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Thread: Florida Beg-Meil

  1. #386
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    Default Don't know much geometry....

    I had to brush up on how to make a spar gauge and found a nice little write up on "Traditional Maritime Skills," a project out the UK that is preserving skills and traditions. They have an online learning section for traditional boat building skills that has videos and write ups on some useful topics - See more at: http://www.boat-building.org/learn-s....leMvd92H.dpuf

    Who said that we'd never use geometry?

    Procedure

    The aim for this square piece of wood is to make it into a round mast. This is done by removing the 4 corners, resulting in 8 sides, and then removing those 8 corners and so on.
    Each step brings it closer to a round shape.
    The important outcome of this process is that all the sides' lengths are equal, this is where Pythagoras' theorem comes into play. Pythagoras' theorem states that in any right angled triangle, the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares whose sides are the two sides that meet at a right angle. So the Pythagorean equation can be written:
    a2 + b2 = c2


    To create an octagon section from a square, it is necessary to plane or cut the 4 right angle triangles off. Due to this relationship, we can use Pythagoras outlined above to calculate the ratio between the sides of the triangle, square and the octagon.



    From the above diagram, it is possible to see that side a and b are equal and side c is not only the hypotenuse of the triangle but also the sides of the octagon. This highlights the relationship between the sides and enables a spar gauge to be designed.

    To find c, the equation can be rearranged to:
    c = √( a2 + b2)
    If you give a value of 1 to sides a and b (a and b are the same length as the corner angles are 45, 90 and 45), c can be calculated as being:
    c = √( 12 + 12)
    c = √( 1 + 1)
    c = √2
    c = 1.41
    So the relationship between sides can be described by the ratio 1:1.41:1. If the spacing between the outer pins and inner scribes on a spar gauge uses this ratio, it will mark out the octagon within the 4-sided shape.
    As long as the outer pins are pressed against the side of the mast, this ratio will be transferred to a tapered or straight mast as the spar gauge is drawn along the timber. Ideally the spar gauge needs to be at an angle of 45 to the mast, as a different angle will affect the ratio. For this reason you will require a different size spar gauge for different diameters of masts, however, the spar gauge will do a range of spar sizes within reason.
    Once these corners have been removed to create an octagonal mast, it is necessary to remove these corners. It would be possible to make a spar gauge for this purpose, the ratio in this case would be 0.4005 : 0.199 : 0.4005 between the various components of the spar gauge.
    Once you have made your spar gauge with its wooden or metal outer guide pins and the inner scribes (these could be pencils, metal spikes or even screws), you will be ready to mark up your spar.
    The benefit of the gauge is that while the outer pins are pressed against the side of the mast, that ratio (1:1.41:1) will always happen and this is true for both tapered and straight masts. This removes any unnecessary calculations, marking outs, etc.
    So place the spar gauge on the piece of wood, twist it so the guide pins have made contact with sides and draw it along making sure that the scribes (in this case screws) are marking the timber. To make the line easier to see, a pencil could be run down them. The lines give the edges of the corners which must be removed to make the octagonal shape required.
    Measuring the distance from the edge to the line at different points along the mast demonstrates ratio at work. As the width changes due to the taper, the distance from the edge to the line also changes and a range of 14mm to 21mm was seen.
    Rotate the mast and repeat the process for each side.
    - See more at: http://www.boat-building.org/learn-s....BKTiCol1.dpuf



  2. #387
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    There are two sentences from the Traditional Maritime webpage that seem important but are not entirely helpful with specifics: "Ideally the spar gauge needs to be at an angle of 45 to the mast, as a different angle will affect the ratio. For this reason you will require a different size spar gauge for different diameters of masts, however, the spar gauge will do a range of spar sizes within reason." So I know the ratio 1:1.41:1, but what actual dimensions shall I use? Vivier has a nice rule of thumb that is helpful to determine what dimensions to use to get the spar gauge at about 45 degrees for any given mast size.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    So based on this approach and my mast at 78mm, I plan to make a spar gauge like this:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Clearly this is not to scale, and I never claimed to be a good draftsman (although I may be the last generation that actually studied a tiny bit of drafting by hand in high school Industrial Arts aka "shop class." I don't think that stuff even exists any more, sadly. Don't get me started on today's lack of learning to actually problem solve and build something in reality, apart from the virtual world of screens and devices that is seemingly manufactured for our whims but mainly is trying to fuel consumerism.....but I digress.)

    I'll stop philosophizing and get to creating the spar gauge and post a few pics when done. Recall it was stated "however, the spar gauge will do a range of spar sizes within reason." It will be interesting to see just what the range of dimensions is "within reason." Let's see if this first one, built to the dimensions above for the main mast, is accurate enough to mark the 58 mm spars, or if I will have to make another one. We'll see.....

    Thanks for following along, and apologies in advance if all this is obvious to the community. I like to post, when I can, more than just pics of progress but a few things that show some of the learning curve that a new builder goes through. I hope it is helpful to someone.

    Jason
    Last edited by JasonD; 02-21-2017 at 08:58 AM.

  3. #388
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    I will give it a test run later.....it seems to work well, creating lines that will result in an equal-sided octogon.
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    and of course many projects beget other projects, so I had to finish up the little holder for the dowel plate:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  4. #389
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Clearly this is not to scale, and I never claimed to be a good draftsman (although I may be the last generation that actually studied a tiny bit of drafting by hand in high school Industrial Arts aka "shop class." I don't think that stuff even exists any more, sadly. Don't get me started on today's lack of learning to actually problem solve and build something in reality, apart from the virtual world of screens and devices that is seemingly manufactured for our whims but mainly is trying to fuel consumerism.....but I digress.)

    I could not agree more with you. My wife is a teacher and I am currently an instructor in the navy where I see the repercussions of what you are talking about on a daily basis. Teachers are hamstrung up here and are about to take the government to court on the issue to try and revert our education system back to the way it was. We need to start producing young adults again that can think on their feet and deal with a bit of adversity.

    I also took industrial arts btw and I think I use the skills I learned their on a weekly basis.

    Now on to the good stuff. I for one appreciate your detailed posts. As you know I rely on what you have learned and apply it to what I do. I find it interesting how different people tackle the same or similar problems to get the same outcome. I am frankyl impressed at how fast you guys work, I see your posts and wonder what the heck I am doing in the shop with all of my time

    Anyway keep up the great work and the posts.

    B

  5. #390
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Nice looking spar gauge. Hefty!

    i ended up removing one pencil and marking one side at a time. It was hard to keep both pencils on the wood and unbroken at the same time. I found that they get dull and break very quickly.

    I've been following for a while-admire your build and sense of humor.

    Kenny
    "Oh my god, Triscuits are, like, the best." L.F Herreshoff, The Compleat Cruiser

  6. #391
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by minuteman View Post
    Nice looking spar gauge. Hefty!

    i ended up removing one pencil and marking one side at a time. It was hard to keep both pencils on the wood and unbroken at the same time. I found that they get dull and break very quickly.

    I've been following for a while-admire your build and sense of humor.

    Kenny
    Thanks Kenny, very kind of you to say. I appreciate your following along and commenting.

    I did the same with my gauge, just used one pencil....worked a lot better and faster that way.

    Jason

  7. #392
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by billsan View Post

    I could not agree more with you. My wife is a teacher and I am currently an instructor in the navy where I see the repercussions of what you are talking about on a daily basis. Teachers are hamstrung up here and are about to take the government to court on the issue to try and revert our education system back to the way it was. We need to start producing young adults again that can think on their feet and deal with a bit of adversity.

    Yes, I see it too all the time; I just hope I am teaching my kids the right stuff!

    Quote Originally Posted by billsan View Post

    Now on to the good stuff. I for one appreciate your detailed posts. As you know I rely on what you have learned and apply it to what I do. I find it interesting how different people tackle the same or similar problems to get the same outcome. I am frankyl impressed at how fast you guys work, I see your posts and wonder what the heck I am doing in the shop with all of my time

    Anyway keep up the great work and the posts.
    Thanks very much Bill, I appreciate hearing that. Recording the build process is much more gratifying knowing that others can make us of the info. I know I really liked reading John Hartmann's Ilur build thread and it helped me a great deal.

  8. #393
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Other obligations and threatening raindrops kept me from finishing the octagon, but I got 2 sides done and half way through the third.

    Before all of these shots I cut the spar to exact length and then planed in the taper at each end; I didn't incorporate the tapers in the milling of the stock, and these tapers are minor and were easy to create with power and hand plane. Also I had to knock out three little spar rests out of the cypress offcuts.

    Then, mark the lines with the spar gauge.....
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Now its time to remove some material! This little guys sits unused on the shelf most years, but it sure does a great job hogging off the bulk of the material quickly.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Until it is time to fine tune with the trusty hand plane:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I'll tackle the rest soon, and then it will be on to 16-sided and sanding.
    Last edited by JasonD; 02-23-2017 at 10:48 PM.

  9. #394
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    A quick update: The mast is now round, and need the chocks for the standing rigging. Work continues on that, plus the boom and the gaff.

    Meanwhile, I was gifted a big chunk of time on Saturday and I applied the second coat of Interlux Perfection paint. So, that's 2 coats of epoxy, 3 coats of primer (epoxy prime-kote), and two coats of the Perfection 2-part paint. Think that's enough? I keep referring to as the freakin' hard candy shell like on an M&M.

    Now, on to the decks!

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  10. #395
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    Default My scarfing jig....

    is a sharp plane, a pencil, and pass or two of sandpaper:

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  11. #396
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    the deck of the Beg-Meil is in four pieces, requiring scarfs. My approach, recommended by Vivier is to fit the foredeck and make up scarfs there, then fit the aft deck and make up scarfs there. Attach for and aft to boat. Double-check scarf joints, then the midship side decks are put on - if all goes to plan, with aligned scarf joints. Here is the first one completed.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  12. #397
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    Default Coamings for the Florida Beg-Meil

    Current adventure is to make the coamings.

    The decks when laid down are not perfectly aligned with the coaming backing and its angle, so to get everything in one plane and a fair curve takes a few steps with a jig saw, rasps and spokeshaves. Maybe someone knows how to do this effectively with a router, but without the ability to pivot to the correct angle, or some crazy custom bit, I just couldn't conceive of how the router would work. (plus I absolutely hate routers....super dangerous loud sawdust throwing machines that have the ability in the wrong hands to absolutely wreck a project with a seemingly unfixable error.)


    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Of course, all those bumpy little epoxy craggy hills over the screws need to be flattened out with a rasp or file (my preferred method, it seems to be quickest.) Then the jig saw run along the inside edge following the backing boards.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Then rasps and spokeshave to get it just right.
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by JasonD; 04-29-2017 at 08:12 PM.

  13. #398
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    So, now that we have an angle and shape, it is time to make a pattern. Of all the pieces, this is the one where Vivier's normal very specific guidance is missing. Like, all it says is the timber stock is 14 x 65 x 3600 mm or something. So, I didn't want to even touch the very long piece of sapele until I knew exactly what shape to make. (Calling around, driving to the lumber yard far away, jamming a 15' board in a honda CRV, etc. etc. - although fun once, not something I want to repeat due to a mistake.) So, time to make a pattern - glad I kept the one spare "oops" planking stock I had....in served as a perfect base for the pattern.

    Pattern on the right, sapele on the left.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Now, these coamings are 14 mm, so relatively springy and bendable, but they did not want to go all the way into the curve without pressure enough to make me nervous. If I snap it, then it is hours in the moaning chair, moaning, deliberating between scarfing it or driving all around to lumber yards again....and then spending the hours getting more stock (because of course that is what I would do...but I would still have to debate it in my head for hours: "well maybe the scarf would look ok...."

    So, time for a shave and hot towel (ok, the shave already done, getting the coamings to 14 mm.) It's not the full steam sauna treatment, but for this purpose it works just great.
    1) get a sense of where the bend is iffy
    2) pour boiling water on that portion and a bit more
    3) wrap it in a towel and pour on more boiling water
    4) immediately clamp it up
    0) oh yeah, before all this get clamps setup etc.

    [IMG][IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Its not in absolute final shape and fit, of course, but after the hot towel treatment and clamping up for 24 hours, it'll take that curve up towards the bow every time without making me fear that dreaded pop/snap noise when a bunch of fibers break all at once.

  14. #399
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Other obligations and threatening raindrops kept me from finishing the octagon, but I got 2 sides done and half way through the third.

    Before all of these shots I cut the spar to exact length and then planed in the taper at each end; I didn't incorporate the tapers in the milling of the stock, and these tapers are minor and were easy to create with power and hand plane. Also I had to knock out three little spar rests out of the cypress offcuts.

    Then, mark the lines with the spar gauge.....
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Now its time to remove some material! This little guys sits unused on the shelf most years, but it sure does a great job hogging off the bulk of the material quickly.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Until it is time to fine tune with the trusty hand plane:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I'll tackle the rest soon, and then it will be on to 16-sided and sanding.
    luv'n the photo of the plane balanced on the spar over the concrete drive... every thread needs a little drama.


    fun thread, thanks for sharing.

  15. #400
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    LOL! Like this picture, I am sure, it appears much more dramatic than it actually was. In fact, if you look very very closely, you may see the safety line attached to the Lie Nielsen....

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    luv'n the photo of the plane balanced on the spar over the concrete drive... every thread needs a little drama.


    fun thread, thanks for sharing.

  16. #401
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Coamings!

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  17. #402
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    I still need to finish the joint at the bow where the two coamings come together is a relatively tricky (for me, anyway) compound angle. Also, I've made my coamings a bit higher than what Vivier has drawn. I will reduce them a bit more, and round over the edge, but I don't think mine will get as low as the designer seems to dictate.

    What would you do? How low to go?

  18. #403
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Going for this look and functionality:

    [IMG]image-1 by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]jada-beautiful by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  19. #404
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    But there are examples of lower coamings on Vivier's webpage - http://vivierboats.com/albumsen/Trai...i_1/index.html

  20. #405
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    time to get back to boat building. to get inspired, I've been enjoying some pictures of the workmanship at Skol Ar Mor - http://www.skolarmor.fr and https://www.flickr.com/photos/skolarmor/albums. Here's a pic of their dinghy Matonnat, built in 2015-2016. If only my joint joining the two pieces of coaming could look as nice......we'll see what I can do.

    [IMG]DSC_0202 by Skol Ar Mor, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Mise l'eau 2 - Launching 2 by Skol Ar Mor, on Flickr[/IMG]

  21. #406
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    The higher coamings will be better for a backrest but you'll have to raise the oarlock sockets and perhaps sit on a cushion to raise yourself up a bit on the seat to compensate.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  22. #407
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Ok, I bit the bullet and glued up the coaming joint. Not as perfect as I would have liked, but when all is said and done I think it will look just fine. Wow the bending and clamping for all the work on coamings was tough.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  23. #408
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Yes, for this joint I used TB III - hoping for a better glue line. Don't worry, it is a TB I bottle, but it really is TB III.

  24. #409
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    Thumbs up Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Your masterpiece is coming together nicely Jason .

    Great craftsmanship and attention to detail.

  25. #410
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by Wet Feet View Post
    Your masterpiece is coming together nicely Jason .

    Great craftsmanship and attention to detail.
    Thanks for those kind words, and for following along. It's been a long journey building 1-2 hours per week, but a fun journey to be sure!

  26. #411
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    I'm working on the trim piece (don't know if there is a specific name) that runs up the centerline of the boat on the decks, fore and aft. I suppose traditionally this would be a covering board, covering the seam of a canvas deck; or reinforcing where the mast meets the deck (which it does on my boat)? In any case, while making this piece I had a couple of thoughts on my development as a builder.

    1) first, while milling up the pieces of sapele I realized that my eye is much more critical about grain pattern, potential defects, and heartwood/sapwood, etc. I had to mill up about 5 or 6 pieces to get the three I needed. When I started all this, wood was wood and it was all pretty much the same. Now I'm looking at grain, how it is sawn, what part of the tree it comes from, etc. etc.

    2) second, I really like the use of patterns. For irregular shapes, curves, etc., it always pays to make a pattern first; plenty of little plywood scraps around to do so.... Especially when you only have 1 or a few pieces of nice timber and can't screw it up.

    3) and I am amazed at the new world of planes, spokeshaves, rasps, etc. that allow me to fit any funky shape needed. Prior to this, if the machine couldn't make the joint, it couldn't be made in my world. The hand tool work opened a whole new world for me.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by JasonD; 06-12-2017 at 02:02 PM.

  27. #412
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    I paid a nominal sum to have a pro with a laser cutter cut out my centerboard.....money well spent, as cutting this with a cutoff wheel would have been far less than ideal. So, now I have my centerboard but it needs shaped a bit more and edges eased, it needs a center pin to pivot, and some sort of coating (I am thinking hot dipped galvanized). Although the artistic dirt, scale, rust pattern looks pretty cool.....

    This 100+ lb. board adds ballast and can ease righting the boat if there is ever a capsize.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  28. #413
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    And now I start on the deck veneer...

    First, I trimmed the excess ply: first roughly with a jigsaw, then with a router flush trim bit, and finally a block plane.

    Then, I secured blocks where the rub rail will eventually go; these are used for leverage in the next step.

    I ripped strips of sapele for the "covering board" outside strip; to get the shape, I doused in boiling water and then clamped against the blocks. They needed to be weighted down to prevent twisting up and out - thus the battery and lead in yoghurt containers. Once these have had some time to relax into shape, I will prepare the joints and get ready for the glue down. In the mean-time, I am putting some teak through the thickness planer to get it ready for the remainder of the deck veneer.

    You can never have enough clamps.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Regarding the edge of the deck and the "leverage blocks", I think I will fill screw holes with epoxy and then cover the whole edge with 'glass tape and epoxy (after coating the plywood edge several times with neat epoxy.) This will nicely seal the end grain of the deck, which can be problematic. Then I'll cover that with the rub-rail.
    Last edited by JasonD; 06-17-2017 at 03:58 PM.

  29. #414
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Getting the starboard side ready for the covering boards veneer.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Also, I took off the clamps from one of the port side strips and although it springs back some, it bends nice and easily into the curve now.

  30. #415
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    Default steel coating for centerboard?

    I'm looking for experienced advice on coating the centerboard. Galvanizing the steel centerboard is doable, but involves driving to Tampa, $$ out the door, waiting for it to get done, etc etc. Coating it with epoxy mixed with graphite can be done right here right now, using up materials I already have. Is that foolish? What says the forum?

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  31. #416
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    Default Re: steel coating for centerboard?

    It looks like some good discussion was had about this very topic in another thread in the Tools and Materials section. Thanks Jay and Andrew! At least I have another option....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    The most effective coating for steel, outside of hot dip galvanize, is a Mil spec priming paint known as "DevconZ". This is an extremely high zinc content paint that works amazingly well in protecting steel from rust. A house down the street from me was built of steel that is painted using Devecon Z as a primer. In over fifty years of exposure to the marine environment it has never displayed even the slightest amount of rust. This is a cold galvanizing compound that is 95% pure zinc.
    It is much cheaper than hot dip and just as effective. I recommend using the brush system of application rather than spray cans. Used as a primer, it then can be top coated with epoxy paint.
    http://www.devcon.com/techinfo/115.pdf
    Jay
    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    So Jay I think you would've seen a centreboard or three in your time? Do you think I should just galvanise it and not worry about the interaction between it and copper coating on hull. Certainly the easiest and toughest method? That Devcon paint is zinc rich anyway and the mess of applying it versus just drop off the board and pick it up after gal. The board weighs maybe 150# so painting it could be difficult.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I have actually seen boards fall out that had their pivot pins eaten up in very short times as well as boards that became perforated like Swiss Cheese after short time submersion. Certainly hot dip galvanize is the best way to go if you are willing to take the time to really do a top grade job. Measuring the potential of the set up with a micro scale multimeter once the copper is in place would be a good idea. Often one can get by without any zinc plates connected to the Fe cathode source. Devcon Z is a cheaper and less involved method of getting protection if you are not equiped to take care of transporting the board to and from the hot dip service.
    Jay

  32. #417
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Sunny Florida
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Getting the joints ready on the "covering board" veneers, prior to glue down:

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    the three tools pictured above are my favorite for small detail work. Looks like it is time for a cleaning, however!

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  33. #418
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    Aug 2013
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Hope this isn't boring everyone, but I'm psyched to have finished the joints on the port side. The curviest part of the sheer was the toughest to work out, and I end up using a shorter piece rather than forcing a longer piece into that curve.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    The same piece on the starboard side needs completed, and then time to prep the deck for glue down. I was perusing The Gougeon Brothers on Boatbuilding and found the following:
    "Prepare the deck plywood surface in the normal fashionwith a minimum of two coats of WEST SYSTEM epoxyprior to the application of the teak strips. This is doneto provide a good moisture barrier directly underneaththe teak surface. This will protect the deck plywoodsurface and supporting framework from any moistureattack. Wash the cured epoxy surface with water andsand the epoxy surface lightly in preparation forbonding the teak strips to the deck surface. "

    So after the final joint is done, time to break out the epoxy and get to it.

  34. #419
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    99

    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Hope this isn't boring everyone, but I'm psyched to have finished the joints on the port side...
    Not at all, Jason, I'm following along with joy! Very nice work. I assume these "covering boards" are just being shaped, not glued down yet? (following along, but not paying enough attention ;-)

    Cheers,
    Dale

  35. #420
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by dsimonson View Post
    Not at all, Jason, I'm following along with joy! Very nice work. I assume these "covering boards" are just being shaped, not glued down yet? (following along, but not paying enough attention ;-)

    Cheers,
    Dale

    Thanks Dale! Yes, this stage is to douse them with boiling water and bend them into shape (In my mind I call it "Yeah, I can't bend it dry but I can get away with bending it without a steam box and all that hassle" bending.) After the initial bend and rest, I then cut the joints. Once all is looking right, I will begin the glue-up process: coat decks with 2-3 coats epoxy, then glue down the individual boards. After that, on to the teak strips! Thanks again for following along and the kind words. -Jason

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