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Thread: Oz Politics.

  1. #18481
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Liquid? You think I should have not changed my stance from that I took at 14? You think I should be blind to the self serving practices of parties and individuals? You think that personal principles should be 'liquid"?
    Figures though.

  2. #18482
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Liquid? You think I should have not changed my stance from that I took at 14? You think I should be blind to the self serving practices of parties and individuals? You think that personal principles should be 'liquid"?
    Figures though.
    Well, you've cycled through all the leftie parties and express nothing but dissatisfaction.

    Maybe you'll wake up.... eventually.

    As for Vietnam... you (again) view that from a position that doesn't make much sense. There's many a war that's been fought for the wrong reasons.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  3. #18483
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    I have said this before, and Ian constantly reminds me.
    I was involved in union affairs, politics at state and federal branch level, delegate to conferences on the left of politics. A long time member of the ALP beginning at around 14, also later on when the ALP became too much to swallow the Dem's, and later still the Greens briefly. Then I gave up. After Vietnam I could not have stomached the Libs. I never stood for preselection because I was not a member of a faction, and you have to have the right partner for that game, or change the partner. I chose Anne instead. And of course there would have been many situations where my personal ethics would not have allowed me to support party decisions or those of the other either. My contempt would have been hard to hide. Anyhow I would not have survived a pre-selection process would I?

    I do not feel I should have to justify my position, and I will not again.
    You don't "have" to do anything, and are free to express whatever opinions you like here. Sure, I take a jab at politicians from time to time, and I've never had the interest to be anywhere near as close to politics as you have been, so probably my opinion is worth less than yours. But when I comment that Abbot, or Shorten, or whoever, is an idiot, I quietly recognise that that is not true. I may disagree with their politics or behaviours, but in reality I recognise that both are very intelligent, very dedicated, have made huge sacrifices to do what they do and actually deserve some respect. Well, maybe I stop short of actual respect in Tony's case, he's an actual idiot, with strong religious convictions thrown in. I think most politicians are there to do the right thing. Very few would go into politics just for the thrill of power, or to line their pockets. Many are forced to make compromises they are probably not comfortable with, and some probably lose their way once inside the machine.

  4. #18484
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    But not with conscription thrown in. That stuck in a million craws .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  5. #18485
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    You don't "have" to do anything, and are free to express whatever opinions you like here. Sure, I take a jab at politicians from time to time, and I've never had the interest to be anywhere near as close to politics as you have been, so probably my opinion is worth less than yours. But when I comment that Abbot, or Shorten, or whoever, is an idiot, I quietly recognise that that is not true. I may disagree with their politics or behaviours, but in reality I recognise that both are very intelligent, very dedicated, have made huge sacrifices to do what they do and actually deserve some respect. Well, maybe I stop short of actual respect in Tony's case, he's an actual idiot, with strong religious convictions thrown in. I think most politicians are there to do the right thing. Very few would go into politics just for the thrill of power, or to line their pockets. Many are forced to make compromises they are probably not comfortable with, and some probably lose their way once inside the machine.
    Well said.

    ... and despite knowing some close and strong supporters of Abbott, I'm more aligned to your view of him. The sooner he finds something else to vent his spleen on, the better.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  6. #18486
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    But not with conscription thrown in. That stuck in a million craws .
    Millions, actually. Cost them power, back in the day. They learnt the lesson. Yes, the price was high. No argument. Price of progress.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  7. #18487
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    The price of arrogance.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  8. #18488
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    For which those sent on the ''all the way with LBJ" premise and came back alive are still paying.

    And both 'sides' are equally culpable in the matters of accepting money for influence, in other words bribes. Chinese cash, Gambling, developers and industry cash filtered through legal smokescreens.
    All of them are beneficiaries of very dodgy if marginally legal cash, with all that brings. You can't be a little bit pregnant.

    Of course it seems that very few actually care.

    Most days I can be amused cynical. Today I am angry cynical.
    Last edited by skuthorp; 10-18-2017 at 05:21 PM.

  9. #18489
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Sad to see land developers closing out boating facilities, again. Even sadder to see Ian come along and deliberately crap in the Antipodean playground, particularly so soon after the recent kerfuffle. Not so much with the mention of the development, which of course is boat related. Just dropping in a big stinking turd which is not even a political comment, but pure personal slag. Post 39383 Pathetic, pre adolescent behaviour. Most people grow out of it. I hope Rick doesn't abandon or close the thread, but wouldn't be surprised.

  10. #18490
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Ian doesn't like threads he can't control, there's a history.

  11. #18491
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Re Pompey's yard.
    The council has been hemming them in and denying them useful access to wharves that Jack built, and actually gifted to the council some years ago as a public asset.
    No ethics are involved in this operation at all. Only money and influence.

  12. #18492
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Re Pompey's yard.
    The council has been hemming them in and denying them useful access to wharves that Jack built, and actually gifted to the council some years ago as a public asset.
    No ethics are involved in this operation at all. Only money and influence.
    That'd be Pompei's yard. Don't brake your stretch though, I'd hate to see you loose your spelling ability

    Clearly, you didn't read the link that I posted.
    Last edited by The Bigfella; 10-18-2017 at 08:30 PM.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  13. #18493
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Sad to see land developers closing out boating facilities, again. Even sadder to see Ian come along and deliberately crap in the Antipodean playground, particularly so soon after the recent kerfuffle. Not so much with the mention of the development, which of course is boat related. Just dropping in a big stinking turd which is not even a political comment, but pure personal slag. Post 39383 Pathetic, pre adolescent behaviour. Most people grow out of it. I hope Rick doesn't abandon or close the thread, but wouldn't be surprised.
    Deliberately crap? Nah... just pointing out to the folks that they are making political statements... which you did too. My apologies for not being as erudite and subtle as the landed gentry.... but quite frankly, fake indignation doesn't get much attention from me, nor do the intolerant
    Last edited by The Bigfella; 10-18-2017 at 08:28 PM.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  14. #18494
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Ian doesn't like threads he can't control, there's a history.
    Careful, that glass of yours is always so damn near empty
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  15. #18495
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    For which those sent on the ''all the way with LBJ" premise and came back alive are still paying.

    And both 'sides' are equally culpable in the matters of accepting money for influence, in other words bribes. Chinese cash, Gambling, developers and industry cash filtered through legal smokescreens.
    All of them are beneficiaries of very dodgy if marginally legal cash, with all that brings. You can't be a little bit pregnant.

    Of course it seems that very few actually care.

    Most days I can be amused cynical. Today I am angry cynical.
    Of course people are still paying. It was a war. A war that started 10 years or so after the one before it finished. Well, technically that one, Korea, never finished... but then again that next one is still killing people. Some with bullets that are still being fired (at the Hmong in Laos), some with UXO, some like this



    (this one was from my last trip to Cambodia)
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  16. #18496
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    My political glass? Dry as a bone. But there was a time I believed they actually had principles and ethics, long, long gone.
    Otherwise life is fine, going off this arvo to look at another restoration prospect, a very early International Cadet.
    Sailed yesterday at Kilkunda surf beach. Normally like a washing machine, yesterday barely a ripple and just enough wind to toddle along. Good place for tiger sharks too.

  17. #18497
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    My political glass? Dry as a bone. But there was a time I believed they actually had principles and ethics, long, long gone.
    Otherwise life is fine, going off this arvo to look at another restoration prospect, a very early International Cadet.
    Sailed yesterday at Kilkunda surf beach. Normally like a washing machine, yesterday barely a ripple and just enough wind to toddle along. Good place for tiger sharks too.
    Wrong thread. Get that boat talk out of here. Don't you know that the obsessive compulsive mob will have a fit
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  18. #18498
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Gottliebsen:

    When Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg walked into the Coalition party room with his energy policy earlier this week he faced a sea of hostile faces. But they left the room shocked. At last, the government politicians understood that Australia faces a long term blackout power crisis the like of which has never been seen in modern times.

    It’s one thing to read commentaries warning of what is ahead but another to see a minister use confidential information from independent power authorities and regulators to show the desperate state of affairs that is looming for the nation. And then Frydenberg went to the ALP and showed them the same material.

    If opinion polls trends convert to voting patterns the ALP will be the next government and unless something is done now they will inherit total chaos. There are signs the ALP is putting the nation ahead of party politics and the need for green votes. Hopefully those signs will convert to actions.

    The froth and bubble in the political debate is about everyone trying to estimate how far prices will fall and claiming that clean energy targets will solve the problems. While all these issues are important they are swamped by energy security and the desperate plight facing the nation of Australia.

    I have been writing extensively on this issue and I will list a few of the headlines below but Frydenberg was, if anything, even more alarming than me --- and he was backed by the independent, highly qualified people.

    His slide-backed presentation started by showing just how far electricity prices have risen but pointing out that the government’s action on gas had reduced prices from over 12GI to around 7GI. That will help power prices.

    The fact that the gas stage of the plan has worked adds creditably to the next step.

    Frydenberg divides electricity generation up into two parts — what he calls “dispatchable capacity” and “intermittent capacity”.

    “Dispatchable capacity” is power that can be produced on demand and while it includes coal and gas it also includes hydro, pumped hydro, batteries and biomass.
    “Intermittent capacity” is capacity that depends on weather and is led by wind and solar power.

    Between 2012 and 2017 Australia has built 1,850MW of weather-linked “intermittent capacity” and only 150 MW of “dispatchable capacity”.

    At the same time “dispatchable capacity” has been reduced with the closure of coal and gas fired power plants and the failure to maintain existing coal fired plants.

    According to the Australian Energy Market Operator back in 2012-13 we had 20 per cent “reserve capacity”--- power generation capacity above maximum demand. Currently that’s down to 12 per cent and if the Liddell power station is shut there will be a big shortfall. We therefore face the clear certainty of frequent and long blackouts in all our cities if we do not invest in “dispatchable capacity”.

    The popular media says that any increase in “dispatchable capacity” means additional or better maintained coal capacity. That may be true but it does not have to be, because gas, hydro, pumped hydro, batteries and biomass are all classified as “dispatchable capacity”.

    Most of our states plus the federal ALP have discovered there are votes in key seats if you announce a renewable energy target.

    Victoria’s target at 40 per cent renewables by 2025 is four times the existing level of renewable generation; Queensland’s target is 50 per cent by 2030 or about 10 times the existing level. NSW does not have a renewable energy target but like Victoria is “plonking” solar and wind installations around the state without any understanding that you must have a major content of “dispatchable capacity”.

    Remember if the investment in renewables is in “dispatchable capacity” it prevents blackouts, but such investment is more costly and does not grab the same green vote-winning headlines.


    What makes South Australia different to the other states is that they have actually undertaken the sort of program other states are planning so we know what is ahead for the rest of the nation. It’s true last February South Australia was a bit unlucky in that power lines were blown down and an interconnector with Victoria failed but the long blackouts were always the most likely outcome of their actions. (They are now investing in “dispatchable capacity” because they learned the lesson the hard way.)

    Frydenberg uses South Australia to show what is going to happen to NSW, Victoria and Queensland if they follow their current path. This SA graph shows the share of intermittent power generation between February 6 and February 8 (wind and solar), which falls from 91 per cent to 3 per cent.



    NSW got a taste of what was ahead on February 10, 2017 but tactfully Frydenberg did not mention it because the NSW government is from the Coalition and not the ALP.

    The NSW system on February 10 had 2080MW in renewable capacity, excluding the Snowy, but only generated 707MW from that capacity at the peak demand time because the wind did not blow and at 5pm the sun had lost power.

    And the failure to maintain old NSW coal power plants caused the coal generation to fall 3000MW below capacity. Victoria saved NSW but Victoria is now in a deeper mess as it ploughs on with crazy installations of “intermittent capacity” that will not generate if the weather conditions are unfavourable.

    I can’t think of any country in the world that would be so stupid and do what Australia is doing.

    We only have one hope --- a plan which has been responsibly prepared by the government of the day. We have to hope it triggers investment in “dispatchable capacity” as well as lowering prices.

    All politicians, whether they are in federal or state parliaments, should remember the recent words of the opposition spokesman for infrastructure, Anthony Albanese.

    Writing in The Australian and talking about politicians he said: “We must secure outcomes in the national interest … this requires a greater focus on real, practical solutions to the problems that concern people in their daily lives.”

    There is no bigger problem than blackouts although power and gas prices are not far behind. I am so thankful that the politicians are now finally addressing the problem. Like other commentators I have been highlighting the energy mess all this year.

    My headings include:


    • Energy crisis risk is criminal. March 22;
    • Mistakes caused the energy disaster — what other damage is being done? March 21;
    • Energy crisis will be worse than expected, with costly blackouts coming March 20;
    • Renewable energy needs investment in back up, but who will pay? June 15;
    • True renewables cost is set to shock. June 9;
    • The rules to solve the power crisis. September 6;
    • Repairs needed to Australia’s power system. October 17.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  19. #18499
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    • Overspending on 'poles and wires' is the key reason why electricity prices have soared in Australia

    • The competition watchdog’s preliminary report into power prices found that investment in ‘poles and wires’ makes up 48% of energy bills
    • Between 2007–08 and 2015–16, increases in residential bills were primarily driven by higher network costs. Over this period, wholesale energy costs actually decreased in real terms.
    • Higher wholesale costs during 2016–17 were likely to increase the average bill by a further $167
    • Based on CPI, retail electricity prices increased 80-90% (in real terms) in the past decade

    Over-investment in the “poles and wires” infrastructure in Australia’s electricity network is to blame for high power prices, the competition watchdog has concluded in its preliminary report into the national electricity market.
    But the 175-page Retail Electricity Pricing Inquiry preliminary report by the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission may also spell the end for a national Clean Energy Target, with the ACCC appearing to contradict chief scientist Ian Finkel’s view that prices would fall by 10% under a CET, with chairman Rod Sims saying it was an “arguable proposition”.




    https://www.businessinsider.com.au/a...tralia-2017-10
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  20. #18500
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    It might not be in the national interest, but private and privatised power businesses have their first responsibility to their shareholders unless I am mistaken.
    Re Frydenberg showing the figures to the ALP, I think that Josh does actually have the country as his priority, and also realises that a failure of the system under the LibNats, no matter whose to blame, might keep them out of power for a very long time. Of course the ALP has infinite capacity to shoot itself in the foot so nothing is sure.

    The poles and wires scandal has been a very profitable affair for private power and a scandal no party wishes to tackle.
    I really can see a form of nationalisation taking place in that industry if things go really spare, maybe under a LibNat government too.

  21. #18501
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    NZ

    Who'd a thunk it eh?
    Julie seems to have put a foot in it though.

  22. #18502
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    Bill should've done a deal with the Greens and cut New Zealand Second Last out of its role in it

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  23. #18503
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Bill ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  24. #18504
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Bill ?
    For a Kiwi, you don't seem to keep up with your parent country's politics.

    Bill.

    Bill English.

    Your last Prime Minister.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  25. #18505
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    I was born in WA. I lived in Enzed from year 1.5 to 12. Try to remember.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  26. #18506
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    I was born in WA. I lived in Enzed from year 1.5 to 12. Try to remember.
    It's not me that can't recall the last PM of Kiwiland's name.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  27. #18507
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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Why would I need to?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  28. #18508
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Why would I need to?
    I guess it'd help you look at least partially informed when you come to a discussion on a forum? Oh, sorry, that's an assumption on my part that you'd want to do that. My apologies.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  29. #18509
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    On an Enzed politics thread? I don't go there, the idiocy of the LibNats here is enough.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    Bill should've done a deal with the Greens and cut New Zealand Second Last out of its role in it
    My mail says they, the Nationals, did seek just that...and that the offer was more or less “anything you want”.

    It’s difficult to understand why the Greens wouldn’t have laid on the table a big shopping list of environmental demands and “brought home the bacon”. It was their perfect opportunity - the first time, if I’m not mistaken, that they’ve held the power of government in their hands.

    Yet they refused even to enter into negotiations with the Nats, declaring they would support Labour only. Thus they handed that power on a platter to Winston who, crafty as he is, knew exactly how to play it. Excellent news for Labour of course but a perplexing lack of political nouse by the Greens.

    And how did it pan out for the Greens? Latest I heard was that they’ll have three ministerial spots but all outside cabinet. Winston, on the other hand, has negotiated four seats in cabinet. This is despite Winston having just one seat more than the Greens in the new parliament.

    I’m told that this outcome reflects the condition Winston put on supporting Labour - ie, that there’d be no Greens in cabinet. So I guess you could argue that the Greens “took one for the team”. Maybe they’ve extracted a few promises from Labour on the side but these would be inconsequential compared to feet under the cabinet table.

    It remains odd that a party dedicated to the environment wouldn’t have sought to use their numbers to drive a harder bargain rather than going under with barely a whimper. Still, it’s a great result for New Zealand; fun times ahead.

    And the new quiz night question will be: Which NZ prime minister lost two elections and won none?
    Last edited by Asap; 10-19-2017 at 10:15 PM. Reason: Sp. etc

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    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Sheridan:

    The rise of celebrity politicians, the fall of good governments, the terror of the populists — in its mild, vanilla way, this weird New Zealand election outcome has it all.

    Trust the Kiwis. The thought of perhaps 10 years of good government was ultimately unbearable for them.

    The Nationals under John Key and Bill English had taken power when the New Zealand economy was nothing and the chief ambition of every bright spark around was to get across the ditch. By slow, incremental, careful economic reform they made the place competitive and restored national pride.

    The flow of people across the ditch started in the opposite direction from usual.


    Wellington became a byword for good government. Key was arguably the most successful centre-right leader in the world.


    English, alas, was his John Brumby, achieving a lot in charge of the finances under Key but then, when he got a second shot at leadership with the advantage this time of incumbency, falling just one seat short of a majority.

    English had big achievements under his belt. He was at least as important as Key in reviving New Zealand’s economy. Having shepherded continuous reform through and seen New Zealand’s living standard rise steadily, having smoothly transitioned the government after Key’s resignation a year ago, English was no match for celebrity and populism.

    Jacinda Ardern at 37 is an infant in politics. She has neither policy nor political achievements to her name. She became leader five minutes ago. During the campaign she made an absolute hash of tax policy. So naturally she won.

    These days, celebrity trumps everything in Western politics. You can be an old, grumpy celebrity like Bernie Sanders or Jeremy Corbyn, or an old and grotesque celebrity, like Donald Trump, or you can be young and pop star-like as in Justin Bieber, oops, I mean Justin Trudeau. Any of these permutations can work.

    At the next US election the Democrats could be well advised to run a combined ticket of George Clooney and Oprah Winfrey.

    The thing is to be new to politics and not have achieved anything before you run for national leadership. Then the electorate can project their fondest fantasies onto you. Even better, if you can add to your celebrity the benediction of a rank populist like Winston Peters.


    Of course, when we say that Ardern won, we are only talking about winning under the wacky New Zealand mixed-member proportional-representation system. English’s Nationals won more than 44 per cent of the vote, almost 8 per cent more than Ardern’s Labour. Under a first-past-the-post system like Britain’s, English would have won a landslide victory. Even under a preferential system like Australia’s, English would almost certainly have won a comfortable majority.

    His natural coalition partner, the free-market ACT Party, won just one seat. If only it had won one more. English’s former partner, the Maori Party, lost both its seats. If only it had held on. But these are the ghostly ifs of history.

    English instead has the doleful company of Hillary Clinton in that growing club of sure-thing favourites who faced feeble opponents, won the most votes by a big margin, but still managed to lose the national office.


    Ardern and Peters will almost certainly take New Zealand backwards. Neither likes the direction of economic reform that has worked so well in New Zealand. Both want to cut New Zealand’s relatively modest immigration program which has been a source of such dynamism in the economy.


    Ardern will probably take the country back away from the slowly evolving strategic participation Wellington had edged towards over the last decade.


    The new government is desperately short on experience, has a tiny majority, doesn’t like efficient economics and has an unpredictable populist attention seeker as its king maker. Does that sound like a recipe for good government? It might be, because when anything is possible even a good outcome cannot be ruled out altogether.


    Oh yes, and Julie Bishop better find a way of cooing some sweet nothings to Ardern’s new government, after Canberra ludicrously accused it of malicious connivance in Barnaby Joyce’s citizenship problems. Strange times indeed.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  32. #18512
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh NSW
    Posts
    437

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Sheridan's blurb could be read as a discourse on the effect of populist media on politics.
    It was the media that gave Trump his free advertising.
    I would assert, with no evidence whatsoever, that if the press weren't so hungry for headlines, celebrity wouldn't matter half as much.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge” - Charles Darwin (1809–1882)

    Nutshell Pram Build pictures ; https://photos.app.goo.gl/1GdBcckcgBAWsbVg1

  33. #18513
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Adelaide, Aust.
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Typical of Sheridan slop, the Nats fell not one seat short of a majority but five, or four if you count their alliance partner.

    If he can’t get that right, what value the rest?
    Last edited by Asap; 10-19-2017 at 11:31 PM. Reason: Sp.

  34. #18514
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Livin' in Oz
    Posts
    52,737

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Quote Originally Posted by Asap View Post
    Typical of Sheridan slop, the Nats fell not one seat short of a majority but five, or four if you count their alliance partner.

    If he can’t get that right, what value the rest?
    I think you'll find he did get that right. He was referring to the 2014 election, where he got 60 of 121.

    Sheesh, if you can't even follow that, how do you do with the rest of it?
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  35. #18515
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    44,308

    Default Re: Oz Politics.

    Meanwhile in Victoria, the Voluntary Assisted Dying bill passed the lower house with a margin of 10 votes in a close to 24 hour sitting.
    Has to pass the upper house next, supposedly a closer contest..

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