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Thread: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

  1. #351
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl



    I didn't take many pictures, with no scarfing (the pram is pretty small) the whole thing went together quite quickly. This picture has the thwarts in place and I am using the original boomkin from Marianita to check out how well the three holes that support the mast lined up. The "fins" sticking out the sides are bumpers for the leeboard. There is only one and you flip it from side to side when tacking, we'll see how well that works in practice. I made a "tanbark" sail (a kit from Sailrite) in the shop lighting it is more eggplant purple than brown but I have not pulled it out into the daylight yet.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  2. #352
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Very nice, Steve. That looks good. What thickness of plywood did you use?
    Ian

  3. #353
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    6mm ply, i plan on using this as a tender on the "next boat" too so I was willing to take on the extra weight for the sake of longevity. The boat, minus spars came in at about 65 pounds/29kg so definitely in the cartopper range. We have a big old SUV (a 2000 Chevy Suburban leftover from hauling the kids around to softball games and skiing) that has enough rear cargo space to take a sheet of plywood, the pram will slide in there with room to spare.

    Thinking about oars now.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  4. #354
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Ive got one I built in 4mm but it does seem lightweight for my pudgy bod. Only half built so far, like most of my projects.
    Was supposed to be for kids but its been so long they’ve moved out now ( got sick of waiting i spose!!)

  5. #355
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    That will be a very fine tender to your next boat, Steve. I can picture it now.
    That's interesting, Andrew. You wouldn't even have to bevel the laps with 4mm. The FP plans allow it. I have three sheets of 4mm ply that I bought in 1982 and have been following me around ever since. I bought enough for three sea-kayaks but only built two of them. I would want my FP light enough to lift onto the roof of the Kotik, so 4mm it will be.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 09-18-2022 at 04:31 AM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #356
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl



    Took her for a row today. She feels very small, sailing will be interesting.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  7. #357
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Very nice, Steve. I want one! How long are your oars?
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #358
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Nice. Looking forward to the sailing pics.

  9. #359
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Too sweet!

    Jeff

  10. #360
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    Thank you.

    Mr. Oughtred certainly knows a thing or two about design.

    I built a couple of 14' sailboats before tackling this one, starting small is definitely a confidence booster.
    curious what you think of the coaming vs a higher coaming like Eel's?


  11. #361
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    The cockpit seats are pretty low in the EM so you already feel like you are "in" the boat as opposed to "on" it, I don't know where the seats are in Eel. You have to get pretty far over for the lee rail to touch the water too, so far I've managed to keep the decks dry with prudent reefing.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  12. #362
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post

    The oars are 6'-11" long, 3" longer than the boat and longer than they need to be but I had them kicking around. I will at some point make a set that fits comfortably inside the boat for stowage purposes. The aft oarlock pads need to move 6-8" further aft too, with just me onboard the boat trims down by the bow a bit more than I'd like. Sailing pictures will have to wait until I figure out a kick-up rudder and shape the lee boards.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  13. #363
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Thanks, Steve. I'm starting one now. See "Feather Pram for Kotik".

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #364
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl


    50 watt panel, roughed in on a rainy afternoon

    Charge controller I had kicking around

    Electrical panel with a combination USB port/voltmeter

    I have a series of upgrades I'm working on for Marianita, figured dropping them on the end of the build thread was as good a place as any.

    First up is more power of the solar variety (we'll get to sails later) to run navigation lights, GPS and recharging my hand-held VHF radio. Until now I have relied on a small 6"x9" "dashboard" solar panel meant to maintain a car battery. It worked well enough keeping a pair of small AGM motorcycle batteries (wired in series) charged up until they started to fail last season. One thing all those big FG electric powered boats have that I don't is space for big solar panels, the 50 watt panel I bought fits nicely on the cabin and the cables follow a path blazed by the wiring I ran for the mast-top tricolor navigation/anchor light back to the electrical panel. The location should provide pretty good charging when at her usual dock and we'll just have to see what happens while under sail. The charge controller is new, it keeps the batteries from getting over-charged which should help their life span.

    Right now I've got another AGM motorcycle sized battery tucked away in a storage area (mostly because I knew it would fit) while I decide about lithium or standard deep cycle battery for the longer term. Marianita has lots of fairly shallow storage space so whatever I get will need to be pretty short in at least one dimension.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  15. #365
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    Aug 2021
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    Seattle, WA
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    So glad I found this thread! Marianita is beautiful!

  16. #366
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Thank you!
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  17. #367
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    A little update.



    The bowsprit had a tendency to move port and starboard so I added some whisker stays. 1/8" dyneema looped over the end and running back to a bronze fitting I cast for the job. One of these days I'll cast a new cranse iron with eyes in it but for now the loops are working.



    Close-up of the hardware. So far it has worked well.I have also ditched the old Wykeham Martin furler for hanks on the jib, it is setting much better now though the convenience of the furler is missed. The zippered sail cover is fussy, I've got an upgrade rattling around in my head that will use buckles instead.



    The Feather has been replaced by this Portage Pram "Poppy". The new tender is a much better boat, more stable and rows nicer too.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  18. #368
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    She looks shockingly like a Seabird Yawl from a ways off Steve, I did not recognize the boat as yours until you were quite up close the other day off Kingston .
    i guess that was you anchored there 11 days ago as well then !
    bruce

  19. #369
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    That was me!

    I thought about snagging a slip but they all had "reserved" signs and the "dockwa" app is (IMHO) crap for last-minute decisions to get a slip. "The marina will get back to you in the next 24 hours about your request" bah...

    If that nice northerly had kept up another 30 minutes I'd have run all the way home to Bainbridge instead of rolling around until the ferry stopped running. Not my favorite anchorage.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  20. #370
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Looking fantastic, Steve! I’ve just read through your thread (possibly for the second time), as I ease myself very slowly back into a building frame of min (it’s taking longer than I thought it would).

    What superb workmanship! I love tha ‘Schooner Cream’ colour, will try to find a match here in Aus.

    How are you finding her handling qualities now after several years on the water?
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #371
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    I have been working on incremental improvements to the boat. Tightening up the rig and hanking the jib to the forestay has helped her pointing ability with better shape from the sail. Still working on the best lead for the jibsheets, I suppose the optimal solution would be a track but I sail by solo, getting out there and making adjustments between close hauled and a reach just isn't in the cards so I'm looking for the best average spot.

    This winter I'm reworking the boards to have something closer to a foil shape. She is slow to tack, Mr. Oughtred acknowledged this in some correspondence we had a few years ago. I also have a new rudder assembly in the works to replace the clunky barn-door style one Iain designed. Still a kick-up blade but deeper and using a NACA 0012 foil. The dimensions are based on boats of similar size, we'll see how it works.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  22. #372
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    Sounds good, Steve.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #373
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    514

    Default Re: Eun Mara Gaff Yawl

    What Ian said, Steve. Thanks for the comments.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-27-2022 at 08:20 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

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