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Thread: Moonfish Build in UK

  1. #1
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    Default Moonfish Build in UK

    (THE PICS ON THIS THREAD MAY WELL VANISH SOON. LIKE MANY OTHERS ON THE FORUM, I AM BEING HELD TO RANSOM BY PHOTOBUCKET)

    Just got started on my next project - a Moonfish 14 from Jacques Mertens' Bateau:

    http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php...4#.UpJZRaq9pok

    which is a plywood Sunfish clone. Sunfish are not common here in the UK - the role is mostly filled by Lasers. My teenagers want something more racey than our Lune Whammel:

    http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...rmony/SC06.jpg

    but I didn't want another fibreglass hull, so this is a compromise. We'll start with Sunfish foils and rig (the design allows for this) but may change to a Laser radial rig later. Anyway, the first lot of plans I purchased got lost in a house move last year; I purchased a second set this summer and worked out the BOM. This afternoon, I marked out and cut the first wood - the transom:

    http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...532resized.jpg

    A small start to what may well be a slow build - given the pressures of life & work ! Hopefully, we'll be on the water next summer.

    (Apologies for no directly posted photos - I'm having real issues with the image uploading function of the WB forum or, to be more exact, with a 14kb allowance of which 11.5kb have already been used ! )

    Nick
    Last edited by Whameller; 07-07-2017 at 03:22 PM. Reason: Warning of loss of pics imminent due to Photobucket blackmail

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    [/URL]

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    To copy images into forum from photo -bucket,

    1) if you look on the left you'll have a "Links to share this photo" box.

    2) In that box, you'll want the IMG code. Click in the box and it auto-copies.

    3) After that, paste it into the comment box here, get rid of the duplicate URL code it gives you, and you're home free!

    Good luck, and godspeed. P.s., couldn't get the Bateau image, but it's a speedy looking thing!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Looks like a lot of fun. Looking forward to seeing the updates on the build.

    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by asrainox View Post
    To copy images into forum from photo -bucket,

    1) if you look on the left you'll have a "Links to share this photo" box.

    2) In that box, you'll want the IMG code. Click in the box and it auto-copies.

    3) After that, paste it into the comment box here, get rid of the duplicate URL code it gives you, and you're home free!

    Good luck, and godspeed. P.s., couldn't get the Bateau image, but it's a speedy looking thing!
    Many thanks; I'll do this in the next progress post.

    Nick

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Here's the long, extended dance version. Looking forward to pics of the build!

    Here's how to post photos on this forum:


    FIRST - Don't attach photos. Only a tiny version will display.


    SECOND - Post the photos on the web. Use your own website or a free image hosting service like www.flickr.com, picasaweb.google.com, picturetrail, photobucket, etc. Images posted on Facebook must be set to "Public" access via the Edit option, not limited to "Friends".


    THIRD - Once posted on the web, right-click the photo to "Copy Image Location", or drag the photo to another browser window, then copy the image URL (web address) which will end in ".jpg". You can test by pasting the photo URL into the location field (http://* ) of a web browser and see if the photo displays. Remember that this process will not work for photos located just on your computer, on members-only Yahoo groups, or on Facebook unless set to "Public" view.


    (In Flickr - You usually have to first click the photo to bring up the black-framed viewer, then click the "View All Sizes" link near the top right. Then you can get the image URL by right-clicking the image. Alternately you can go to the Actions menu on the upper left, then select "View All Sizes".


    FOURTH - DO THIS EVERY TIME TO POST IMAGES IN THREADS:
    A. In any "Reply" window you can click the "insert image" icon --> a little yellow square icon with a dot at each corner, a tiny tree in the center.


    Depending on browser version and Reply/Edit status, this may bring up a simple window with a field to paste the URL into, or the "Add an Image" window described below.


    B. If the window titled "Add an Image" comes up, click the "From URL" tab, paste the URL of the photo in the field, deselect the box for "Retrieve remote file and reference locally", then click the "INSERT IMAGE" button. The Forum software will resize some large images, so look at your post to see the actual displayed images.


    NOTE - most common problems are due to missing the step described above -> deselect the box for "Retrieve remote file and reference locally"
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Thanks again for the advice on uploading images - it seems to have worked.

    A bit more progress.

    This is the main bulkhead which forms the aft part of the dagger board/mast trunk and the forward part of the cockpit:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    And theses are the sides of the trunk:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    All in 12mm WBP ply. I'm using up some of my workshop offcuts from previous builds and repair work - its surprising how many components for a small craft like this you can get out of offcuts, which all reduces the cost of the project (not to mention clutter in the workshop !). The frame is going to end up a mix of WBP and Robbins Elite marine ply; the former is more than adequate as the design is explicitly an epoxy/ply sandwich - the latter is overkill in quality terms, but it was lying about in small parts, so .....

    I have done more, but not taken the photos yet. There are still quite a few frame components to make before any sort of assembly starts !

    Nick
    Last edited by Whameller; 12-01-2013 at 07:12 AM. Reason: Typo correction

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    A bit more progress: I have now completed all the frame components. I couldn't resist setting them out roughly, so that I could begin to get a clearer picture of what I am building.

    A view from the stern:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    another from up towards the bow looking at the daggerboard trunk:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    And a final closer view from the stern:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    For bulkhead C (the one with the central circular and two rectangular side cutouts) which is the rear bulkhead of the cockpit well, the design called for 6mm ply. I had run out of large enough stock scraps for this, so laminated it from two 4mm layers; I reckon that a little extra strength at the rear of the cockpit (the forward bulkhead is 12mm) will be no bad thing.

    Somehow this seems bigger than a Laser hull - though they are nominally about the same length.
    Nick

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Following along. These look fun and relatively easy to build. Sails can be had cheap.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    If the finished product looks as well executed as the framework you have built a winner.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    Following along. These look fun and relatively easy to build. Sails can be had cheap.
    Sadly, not in the UK where the Sunfish is hardly known and importing from the US is prohibitively expensive becuase the UK import tax & VAT is not just on the cost of the sail but the shipping cost as well - plus import agent handling fees, etc, etc .....

    I'm planning to use polytarp for the first sail, then have a proper sail made up locally once I have the correct dimensions and cut worked out.
    Last edited by Whameller; 12-11-2013 at 05:23 AM.
    Nick

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyahoga Chuck View Post
    If the finished product looks as well executed as the framework you have built a winner.
    Thank you. I'm taking a slow & steady approach - long way to go yet. I've just taken delivery of the epoxy, tape and glass and the ply and timber arrives later today.
    Nick

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    The Moonfish is built upside down, using the deck as the reference. I've now spliced together the 2 sheets of 6mm ply that make up the deck:



    Before doing this, I dry-fitted and clamped the sheets together so that I could draw the grid and mark out the sheer lines. This, in turn, allowed me to rough-cut to within about an inch of the lines - making the sheets much easier to move around in a confined space.

    The sheets are spliced on one side only (upper as you look at it now, but will be the underside of the deck once complete) with 100mm woven tape & epoxy. They are clamped between two boards wrapped (smoothly & tightly) with polythene, which hopefully should give a smooth finish requiring minimum sanding. Poor man's peel ply ! The boards are the 2 sides of the daggerboard/mast trunk - perfect size for the job !

    The splice of the deck sheet worked out well, although - given the low (for UK) temperature - it took over 48 hours for the epoxy to cure:


    After which I planed down to the marks all round and then marked out the positions of the bulkheads. Either there is a discrepancy in the plans between the sheet cutting plan and the bulkhead position plan, or I have cut the bow of the deck out 20mm short ! I'm pretty certain its not me as I have checked & re-checked my marking out against the plans before cutting. Whatever, the sheer line is fair and I reckon that I will be able to adjust the side and bottom sheets if necessary.

    The next step is to assemble the daggerboard/mast trunk (you can just see it under the bench in the photo above). Here's a better view of it in the process of being dry assembled:


    The bulkheads are there to provide reference points and the bow stringer (with 6mm doublers either side of the forward 76mm) forms part of the trunking assembly.

    Here's a view of the daggerboard slot:


    Getting this the right width (not fully specified in the plans) took quite a bit of calculation - factoring in the thickness of the 2 layers of 12mm ply, glue joint and glassing the sides of the well, plus 3mm play on each side.

    Here's as shot of the mast well:


    which is easier to calculate (again, not given in the plans) as I know the OD of the mast tube. The packing pieces immediately fore and aft of the well are oak from my offcuts box as I reckon that this area is going to take a fair amount of stress - so I want something tougher than the pine recommended in the plans

    To the left of the clamp, there is a complex joint where the bow stringer enters the trunking. This requires some experimentation with packing pieces (no, sizes not in the plans !) to get a good fit:


    Once I've got the fit right, I'll tidy up the packers to match the bow stringer, bulkhead and trunking.

    Next up will be the glueing up, which I think will be at least a 2 stage process.
    Nick

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    I am restoring an Australian Sailfish, designed in the 1950's, we built ours about 1962 or so but it was never quite watertight. I was given a much better hull and that's what is under restoration. Very similar design looking at your moulds but shallower and no well. Fully battened sail and fully stayed mast. Overpowered of course and requiring a crew of 2. There are signs that this boat also was rigged for a trapeze. It seems there are no pics on the web of a complete rigged boat. There were class associations, races, championships and trophies up to the mid 1980's

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    I've got some Sailfish info on another computer. I'll have a dig this evening and see if I have any pics of a fully rigged boat.
    Nick

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    ....nice job so far Nick.....keep up the 'great work!!

    martin

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by olecaplinface View Post
    ....nice job so far Nick.....keep up the 'great work!!

    martin
    You are very kind. I'm plugging on steadily - still on page 1 of the builder's notes !
    Nick

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Hi
    Why not just use a topper rig?
    Any more thoughts on a big boat build?
    GG?
    Pilgrim?
    James

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesh View Post
    Hi
    Why not just use a topper rig?
    Any more thoughts on a big boat build?
    GG?
    Pilgrim?
    James
    I'll experiment with a polytarp Sunfish rig, but may well end up with a Laser rig - possibly the Radial - in the end. I'm building with this in mind.

    Still havering about the possibilities for the big boat build; current lead contenders are GG or Cape Cutter 19. Whatever it will be will need to have a cuddy or small cabin - so Pathfinder or a stretched Pilgrim with a cabin are still in contention. I prefer the aesthetics of Pathfinder (Pilgrim looks a bit slab sided to my eye) but the design parameters of Pilgrim match our need more closely. Whatever - I still have a couple of years or so before the build of whatever it will be can start.
    Nick

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Great thread and great work Nick.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    The Moonfish design uses the inverted deck accurately marked out as the building jig for the frame. Here you can see that, after I marked out the positions of the bulkheads and stringers on the deck in pencil, I covered them with parcel tape and then remarked with permanent marker:

    The tape is to prevent the frame sticking to the deck at this stage of assembly; the green polythene sheet serves the same function for the daggerboard/mast trunking assembly. The cleats around the sheerlines are screwed on temporarily and will be used when fixing the hull side panels to the frame.

    I start the daggerboard trunk in two halves. When it was accurately dry assembled, I drilled it for dowels which will provide accurate and positive location during assembly:

    I've learned the hard way that epoxy coated components are slippery and tricky to clamp together accurately !

    Once those packing pieces were glued on, I then coated the trunk sides with glass cloth and epoxy:

    These will need a second coat of epoxy before assembly of the trunk. Once assembled, the ends formed by the packing pieces will be covered by glass tape and epoxy.

    Next up is the bow stringer, which gets doublers at the bow and packing pieces where it goes into the daggerboard/mast trunking:






    This will be the last post on construction until 2014, as we are decamping to Pembrokeshire for the Christmas and New Year. I listened to my last student presentations today, although I do have the coursework for their Master's module to assess and mark over the holidays !
    Nick

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Holidays over, back at work - I've had some time to make some progress over the last couple of weekends.

    Last weekend, I got the trunking that houses both the daggerboard and mast wells assembled:

    [IMG][/IMG]
    (there are 19 separate components in this assembly - I used nearly that many clamps)
    This is the key assembly of the whole frame and includes the bow stringer. Assembly was a three stage process needing patience as I waited for the epoxy to go off before being able to move on to the next stage.

    Here's the result:



    This weekend, I moved on to bulkheads A and B.

    Bulkhead A is in 2 parts:



    and needed some careful dry assembly and pre-setting of supporting cleats to ensure that the alignment was correct:





    I then moved on to bulkhead B, which is the main load bearing cross-boat structure in the boat and forms the forward wall of the cockpit/well:



    So that's the forward half of the frame complete.
    Nick

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    The frame is now complete:



    Bulkhead C has a doubler to give some meat for the screws when I come to fit the watertight hatch:



    And I need to move on to marking out the side and bottom panels. The only place I have space is up:





    A couple of long battens, 2 slings and 4 carabiners from my climbing days, some parcel tape and up she goes. This gives me space to mark out on ply sheets that have been pre-cut in half lengthways - careful study of the nesting diagram allowed me to solve a storage problem earlier.



    I've now got half the 4 bottom panels marked and cut out (thanks to a brief break in the appalling weather we're having in the UK this winter allowing to get outside to cut panels) and will do the other 2 tomorrow; the weather forecast is dry.
    Nick

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    It's been a while .....


    since I last posted but I've managed to make a fair bit of progress on the Moonfish build.

    First I got the side panels tacked on with staples (through thin ply pads to make extraction easier):



    And then filleted and epoxy taped both sides of each bulkhead/side panel joint. I then realised that I had an issue with the height of both sides of bulkhead A:


    which was solved by cutting and planing them down to fit:


    Where the side panels meet at the bow, I put in a piece of oak forward of the frame doubler to add a bit of resilience:



    Nick

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    And some more .......

    I had already pre-cut the four bottom panels, which now had a trial fit. No problems with the bow pair, but there was an issue with the after pair:






    I decided to make a fillet for this gap. The first step was to mark out a rough template onto a length of paper (fax roll):





    Once I had an oversized fillet cut from ply with the jigsaw, I then refitted the panels and took measurements of the width at 10cm (4") intervals, marked them onto the fillet and cut again with a Japanese hand saw. It was then a question of gradually planing it to fit until I had this:





    The panels were then tacked into place with staples, trimmed to fit and the daggerboard slot opening cut. All the seams were then taped with parcel tape:






    The hull was then turned over and the deck removed:





    Next up - a lot of filleting and epoxy taping .........
    Nick

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    I thought you would have glassed and sanded the dagger board slot before assembly.
    What is your plan for that?
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    I thought you would have glassed and sanded the dagger board slot before assembly.
    What is your plan for that?
    I did (post #21) ! The sides of the trunk got glass cloth, the ends were taped after assembly but before connecting the daggerboard trunking to the main backbone trunking..

    There is a certain amount of loose crud (shavings, sawdust, etc) in the top of the slot, which will vacuum out.

    Before I glass the bottom, the trunk slot to bottom join will be glassed in. Inside the hull, the trunking is in the process of being glass taped to the bottom panels.
    Last edited by Whameller; 02-08-2014 at 06:59 AM. Reason: Expansion of detail
    Nick

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    This is not really exciting stuff (I much prefer the woodwork), but here are some photos:





    Thrilling, eh ?
    Nick

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    That done, I began fitting the cleats on all the bulkheads that both give them additional strength and provide bonding/bearing surfaces for the deck:





    In the last shot, you can also see the additional 12mm support pad (so 24mm in all - say 1") for the rudder gudgeons.

    The end result looked like this:




    Nick

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    All this while, the deck panel (really flexible & flimsy-seeming) had been stored off to one side - you can just see it on the left in the pic above. Now it was back on (upside down) to work out where all the deck fittings were going to go (I used the Sunfish class rules diagrams to guide me here), so that I could fit the doublers to support them:



    I had to try to take account also of where the bulkheads and stringers would be, which I didn't quite get right (I forgot the width of the cleats in several places) and had to do some refitting when it came to fitting the deck right way up.

    Then it was time to re-fit and epoxy glue all the side cleats (which had been on the deck when it was used as a building jig for the sides). The builders notes said to use temporary screws to hold them while the epoxy set, but I used staples as they are faster and leave smaller holes to be filled and faired. I put them in through bits of old ice cream cartons which made later extraction much easier. Not my trick - one I found on the net somewhere - but it worked a treat:


    Nick

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Next came the paint job on the cockpit and watertight compartment, together with the fittings for which I needed access to both sides of bulkheads B and C at each end of the cockpit (the hatches and the hiking strap fittings):




    Nick

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    The deck was to come next. I really struggled to get it aligned properly with it in one piece. So,after much thought and with considerable trepidation,

    ....... I cut it in half again !


    I realised that the join fell exactly astride bulkhead B at the forward edge of the cockpit. This would give it more than adequate support, even if it did give me some minor fairing issues later on.

    The deck was then glued down in two halves, held temporarily with screws into the cleats and staples into all the bulkhead and stringer cleats:

    The stern half went on first; the bow half is shown above.

    Once the screws and staples were removed, I planed and sanded all the seams to get a 1/2" radius before the taping work began again.

    This is where I've got to so far:






    The hull is structurally complete, with all seams epoxy taped. The cockpit was finished and painted before fitting the deck. It has a watertight stowage compartment aft (the two forward hatches are for ventilation of the hull when stored), a hiking toe strap (made from an old car seat belt) and non-slip tape on the sole. The paint is white domestic exterior gloss over two layers of epoxy. There is a layer of fibreglass on the sole to add strength and abrasion resistance.
    Nick

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Excellent! You'll be sailing in no time at all!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Well - hull complete, painted, varnished and fitted out !









    No photos of how I got there, I'm afraid. Hours and hours of filling, painting, sanding and fairing. Not my favourite jobs (tho' critical to the final aesthetics) and not exciting to photograph.

    The hull is painted in marine paint over marine primer (both ebay bargains). The varnish is Coo-Var yacht & seaplane varnish, the white paint ordinary exterior house gloss and the red detail line is all-purpose exterior enamel. Rubbing strips are varnished oak D strips from the local DIY store, fastened with bronze ringnails into the chocks (holes sealed with marine mastic). The last photo shows the mainsheet horse and the sunfish-styled rudder fitting.

    I need to get the hull onto the trailer (I still haven't posted about renovating that yet), so that I can clear space to work on the foils and spars.
    Nick

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Moonfish Build in UK

    Nice job Nick.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

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