparing a planing boat that burns 25 gallons an hour and a displacement boat that burns 1 gallon an hour the displacement speed boat is the one to pick if you're going much further than the next fuel dock. And with that displacement hull comes volume for carrying lots of stuff, and heavy scantlings so you can hit things without certain damage. Today, there are a number of long range cruising powerboats on the market that are the total opposite of the typical modern sailboat advertised for the same use. They're built very heavily, they have substantial displacement, and they're designed expressly for a specific purpose; open water distance travel. And what is really interesting is that the people who own them don't have that sailboater type chip on their shoulder about "right" and "wrong." They all know that be it a twin V-12 60 foot speedster or a semi-planning Grand Banks or a displacement speed cruiser OR one of the various types of sailboats, each one has it's place and does its designed job better than the other could in the same situation. In other words, no one type boat is ideal for all uses, which as a group the sailboat world doesn't understand.... Of course it seems every few years something comes along to shake up the sailboat crowd. The '79 Fastnet, Mike Plant's crash, and the '93 storm in the South Pacific that took out a few cruisers comes to mind. But it doesn't last, as that editorial I mentioned at the start of this tirade demonstrates.
    Anyway, this design was a direct response to that editorial. This boat is the very essence of all the old, outmoded, ignorant, and boring ideas that the editorial was putting down. The name is a play on one of my favorite Clint Eastwood movies; "High Plains Drifter." Clint plays a ghost that pays a visit back to take care of a few wrongs. This boat is sort of the same thing; a ghost from times past.
    The idea was for a really heavy duty steel boat that would be pretty much safe to take to rugged places, places that if you break down you're simply out of luck. It's heavy displacement (D/L ratio of 347) allows it to be built like an Alaskan fishboat; 1/2" plate keel, 5/16" bottom, 1/4" sides, 5/16" x 5" x 3" "L" section frames and closely spaced 1/4" longitudinals. While the Great Coyote tends to reach out and slap down people or things that get to "uppity", just the same this boat can with confidence point its bowsprit in the face of most things and come back again.



    Simple, symmetric and fat Lines Plan will bob about in the ocean like a big assed duck!

    Her great beam will keep her from pointing well in much of a chop, but since nobody beats to weather in open water if they can possibly avoid it, so what? In return her fat body will roll along off the wind like a duck on the water, and she has a great interior for spending long periods of time aboard.
    READ MORE AT.....
    HIGH LATITUDES DRIFTER (LINK)


    #include [ std-disclaimer ]
    Last edited by sharpiefan; 03-29-2019 at 02:15 PM.

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  22. #22
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Dumb question, off topic, but it comes up frequently, often perpetrated by people who should know better:

    When did planing hulls turn into "planning" hulls?

  23. #23
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    ^ With the advent of automatic spell-checkers on 'pooters...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    I'd rather this one any day of the week
    https://www.arved-fuchs.de/en/about-us/dagmar-aaen

  25. #25
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    They made a series of videos that are very lovely. There was one that began with them breaking out of the ice after a winter in Greenland, but I can't seem to find it.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwFeGb-4wLE&t=279s

  26. #26
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Yeah, she's amazing... 5 tonnes of fuel, 180hp at 500 rpm.. Built like a brick **** house.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Wow! That's a very interesting boat! And I would love to be able to see what she sees.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  28. #28
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    I keep reading this as altitude, and my brain freezes. Then I click in the thread, and everything else freezes.

    I like all the boats on this thread. Quite unique machines.

    Peace,
    I Need Another Sweater Or Five, P-p-p-p-please

  29. #29
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    All a bit poncy.

    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  30. #30
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    That is a splendid photograph, A C-B.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  31. #31
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    Quite a lot of foreshortening; it’s the Eastern end of Magdalenafjord in Vestspitzbergen, taken from Gravesneset.

    The boat is the Hambly built Bristol Channel pilot skiff “Baroque”.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  32. #32
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    Default Re: A boat for high-latitude sailing

    antartica0310.jpg

    canal lemarie. antartica 2016

    antartica0313.jpg

    dagmar aaen, 2016. a nice expedition. for me the best polar boat. strong and reliable, warm inside, speciall personal bunks to sleep and live on board and with long autonomy, 4000 liters diesel.

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