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Thread: Oz Politics.

  1. #19111
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    South Australia's Tesla battery called on a day ahead of schedule as hot weather takes hold

    By politics reporter Nick Harmsen
    Posted Thu at 6:28pm
    PHOTO: The battery was to be called upon for power on Friday. (Telsa Motors: Timothy Artman)
    e roundbattery has begun dispatching stored wind power into the electricity grid a day ahead of its scheduled switch-on.

    Premier Jay Weatherill is visiting the battery site — alongside the Hornsdale windfarm near Jamestown in the state's mid north — on Friday, to mark its official opening on the first day of summer.
    But with temperatures across South Australia and Victoria hitting the mid 30s, and output from the state's wind farms low, the battery was called upon early to help meet Thursday afternoon's peak demand.
    The battery dispatched a maximum of 59 megawatts of power.
    The 100MW/129MWh battery is capable of powering about 30,000 homes for a little over an hour.
    The manufacturer, Tesla says the lithium-ion device — made up of PowerWall 2 batteries — is both the "largest" by storage and "most powerful" of its type in the world.
    South Australian taxpayers will be subsidising its operation with up to $50 million over the next 10 years.
    In return, the South Australian Government will have the right to use the battery to prevent load-shedding blackouts.
    It will also be able to use a portion of the battery's output to provide system security services to the grid, in an effort to bring down prices.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-3...?sf174803924=1
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  2. #19112
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    Amazing!
    I just heard two, yes two Lib politicians interviewed and not one mention of Shorten! They kept on talking about a bloke named Barillo………….

  3. #19113
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    Shortstop is yesterdays news now.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  4. #19114
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    Yes, I noticed Barillo was the subject of some bile today !
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  5. #19115
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Amazing!
    I just heard two, yes two Lib politicians interviewed and not one mention of Shorten! They kept on talking about a bloke named Barillo………….
    Well here... a politics professor, writing about Shorten.

    If you are looking for evidence of just how broken modern politics is, it probably will be on display when parliament resumes next week. Once again Malcolm Turnbull will be under pressure as Bill Shorten continues to skate through undamaged.

    To be sure, the Prime Minister has many challenges. The Nationals are waking up to the fact being in Coalition with the Liberals may not serve them well. The citizenship fiasco rolls on and reactionary dummy-spitting about the same-sex marriage survey continues without shame.

    But the sick state of Australian politics becomes evident when examining more closely the man likeliest to benefit from the problems with our political culture come the next election.

    Shorten has been at the heart of the cultural breakdown of our body politic for years, as a union official, a backbencher and once promoted to Labor’s frontbench in government. As a first-term MP with powerful factional clout, Shorten orchestrated the downfall of Kevin Rudd in 2010. Why? Because Shorten hadn’t been promoted quickly enough and saw personal advantage in shifting to Julia Gillard sooner rather than later. Sure enough, Shorten immediately accelerated his rise, moving into the ministry under Gillard before the 2010 election and cabinet soon thereafter.

    That moment, more than any other, represents the downfall of effective governance and political stability in this country. Labor went on to do the same thing to Gillard three years later and again Shorten was a key figure, working behind the scenes before publicly backing a Rudd return at the 11th hour. The cultural quagmire infected the Liberals when they also turfed out a first-term elected prime minister.

    Of course there were factors that contributed to the downfalls of Rudd, Gillard and Tony Abbott that can be attributed only to the leadership failures of each. But the notion you can replace an elected prime minister without transactional costs is a falsity that sits alongside the truism that Shorten, more than any other, is responsible for the decline of respect we have for duly elected leaders.

    Yet here we are, about to witness the Opposition Leader become the beneficiary of this cultural malaise. Adding to the irony, the system of how Labor elects its leader has been changed, protecting Shorten from challengers such as Anthony Albanese or Tanya Plibersek. Both are more popular among the party membership, with Albanese proving as much when 60 per cent of members voted for him over Shorten in their 2013 showdown. As if torn from the script of a Yes, Prime Minister episode, despite overwhelmingly losing the popular vote to Albanese, Shorten now spruiks Labor’s new system of “giving party members a say”.

    Equally, Shorten’s tactics in opposition have been torn from Abbott’s playbook — a debilitating approach to representative democracy whereby the sole aim of the Opposition Leader is to win the election. “Whatever it takes” used to be Graham Richardson’s mantra as a powerbroker and numbers man. That’s appropriate for such a person but not a leader. Abbott did whatever it took to tear down Rudd, then Gillard, then Rudd once more. Shorten watched and learned, deploying the same tactics against Abbott, before doing it to Turnbull.


    Once upon a time opposition leaders put good policymaking first, as John Howard did in the 1980s when backing the lion’s share of the micro-economic reforms by Bob Hawke and Paul Keating. It was why Howard and Keating had a strong relationship when Keating became treasurer, just as Howard and Hawke retain a warm relationship today.

    Abbott crushed the concept of responsible leadership in opposition, using chutzpah as a political weapon. Shorten did the same, most recently when using the same-sex marriage issue. Despite being part of a Labor government that did nothing to advance the cause of marriage equality, Shorten has continually taken aim at Turnbull on this issue. While I didn’t like the plebiscite option Turnbull compromised on, at least he’s getting the laws changed.

    But we shouldn’t be surprised at Shorten’s capacity to use political circumstances to his advantage despite his record in government. He was financial services minister and assistant treasurer under Gillard but not once did he push for a royal commission into the banks. There was ample evidence of wrongdoings then but he wasn’t looking or didn’t care. As Opposition Leader, when Shorten saw a political wedge he could use against the government, he championed a royal commission, albeit never spelling out the terms of reference he’d like to see attached to it. It was all about gamesmanship. This week Turnbull agreed to a banking royal commission.


    As education minister, Shorten advocated more students flooding into universities, the theory being that a better-educated society lifted productivity and job readiness. Yes, it does, but nuance matters when it comes to education. Targeted study lifts productivity.


    Shorten left the higher education system half pregnant: uncapped places without fee deregulation. Spending went up, standards went down and class sizes ballooned. More important, people who should have been learning a trade sought a university degree instead. Just this week we saw experts warning about skills shortages courtesy of too few people doing apprenticeships.


    Turnbull will be the leader in Canberra under pressure come Monday, including for his banking royal commission backflip, even though Shorten lost Sam Dastyari as deputy whip — not once but twice within a matter of months on the same issue — because no thorough investigation was done into the senator’s commentary on China, allowing Shorten to promote him soon after demoting him simply to keep the NSW right-wing powerbroker onside.


    Shorten knows that unpopularity as Opposition Leader doesn’t matter as long as his party is ahead in the polls, and he keeps his foot on Turnbull’s throat. The challenge for Shorten if he wins office will be to pivot, to avoid
    suffering the same fate as the first-term prime ministers before him.


    The odds are that he will do just that, protected by Labor’s new leadership rules and helped along by the likely collapse of discipline within the Coalition if defeated. That collapse, frankly, has started.


    Shorten is a student of history. He may have used modern tactics to get to where he is, but he’ll want to govern with the respect Hawke generated via policy reforms. It will require a deft touch to change the negative course Australian politics is on.

    Modern politics has been demeaned by vested interests masquerading as impartial commentators, ambitious politicians prepared to tear down elected leaders and opposition leaders more interested in winning than good governance.

    No one has clean hands, including Turnbull, Abbott and many others.

    But the politician with the dirtiest hands is Shorten. Nonetheless, he’ll probably soon become the biggest beneficiary of the appalling political culture to which he has contributed.

    Peter van Onselen is a professor of politics at the University of Western Australia.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  6. #19116
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Turnbull is backing church discrimination against gay couples wishing to marry.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  7. #19117
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    Interesting article Ian, thanks. But then there's no one in Parliament, or likely the wider political sphere with anything like clean hands, and the LibNats are in the position they are by their own actions, or inaction.

  8. #19118
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Interesting article Ian, thanks. But then there's no one in Parliament, or likely the wider political sphere with anything like clean hands, and the LibNats are in the position they are by their own actions, or inaction.
    Agreed.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  9. #19119
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    The criticism of Shorten seems a bit overblown, the LibNats are in the position they're in by their own efforts. Shorten is no Abbott.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  10. #19120
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    Of the two Abbott is more dangerous.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  11. #19121
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    The royal commission into the banks is a farce that Sir Humphrey would be proud of.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business...ce?CMP=soc_567
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  12. #19122
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    A Clayton's Royal Commission, the Royal Commission you're having when you're not having a Royal Commission.



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    Sunday 3 December 2017 07.00 AEDTLast modified on Sunday 3 December 201707.01 AEDT

    Much has been made of the extraordinary backflip this week by the prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, on the issue of a banking royal commission – from two weeks ago when he was telling Channel Nine’s Karl Stefanovic that a royal commission “doesn’t do anything other than write a report”, to this week announcing one.

    But of course this isn’t really a banking royal commission – it is instead a royal commission whose own framers see little need for it. It has been given just one year – a year less than was given to the trade union royal commission – and with terms of reference that are poorly focused, and which you could be excused for believing are designed to produce little change to our financial system.
    It is the weirdest announcement for a royal commission that I can recall.

    Labor takes aim at focus of banking royal commission




    Read more
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  13. #19123
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    Yep, designed to give a predetermined result, but there are thousands out there that want their story told, and their compensation claims heard, and the Finance industry and Banks desperately do not want this to come out, let alone be litigated or regulated.
    And the Super tweak, just another sop to the private funds and an attempt to nobble the industry funds.
    The government will be desperate to wind it up before an election, and may decide not to release the report for 'stability reasons' if their financiers don't like it.

  14. #19124
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    It is very hard not to be a cynic these days.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  15. #19125
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    I don't find it at all hard, you just have to resign yourself to the fact that politics is corrupt and corrupting and remember they all lie. Chinese walls abound, an ironic term these days when the organisational arms of both parties were soliciting donations from China whilst the political wing protests ignorance and innocence.
    Re Bill's 2015 visit, labour states that warnings from ASIO were not as 'intense' as they are now and have ramped up over time. Well they would say that, and of course ASIO will say nothing. But labour forbad OS donations some time ago, the LibNats have not yet and I seem to remember they got donations from American Republican sources as well.

  16. #19126
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    Speaking of the Chinese, with Steve Bannon's recent visit to the UK I just can't wait waiting for his visit to Australia. I wonder who they would target as their preferred candidate for Presidency er....... Prime Minister? I'm sure there's some maneuvering going on behind the scenes.
    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question

  17. #19127
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    When I first heard there was going to be a royal commission into the banks I thought about time...but it’s not going to be about the banks. It’s just an excuse to put the boot into the unions etc again.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  18. #19128
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    Even the Chinese banks don’t like Adani.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-0...?sf175143656=1
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  19. #19129
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    Being good citizens !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Q&A.
    I find Abetz particularly offensive, but he seems to have an acolyte on the panel tonight.

  21. #19131
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    I didn't watch , politics is too noxious at the moment.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  22. #19132
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    I turned off after a while, a varnish touch up of a new Mirror spinnaker pole in the shed.

    Could be an interesting few days in the house though, how many more for the HC to mull over over Christmas dinner?

    Did you see that Doug Cameron, with a distant Lithuanian connection, might be effected by a very recent law change in Lithuania re the possibility of inherited citizenship entitlement?

    Getting somewhat ridiculous, but then it always was.

  23. #19133
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    I turned off after a while, a varnish touch up of a new Mirror spinnaker pole in the shed.

    Could be an interesting few days in the house though, how many more for the HC to mull over over Christmas dinner?

    Did you see that Doug Cameron, with a distant Lithuanian connection, might be effected by a very recent law change in Lithuania re the possibility of inherited citizenship entitlement?

    Getting somewhat ridiculous, but then it always was.
    That would certainly be ridiculous ! Does that mean pollies need to keep a minutely fine eye on the laws of their parent's original country ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  24. #19134
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    Seems there's a different reality to what gets presented by the ABC:

    A Sudanese asylum seeker on Manus Island who told the ABC’s Q&A last night that all he wants is “freedom in a safe country” has failed to formally express interest in being resettled in the United States, according to Immigration Minister Peter Dutton’s office.

    Abdul Aziz Muhamat, who wore a stars and stripes T-shirt in his video message, said he had been detained on Manus Island for four and a half years.

    “I have seen friends die because of violence and medical negligence,” Mr Muhamat said.

    “We have been attacked by Navy and police and we have witnessed abuse by the Australian government-paid guards.


    “We are refugees. All we want is freedom in a safe country, not necessarily Australia, for example somewhere like Canada, New Zealand, or the United States.


    “My question to the panel, how long will Australia keep us here in danger?”


    A spokeswoman for Immigration Minister Peter Dutton said Mr Muhamat had been found to be a refugee, but had not applied to be considered for resettlement as part of the US deal with Australia to take 1250 asylum seekers from Manus Island and Nauru.


    Mr Dutton’s office disputed that Mr Muhamat was in detention, given the East Lorengau Refugee Transit Centre, where he is living, is an open accommodation facility where asylum seekers are free to come and go.


    “(Mr Muhamat) has also actively engaged in approximately nine protest activities while residing at the Manus RPC and leading up to its closure — he was a speaker in seven of those protests — and has a history of abusive and aggressive behaviour towards staff,” a spokeswoman for Mr Dutton said.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  25. #19135
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    A strange way to treat a person found to be a refugee, why aren't we accepting him?.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    I saw that part of the programme, and it wasn't a major part I think. I presumed he actually contacted the programme in real time but maybe not. He has his barrow to push, Dutton has his. I don't believe much Dutton says on the subject, the caller may also have loaded his statements. Nonetheless the matter is still unresolved and seemingly won't be for some time. The public seem quite contented with the situation as is.

  27. #19137
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    A strange way to treat a person found to be a refugee, why aren't we accepting him?.
    Because we told him to apply properly... and that if he encouraged the merchants of death by buying a ticket on their boats, that he'd never be allowed in to Oz.

    He's got safe refuge. Got other safe options.... and, btw.... he came over 11,500 km looking for "refuge"... don't you think he might have found it easier to find elsewhere.

    Incidentally, I was watching a video the other day and the advert that popped up was in Bahasa - from the Oz govt, advising against taking a boat to Oz. The message is still being put out there...
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  28. #19138
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    That's right , I forgot. Punish anyone who shows initiative and helps himself. Grovelling passivity is the only acceptable approach for Dutton. How very Liberal.
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  29. #19139
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    That's right , I forgot. Punish anyone who shows initiative and helps himself. Grovelling passivity is the only acceptable approach for Dutton. How very Liberal.
    So, ignoring laws and government regulations is to be encouraged, is it? Initiative? Travel half way around the world to country shop, rather than take part in orderly refuge - whilst soaking up hundreds of times the cost of providing orderly refuge is to be encouraged is it? The initiative of the people smugglers, who are responsible for 1200 deaths is to be encouraged is it?

    What pathetic rubbish you come up with.

    Go ahead though.... keep encouraging those who cause deaths at sea. Hope it makes you feel good.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  30. #19140
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    The foreign donations legislation proposed seems designed mainly to shut down Getup, environmental groups and charities from anything 'political'. In other words anything the government deems political, like criticism of legislation, of how rules are enforced, of how govt money is spent. It's effectively a catch all censoring of criticism by threat.
    I'd be prepared to wager it does not prevent cash reaching political parties though that may ostensibly be the aim.

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    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

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    And now it's Labour's turn to test the eligibility waters. More fun.
    Feeney seems a strange one on the face of it.

    It seems that some of the problem might be delays in the Brit civil service but we will see soon enough.

    And Andrew Robb is not happy about the Foreign representatives legislation.

  33. #19143
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    And now it's Labour's turn to test the eligibility waters. More fun.
    Feeney seems a strange one on the face of it.

    It seems that some of the problem might be delays in the Brit civil service but we will see soon enough.
    None of this was a problem when we were all British subjects.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

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    Did you know that Menzies had ambitions and the right to be Britian's war time PM?

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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Did you know that Menzies had ambitions and the right to be Britian's war time PM?
    Well he spent most of the war there so it doesn't surprise me.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

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