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Thread: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    16,053

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    I have an inexpensive wireless gps receiver that talks to my iPad. Range is about 30 feet an it works well. Even below deck.



    Edit;
    Compact, portable, Bluetooth-enabled WAAS GPS receiver.


    The XGPS150A Universal GPS Receiver with Bluetooth Wireless Technology is an outstanding option for anyone in search of reliable, ultra-precise, satellite-based position & movement info for their Bluetooth-enabled devices. It's also a lower cost alternative to Dual Electronics Corporation's XGPS170 model - great for non-flying activities or anyone who doesn't need ADS-B signal reception. The unit supports both NMEA and Apple protocols, enabling it to flawlessly integrate with your iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone, and most other Bluetooth-enabled devices. Since it's satellite-based, you'll have reliable WAAS GPS signal coverage from any location on earth - no need for Wi-Fi or 3G access! Its integral battery delivers up to 8.5 hours of continuous usage and can be recharged via the included USB cable or with the included 12-28V adapter unit. The 65-channel receiver updates its position at least once per second so you'll always have the absolute latest location info. Measures 2.2" x 0.8" x 2.2" and weighs just 1.8 oz. An informative, intuitive tool for 24/7 position info from your favorite electronic device.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,496

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Update -- I was given one of these as a gift. A Nekteck battery pack that can be plugged in or left in the sun to recharge. 10,000mAh. Haven't used it heavily or tested the advertised waterproof claims, but it hasn't disappointed yet. At least in theory, it more than triples the run time I can get out of the Tab A if I leave with both devices at full charge. With judicial use for navigation, that's easily 3 days, probably as much as 5. Add solar recharge time, and I should be able to stretch it out even more. The battery pack is as tall as the tablet but not as wide.

    -Dave

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    59,986

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I have an inexpensive wireless gps receiver that talks to my iPad. Range is about 30 feet an it works well. Even below deck.



    Edit;
    Compact, portable, Bluetooth-enabled WAAS GPS receiver.


    The XGPS150A Universal GPS Receiver with Bluetooth Wireless Technology is an outstanding option for anyone in search of reliable, ultra-precise, satellite-based position & movement info for their Bluetooth-enabled devices. It's also a lower cost alternative to Dual Electronics Corporation's XGPS170 model - great for non-flying activities or anyone who doesn't need ADS-B signal reception. The unit supports both NMEA and Apple protocols, enabling it to flawlessly integrate with your iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone, and most other Bluetooth-enabled devices. Since it's satellite-based, you'll have reliable WAAS GPS signal coverage from any location on earth - no need for Wi-Fi or 3G access! Its integral battery delivers up to 8.5 hours of continuous usage and can be recharged via the included USB cable or with the included 12-28V adapter unit. The 65-channel receiver updates its position at least once per second so you'll always have the absolute latest location info. Measures 2.2" x 0.8" x 2.2" and weighs just 1.8 oz. An informative, intuitive tool for 24/7 position info from your favorite electronic device.
    Bluetooth looks good, one less connection to corrode.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Auckland ,N.Z.
    Posts
    23,347

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Further to the above John B if you're there. How would a GPS dongle go as a solution to the cell tower GPS ?Something that could suddenly stop being helpful close off shore .

    http://www.expansys.com.au/globalsat...FYSXvAodtTkPjg

    I have something like that for the laptop on the boat Peter. It works fine down below. The laptop has open cpn charting as backup.
    Like I said earlier , my tablet is android and has gps in it so I don't know about linking a gps dongle in to one of those .I do know that each unit needs to be compatible with whatever hardware you have, I needed a specific gps for that laptop with win 10 for example.

    Tablet and phone screens are still just damn useless outside in the sun. I'm thinking of carrying a cardboard box or gimmicking up some sort of shadow box to put the thing in, I want to be able to look at google earth downloads on the tablet alongside the chartplotter, you can see the reefs and coral heads.
    Last edited by John B; 03-04-2017 at 03:34 AM.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    59,986

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Thanks John, Open CPN is what I'll load but it seems complicated to make everything talk to each other. '' I needed a specific gps for that laptop with win 10 for example.''

    You're right about trying to see the screen in full sun, something will have to be organised...... especially in an open boat!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Salem, MA
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Please don't laugh at the ignorance of this non-technophobe…. Does a tablet running a navigation/gps app need to be one that's non-wifi? My wife has an iPad that cannot communicate with the internet unless there's a wireless nearby. Would it work on a boat?
    Jeff
    There are all kinds of tablets with varying capabilities. I'm not familiar with all the various Apple products, but for sure if you are new to this, know that some Apple stuff says GPS but it's not real GPS it gives you an approximate location by triangulating to cell phone towers - that's just not okay if you expect to use it for boating. Be careful, easy to get tricked on this aspect (don't ask ).

    I do have a $100 Toshiba Windows-based 8" tablet ((without cellular phone capability --that does have a 'real' GPS sensor system built in)) using OpenCPN installed with all the NOAA free charts -- so I know that that combo works. But for me the touch screen is too small for easy manipulation.

    Not being a fan of small touch screens, I run the same OpenCPN on my large laptop for when I want to do detailed route planning -- these routes can then be loaded onto the tablet.

    But, always a but, I have a few Garmin chartplotter/GPS machines and ALWAYS have one of these on my boat. I still prefer the non-touch GPS with the traditional manual buttons for control -- so much easier for me anyway. And Garmin GPS are often available very cheap on CraigsList -- even with all the built in charts included.

    HTH,
    Last edited by tom151; 03-04-2017 at 04:20 AM.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cape Fear, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,686

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    GPS in iPhone or Ipad?
    Spoiler :: Ability to talk to cell tower => it has a real GPS
    **************************
    Story version. . . .
    It's a Really Good Question.
    I bought my first iPhone in 2008 and I had some amazing digital experiences using it before/during /after the Great Chesapeake Bay Schooner Race (s/v Rosemary Ruth) that year where we started and finished the trip in NYC. (Note: Captain Richard Hudson has since sailed to Brasil, Baffin Island, Greenland and then Circumnavigated N&S America via NW passage, Chilean inner passage , the South Shetlands in Antarctica and after S. Africa and Namibia he single handed St. Helena to Norfolk USA when there were some crew transportation problems. Whew!)
    Fast forward a decade . . . sprinkle on a couple wrinkles and 3 or 4 gray hairs . . . and today I have many old iDevices laying around and they all are the type that can talk to a cell tower and get an internet connection, which means they all have built in GPS.
    Note that the WiFi ONLY iDevices do NOT have GPS built in.
    Most of the more than a handful of GPS iDevices are NOT currently registered with a carrier (ATT, Verison, Sprint, T-Mobil, TelCel, etc) and so can only be used with WiFi internet. However they all still function perfectly well as mobile chart plotters. In fact we will have one or more of our boats chartering starting next summer and will be using the old iDevices running apps such iNavX, SEAiq Open, etc as extra throw away chart plotters. Some issues that the OLD Apple iDevices have is, they use an older version of IOS and that they must be registered with an Apple account in order to own/purchase/install Apps. That is unless one JailBreaks the device. Jailbreaking iDevices is something I have no experience with but seems very doable, especially if one is dealing with older devices with a vintage version of Apples IOS operating system, which is currently at version 10. A number of our old iDevices are stuck at IOS 5 or greater but still function, albeit the apps installed are older versions that will function with the older operating system.
    enjoy

    ************************************************
    ( http://ipadpilotnews.com/2015/12/ipad-real-gps/ )
    Does the iPad have a “real GPS” in it? December 28, 2015
    Google the phrase “does the iPad have a GPS” and prepare to be overwhelmed. More than five years after the iPad was introduced, lots of people are still confused about whether the tablet actually has a GPS in it. And if it does have a GPS, is it a “real” one? Let’s bust some myths and settle the issue once and for all.

    iPad with built-in GPS
    Is it a “real” GPS?
    First, some simple facts. Every iPad ever made has both WiFi and Bluetooth, two wireless technologies for connecting to nearby devices (in the case of Bluetooth) and the internet (in the case of WiFi). The only additional option is to add cellular service, originally called 3G and now called LTE for the latest models. This cellular option allows the iPad to connect to the internet anywhere your cell phone works, so if you want to check your email while driving down the interstate, you can do that (but it won’t work in flight).

    There’s more to the story, though. In addition to the cellular radio, the 3G/LTE models of the iPad also have a built-in GPS receiver. Apple calls this “assisted GPS,” which is probably where the confusion comes in. By assisted GPS, Apple means that the GPS receiver in the iPad can use nearby cell towers to provide a faster position lock (what engineers call “time to first fix”). Instead of starting up cold and searching for satellites, which can take up to a few minutes in some cases, the iPad knows right where to look. With a hot start like this, your iPad can find its position in just seconds.

    This is a handy feature if you’re trying to find your location on a map, especially if you’re in a big city where buildings can block GPS reception. But it’s important to note that the iPad does not require the cellular connection. In fact, you can purchase a 3G/LTE iPad, never sign up for service with Verizon or AT&T and still get very good GPS performance. If you want to test this, go to the Settings app and turn off Cellular Data, Bluetooth and WiFi. Even with all of its wireless radios off, the iPad will still show your position on ForeFlight or Garmin Pilot (again, assuming it’s a 3G/LTE model). And once you’re flying, your iPad will have an excellent view of the sky and should maintain good GPS accuracy.

    So “assisted GPS,” far from being a cheap version of GPS or an Apple marketing line, is actually a good thing. By using all the other sensors on the iPad, the GPS performance is improved. Make no mistake: the 3G/LTE iPad has a real GPS built-in.
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Gustavus, Alaska USA
    Posts
    164

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    This may have already been mentioned. I don't have any on the water use yet but I recently installed a Garmin plotter at the inside helm of my boat. The boat also has a steering/control station on the back deck. I hadn't known about a feature on the plotter before I bought it that creates a wifi connection for devices on the boat. I can stand on the back deck at the second station with my android tablet and view/control the Garmin plotter/sounder/radar with the tablet. It was a simple app download for the tablet and connection was easy. The interface is a little slower but works fine.
    Last edited by Fritz Koschmann; 03-04-2017 at 04:23 PM.

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Auckland ,N.Z.
    Posts
    23,347

    Default Re: useing a tablet as a chart plotter.

    Well, we held out for years but after attending a cruising communications workshop yesterday we've stopped fighting it and bought an Ipad . Everything seems to be easily adapted to them as opposed to android, especially the weather and satellite through predictwind and iridium go, so... there we go.
    Cellular ipad pro for the GPS, have my weather and google earth downloads working, may duplicate charting( already on a samsung tablet),we'll see. Yet to get the thing to connect to the sat device.

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