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Thread: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Don't forget the limber holes. Nick the corners off the frames where they notch around the planking and keel. This lets bilge water flow free and not get trapped. It'll all drain to the low spot in the boat to be bailed out.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Don't forget the limber holes. Nick the corners off the frames where they notch around the planking and keel. This lets bilge water flow free and not get trapped. It'll all drain to the low spot in the boat to be bailed out.

    Those pictures were of the rough fit- below is one with limber holes. To be honest, if the plans hadn't called for limber holes- I wouldn't have known to put them in (or even what they were). That was the level of my boatbuilding knowledge at this point in the build.

    I should remind everyone though, that this thread starts at the beginning of the project which was actually nearly 3 years ago. The picture in question is about 2 years old. I'll let you all know when I'm up to present time- though you will surmise it when the picture posting suddenly slows to a snail's pace.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Felt like doing something different- so it's on to the centerboard.
    The plan calls for a 5 piece board splined and thru-bolted together with about 25 lbs. of lead. This is what I did, though if I were doing it again, I would think about making it with 4 layers of 1/4" marine plywood. (yes, plywood... no one but a frogman with a wood rasp would ever have to know) I think that would be stronger and easier, avoiding the through-bolts. I have some concern that if someone stands on the centerboard to right the boat in the event of a capsize, it (the centerboard) could snap at the line of a through-bolt. The bolts are epoxy cast in place so maybe there is no loss of strength. An engineer will have to answer that question for me.


    Still didn't know what a spline was, so I did tongue and groove - and 4 pieces instead of 5. Cut out for the lead disc that will be poured into it. Calculated the hole size by a little math and the density of lead to find what I needed for 25 lbs. Ended up about 27 lbs.






    5/16" holes drilled for 1/4-20 stainless all-thread. The board is 1" thick. Don't worry, the large holes you see are to allow for the nuts and do not go all the way through of course...




    Sloppy groove cut by the wrong bit in a router to hold the lead in place after it cools.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Melting lead. This was 1/8" lead sheet peeled off of special drywall from an x-ray room at a hospital. Glad I didn't have to install that drywall. Somewhat scary process even for a tiny pour like this one- makes me even more impressed by some of the large pours I see on this forum involving thousands of pounds.


    This is the only mistake I made in the process. I clamped the board down on top of aluminum foil on a piece of drywall- that would have been an excellent plan if I had drilled a small hole in the drywall under the foil to allow the expanded air to escape. The air under the foil expanded and was trapped, causing it to bulge upward and make a concave surface on the underside of the lead. Not a big deal, but I did need to repair it, thus adding an unnecessary step. Lesson learned.


    You will see another mistake on the centerboard. Being an old carpenter, I misunderstood the plans and cut beautiful scalloped edges on the board instead of the foil shape that the designer was looking for. Fortunately I sent pictures to Don and he nicely told me the obvious: that my scalloped edges were about as hydrodynamic as a brick. (albeit a very beautiful brick). Back to the shop for remedial work. Should have been obvious to me...


    Cooling


    Circular saw makes a perfect fairing tool.


    Finished board - beautiful mahogany which no one will ever see. The lead shrunk and rattled in it's hole. I cast it in thickened epoxy, faired the surface, and painted it with bottom paint. (after fixing the scalloped edges.)

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Enjoying the thread very good documentation! Did you glass the centreboard?

    /fredrik

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by trango View Post
    Enjoying the thread very good documentation! Did you glass the centreboard?

    /fredrik
    Thanks for the question- I forgot to say that I glassed the leading edge to protect against gravelly beaches.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Finished and painted centerboard, not quite dry yet. I'll set this aside to be installed in a year or two. This is not a job for the impatient.
    Next, on to making the centerboard case.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Building the centerboard case. Sides are 1/2" marine ply.


    Centerboard case epoxy coated with pigmented epoxy with mahogany pivot block in place.


    I decided to attach the bedlogs now rather than installing them in place in the boat. This way I can install everything as a unit and it's easier to clamp as well. Everything has been dry-fit in the boat of course. Bedlogs are notched for the floors.


    Testing the operation of the centerboard. It pivots on a 3/4" bronze shaft and a brass bushing.


    Sanded and ready for installation. The hole at the front of the case is for the outlet of the bilge pump.


    Installing. Very strong joint between the case and keel- essentially a very large mortise and tenon joint. Bulkheads will secure it fore and aft, and floors will be glued and screwed along the length- this case isn't going anywhere.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Lovely design, great job, great and instructive thread. It is really interesting to see the two different kinds of 18 footers Don drew. Congratulations on your choice.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hvalsoe View Post
    Lovely design, great job, great and instructive thread. It is really interesting to see the two different kinds of 18 footers Don drew. Congratulations on your choice.
    Thanks for the kind words. I almost built Alaska because I was taken in by that beautiful transom- but I figured I needed a little more volume.
    Last edited by dktyson; 09-30-2013 at 05:34 AM.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Centerboard installed. That opens the way to the installation of nearly everything else- bulkheads, floors, frames, risers and sheer clamps. First: bulkheads.



    Bulkheads are 1/4" marine ply. After an hour of scribing the first one, I hit upon this method. Install a pair of frames, and then shoot a rough cut scrap of plywood to it with a brad nailer to hold it's shape. Remove the frames and trace the whole thing onto the plywood. All it requires then is some minor adjustment and you've got a perfect bulkhead.


    Do the same thing six times...


    Aft bulkhead. This forms the front of the aft watertight compartment.


    Forward bulkhead. This makes the front watertight compartment. I like the amount of flotation this boat has. No need for any airbags or foam.



    All the bulkheads rough fit. Need limber holes and some final adjustments.
    In this design, I like the way Don gives a nod to tradition with her lines and rig, that's what caught my eye the first time. However, function was the first priority and this boat is purpose built as a camp cruiser. The two bulkheads amidships form a storage locker for gear and the bench arrangement allows for a sleeping platform and even more stowage. No apologies for plywood and modern building techniques.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    There seems to be something so satisfying about the build. Beautiful. Joinery is top notch.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by capefox View Post
    There seems to be something so satisfying about the build. Beautiful. Joinery is top notch.
    Disclaimer: Funny how the joinery is always better if the boatbuilder also takes the pictures. Thanks though. I really could have used the experience and tools of a cabinet maker for what is coming up. So far my construction worker skills have stood me in good stead with the basic structure and all these parts that will get painted.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Framing the aft watertight compartment. This will get a top of 1/4" marine ply rabbetted into the risers. Removable watertight inspection ports will fill the holes in the front.


    Fitting the floors


    All the floors on display. There are full size patterns in the plans. They all fit with minor adjustments. The compound angles on these make them challenging.


    Floors installed. I'm coating all interior parts with pigmented epoxy. The interior will be painted white and if there are nicks in the paint, I don't want them to show wood.




    You can see that the centerboard case is very securely locked in place.
    Last edited by dktyson; 11-03-2013 at 05:23 AM.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    You're good at this but then perhaps time lapse photos help !
    Last edited by PeterSibley; 10-01-2013 at 07:02 PM.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  16. #86
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Oh, I forgot to mention that this design was featured in Woodenboat 2012 issue of Small Boats. Ted Cody's Rachel is shown.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    You're good at this but then perhaps time lapse photos help !
    Have you gotten the idea that I took a lot of photos? Only about a thousand actually. Don't worry, I'm not obsessive.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Building the main mast step. Not hard to build once you understand the drawing- the tapered socket is hard to picture when looking at 2D drawings.



    Mast step box sides fit into the cutouts on the sides. The angled cuts at the front will rest on frames and keel while the front is glued to a bulkhead. Very solidly placed.


    Ready for installation. Limber holes allow the socket to drain. I wouldn't have thought of that...


  19. #89
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by dktyson View Post

    Ready for installation. Limber holes allow the socket to drain. I wouldn't have thought of that...
    Note to self .... remember limber holes in mast step!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by dktyson View Post
    ....................... If anybody out there knows of a power tool to do this- let me know for next time.
    I used a bastard cut rasp (round face side) and gloves - cheap and did a strong cut through the epoxy - would work better joined to a timber block though, but I did consider getting one of those 'renovator' all purpose oscillating tools with a metalic cutting blade- another thought was a strong but small rotary orbital sander.

    Looking very nice - I love the lines of that boat; so good to see another being built.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Beginning the dry fitting of bulkheads, trim pieces, risers and bench supports. The risers have been cut into pieces and fit between the frames. Because they were laminated in the forms at the time of planking, they fit perfectly- only needing proper bevels and the ubiquitous limber holes. The bulkheads have 4 coats of pigmented epoxy.





    Aft bench support. Everything is notched into the risers .


    Complex joints combining risers, bench supports and bulkhead. Very strong when glued.



    Forgot to show the completed aft watertight compartment. Make a handy shelf for storing tools and junk- have to watch that...

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Wanted to install the sheer clamps next- but first I need to make the transom frame. Complicated (for me) compound angles and cut-outs to receive deck beams for the aft deck. Full size pattern in the plans but I had to study them for some time before making the cuts.


    Ready to install. Getting the right placement and angle on the bumkin port extremely tricky- you will see later my remedial epoxy work that might appear to be ornamental, but is really just correcting a screw-up.


    Sheer clamps go in in one piece, not cut through like the risers. Notched to receive the frame heads.


    Frame heads are glued and screwed into these cut-outs.


    Test fitting. With glue, these joints are extremely strong. (recurring theme)


    How many clamps do you need? Wrong question. How many clamps do you HAVE?

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    I have to congratulate you mr Tyson first on your very tidy build and second on your sheer clamp to frame head join. On my build I have a similar setup and have been puzzling over a way to build it until I saw your method with the mortises underneath the clamp. Bravo

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Sheer clamps permanently installed. These, together with the glued-in bulkheads make the hull incredibly stiff.


    Inside edge of the sheer clamps are all planed vertical to receive the coaming later.


    Photo of the glue joint at the point where a frame head is mortised into the sheer clamp.


    Angled slots cut in sheer clamp to receive deck beams for the aft deck. At first glance, these would appear to significantly weaken the sheer clamp- until you realize that they will be filled with deck beam ends and epoxy- and a plywood deck with a teak overlay will tie the whole arrangement together.


    Same for the fore deck beam

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    I hate to ask this question, knowing how guys love a technical argument... Any engineer types want to look back on this page to my construction of the centerboard and tell me if I can stand on it to right this boat from a capsize? The board is 1" thick mahogany with 5/16" holes drilled through for the 1/4-20 stainless thru-bolts epoxy potted in place. It is about 17" wide. Of course I know that one should never stand on the far lower end and bounce on it- but how careful will I need to be?
    Last edited by dktyson; 10-07-2013 at 10:33 AM.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Sorry if this has been asked before, but are you going to glass the exterior?
    As for standing on the centerboard, I suppose if your foot was on the board at keel level, it would be OK.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by dktyson View Post
    I hate to ask this question, knowing how guys love a technical argument... Any engineer types want to look back on this page to my construction of the centerboard and tell me if I can stand on it to right this boat from a capsize? The board is 1" thick mahogany with 5/15" holes drilled through for the 1/4-20 stainless thru-bolts epoxy potted in place. It is about 17" wide. Of course I know that one should never stand on the far lower end and bounce on it- but how careful will I need to be?
    Only one way to find out Kent. Clamp it to your bench and the stand on it! But you make a good point. Notching is never desireable and the bolts holes could definitely compromise the strength of the board. However, I'm pretty sure it will be fine.

    I can't recall if Ted Cody used bolts in his centreboard, but when he capsized I think he used the board as a lever and it seemed to hold up just fine. Actually, the bigger problem in a capsize is the board housing itself and not able to be used as a lever. But, seriously, clamp the board to your bench and put some pressure on it to see how much it bends. If it breaks, I'll make you another one.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    I guess you meant 5/16 holes?
    I would think your ok as the holes are at the middle third of the board, whistling the main stress is in the outer third of the board thickness. have you space for another layer of glass cloth? Or better still unidirectional fibers going up and down the board.
    James

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    I have to congratulate you mr Tyson first on your very tidy build and second on your sheer clamp to frame head join. On my build I have a similar setup and have been puzzling over a way to build it until I saw your method with the mortises underneath the clamp. Bravo
    Thanks. Following the instructions of the designer...

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    Only one way to find out Kent. Clamp it to your bench and the stand on it! But you make a good point. Notching is never desireable and the bolts holes could definitely compromise the strength of the board. However, I'm pretty sure it will be fine.

    I can't recall if Ted Cody used bolts in his centreboard, but when he capsized I think he used the board as a lever and it seemed to hold up just fine. Actually, the bigger problem in a capsize is the board housing itself and not able to be used as a lever. But, seriously, clamp the board to your bench and put some pressure on it to see how much it bends. If it breaks, I'll make you another one.
    All my concerns are laid to rest. The key seems to be to not let a gorilla dance on the centerboard- or not capsize. I appreciate your offer Don- would this be a bad time to tell you I weigh 400 lbs?

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Sorry if this has been asked before, but are you going to glass the exterior?
    As for standing on the centerboard, I suppose if your foot was on the board at keel level, it would be OK.
    I will be glassing the exterior Rich. It's optional, but I like the idea of the hard shell. Actually I will be doing that within the next month and will probably be up to current time with my postings.

  32. #102
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by dktyson View Post
    All my concerns are laid to rest. The key seems to be to not let a gorilla dance on the centerboard- or not capsize. I appreciate your offer Don- would this be a bad time to tell you I weigh 400 lbs?
    400 lbs! No need for ballast then.

    Seriously, try testing the board on the bench just so you can get a feel for it's resistance to bending. I would be really interested in seeing what comes of it. This would be a good time to get your wife involved in the building process.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    400 lbs! No need for ballast then.

    Seriously, try testing the board on the bench just so you can get a feel for it's resistance to bending. I would be really interested in seeing what comes of it. This would be a good time to get your wife involved in the building process.
    Ok Don. I'll schedule some time in the lab for materials testing. I won't be inclined to "test to failure" so you shouldn't have to make me a new board.
    Last edited by dktyson; 10-07-2013 at 08:52 PM.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesh View Post
    I guess you meant 5/16 holes?
    I would think your ok as the holes are at the middle third of the board, whistling the main stress is in the outer third of the board thickness. have you space for another layer of glass cloth? Or better still unidirectional fibers going up and down the board.
    James
    Oops, I don't know where 5/15" came from. Not really room for glass cloth, but I agree that would strengthen it quite a bit.

  35. #105
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    Default Re: Building the D18 Myst - 18' Beach Yawl


    Really wanted a change of pace at this point, so I laminated up a blank of white ash to make the bowsprit. I used Ash because I wanted extra strength to avoid needing whisker stays- ok actually I used Ash because I had some around and hadn't bought the Sitka spruce for the spars yet.


    Cut the square to an octagon. The bowsprit is tapered and I wanted to create the taper while cutting the corners off. I miscalculated, hence the unequal sides on my octagon out at the narrow end. It all worked out with extra shaping and aggravation.


    The butt end is left square for the attachment to the samson post.


    A rudimentary wood lathe using a right angle drill. Not solid or centered enough to use a tool on the wood, but it worked pretty well with a wood rasp.




    I hot glued a block to the base. A bolt sticking out of the block allows it to be held in the drill chuck. Next time I will remember to leave the spar blank long enough to eliminate the glued-on block. I managed to shape the bowsprit without any major equipment failures or injury. Don't try this at home.

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