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Thread: Florida Beg-Meil

  1. #596
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    Dec 2018
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    Wilmington, NC, USA
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    I just binged through your incredible build from the beginning. Absolutely awe inspiring. Thank you so much for sharing it all.
    You're getting close. Hopefully this will be the October you keep mentioning. Maybe October will come early this year.

    Sam

  2. #597
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Cargo View Post
    I just binged through your incredible build from the beginning. Absolutely awe inspiring. Thank you so much for sharing it all.
    You're getting close. Hopefully this will be the October you keep mentioning. Maybe October will come early this year.

    Sam
    Sam,

    Thanks for your kind words! I appreciate you following along, and I'm glad you enjoyed the thread. I'm going to keep plugging away!

    Jason

  3. #598
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Some work on the boom lately:

    From 4 sided, to 32-sided and nearly round -
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    The tools of the trade: spar gauge, power planer, and smooth plane.
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    How does the spare gauge work, you ask?

  4. #599
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Well, here is some info I found helpful

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    I used the same spar gauge for the boom as used for the gaff. It was created based on Vivier's nice math (.72D and .3D) that creates it perfectly for whatever diameter is needed. For those who want to know the math behind it, there is a nice little write up on "Traditional Maritime Skills," a project out the UK that is preserving skills and traditions. They have an online learning section for traditional boat building skills that has videos and write ups on some useful topics - See more at: http://www.boat-building.org/learn-s....leMvd92H.dpuf

    Who said that we'd never use geometry?

    Procedure

    The aim for this square piece of wood is to make it into a round mast. This is done by removing the 4 corners, resulting in 8 sides, and then removing those 8 corners and so on.
    Each step brings it closer to a round shape.
    The important outcome of this process is that all the sides' lengths are equal, this is where Pythagoras' theorem comes into play. Pythagoras' theorem states that in any right angled triangle, the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares whose sides are the two sides that meet at a right angle. So the Pythagorean equation can be written:
    a2 + b2 = c2


    To create an octagon section from a square, it is necessary to plane or cut the 4 right angle triangles off. Due to this relationship, we can use Pythagoras outlined above to calculate the ratio between the sides of the triangle, square and the octagon.



    From the above diagram, it is possible to see that side a and b are equal and side c is not only the hypotenuse of the triangle but also the sides of the octagon. This highlights the relationship between the sides and enables a spar gauge to be designed.

    To find c, the equation can be rearranged to:
    c = √( a2 + b2)
    If you give a value of 1 to sides a and b (a and b are the same length as the corner angles are 45, 90 and 45), c can be calculated as being:
    c = √( 12 + 12)
    c = √( 1 + 1)
    c = √2
    c = 1.41
    So the relationship between sides can be described by the ratio 1:1.41:1. If the spacing between the outer pins and inner scribes on a spar gauge uses this ratio, it will mark out the octagon within the 4-sided shape.
    As long as the outer pins are pressed against the side of the mast, this ratio will be transferred to a tapered or straight mast as the spar gauge is drawn along the timber. Ideally the spar gauge needs to be at an angle of 45 to the mast, as a different angle will affect the ratio. For this reason you will require a different size spar gauge for different diameters of masts, however, the spar gauge will do a range of spar sizes within reason.
    Once these corners have been removed to create an octagonal mast, it is necessary to remove these corners. It would be possible to make a spar gauge for this purpose, the ratio in this case would be 0.4005 : 0.199 : 0.4005 between the various components of the spar gauge.
    Once you have made your spar gauge with its wooden or metal outer guide pins and the inner scribes (these could be pencils, metal spikes or even screws), you will be ready to mark up your spar.
    The benefit of the gauge is that while the outer pins are pressed against the side of the mast, that ratio (1:1.41:1) will always happen and this is true for both tapered and straight masts. This removes any unnecessary calculations, marking outs, etc.
    So place the spar gauge on the piece of wood, twist it so the guide pins have made contact with sides and draw it along making sure that the scribes (in this case screws) are marking the timber. To make the line easier to see, a pencil could be run down them. The lines give the edges of the corners which must be removed to make the octagonal shape required.
    Measuring the distance from the edge to the line at different points along the mast demonstrates ratio at work. As the width changes due to the taper, the distance from the edge to the line also changes and a range of 14mm to 21mm was seen.
    Rotate the mast and repeat the process for each side.
    - See more at: http://www.boat-building.org/learn-s....BKTiCol1.dpuf


    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Vivier has a nice rule of thumb that is helpful to determine what dimensions to use to get the spar gauge at about 45 degrees for any given mast size.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Thanks for following along, and apologies in advance if all this is obvious to the community. I like to post, when I can, more than just pics of progress but a few things that show some of the learning curve that a new builder goes through. I hope it is helpful to someone.

    Jason
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Some work on the boom lately:

    From 4 sided, to 32-sided and nearly round -
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    ...

  5. #600
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    The boom is now round (or round enough for me!) and sanded to 80 grit. To take a break from sanding, I fit the half-band, spike and matching collar. Final product like this (forgive the fact that the half-band is inserted upside down; trust me, it fits the right way!):
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    The steps I used were these -
    First, I used a small saw to cut across the grain to sever the fibers (ala knife-wall technique)
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Mark the desired diameter and use a chisel to remove the waste -
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Use a rasp to adjust the final fit -
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    One thing I have gotten much better at is marking a reference point on the items being fitted - in this case the tack ring on the bronze fitting and a marked "T" for top on the wood. I know this seems obvious, but in the early days I wondered why I was constantly chasing that perfect fit, and lo and behold, I was constantly changing the problem by putting whatever it was on a different, if if slightly different, way.

    Not too bad at all, I'll take it....although maybe I will fiddle with it a bit more to tighten it up a little more.
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by JasonD; 01-09-2019 at 03:04 PM.

  6. #601
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    The half-band and spike required drilling a hole for the spike and chiseling a small mortise for the square portion.
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by JasonD; 01-09-2019 at 03:01 PM.

  7. #602
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Milled up a few pieces of live oak for the reefing combs. Always gratifying to use wood that I harvested and dried myself. it is HARD and TOUGH, live oak...wow.

    From this:
    [IMG]IMG_0910 by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    To this:

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    For these:

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    btw, the first pic is of an excellent sawyer in central Florida:
    Last edited by JasonD; 01-09-2019 at 04:47 PM.

  8. #603
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    First pass and dry fit of one reefing comb:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  9. #604
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    And both fitted:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  10. #605
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    Aug 2013
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    Sunny Florida
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    A little work on the sculling oar tonight...

    First, a workout:
    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    to get the proscribed taper. This will be the inner thickness, and the edges of the blade are about 10 mm, so more taper from center to the edges later.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    A long way to go, but the rough outlines are in place.

  11. #606
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Found a small sap pocket at the end of the oar......adapt and overcome!

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  12. #607
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    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    Used the spar gauge again to mark if for 8 sided, then 16-, and 32-sided. I found that a curved spokeshave I have is nearly the same radius so it takes it even closer to round before sanding. Next, I marked the 10 mm thickness at the edge and started planing the taper from centerline to that marked edge, for the shape per Vivier's specification....

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    To the nearly final shape:

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Next steps are to shape the grip at the end, and then sand.
    Last edited by JasonD; 01-13-2019 at 09:35 PM.

  13. #608
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    Default Re: Florida Beg-Meil

    The handle grip at the end wasn't too hard. I had to take off 10 mm of material, so I placed some blue tape on a saw at 10 mm depth and sawed a kerf at the junction, as well as a few more to make chiseling easier. I used a compass to draw the desired diameter on the end and then whacked away most of the material with a chisel. Then some rasps and spokeshaves took it from there. I left a little swell in the end and it's a comfortable grip. Its all sanded to 80-grit, perhaps a bit more can get done during the upcoming week. The goal is to have oar, boom, gaff, and mast all ready at the same time before I break out the varnish again.

    [IMG]Untitled by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Last edited by JasonD; 01-13-2019 at 09:37 PM.

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