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Thread: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I have Underhill's drawings of 'Muirneag'; Isla is correct, they show a scarf at about 2:1 ratio "..to facilitate replacement of damaged timberheads..". Nothing in EJM's book. I'm still going to double most of them...belt, braces and string...!
    Thanks for the interest and kind words Isla, I'd love to bring Kate to the Portsoy festival when she's finished, and then possibly on to Lerwick where she was originally from.
    How come you have Underhill's drawings? Do you have a Zulu or just a keen interest in your native boats?

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    I have Underhill's drawings of 'Muirneag'; Isla is correct, they show a scarf at about 2:1 ratio "..to facilitate replacement of damaged timberheads..". Nothing in EJM's book. I'm still going to double most of them...belt, braces and string...!
    Thanks for the interest and kind words Isla, I'd love to bring Kate to the Portsoy festival when she's finished, and then possibly on to Lerwick where she was originally from.
    How come you have Underhill's drawings? Do you have a Zulu or just a keen interest in your native boats?
    I bought Underhill's plans because poor health (temporary I hope) is stopping me from doing heavy lifting, walking and sailing etc. which is stopping me from getting on with a Caledonia Yawl build. I thought I would build a model while I am recovering my fitness, and I wanted to build something from scratch, plank on frame, and relevant to this area. 'Muirneag' was built by the McIntosh yard at Buckie, which is just 15 miles away from where I live. Of course the yard is long gone, but I'm a frequent visitor to Buckie and they have a good fishing heritage group there, so 'Muirneag' seemed like an obvious choice. I realise now that I will probably be running marathons before I ever finish the model, but at least I will learn a lot about Zulus. Here are a couple of links to the McIntosh yard website and the Buckie and district Heritage Centre. You are most likely familiar with them through your own research, but other folk might like to take a keek. I look forward to seeing you in Portsoy (next year, no pressure ).
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  3. #73
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    With the last warmish days of a summer that seemed to hang on forever (mercifully), I managed to glass the cabin top. I used West epoxy resin, a lot more cost than polyester resin, but hopefully it will adhere better to the ply and last a lot longer. The cabin top is going to get a lot of footfall and abrasion.
    I cross-hatched/scored the surface of the ply with the corner of a chisel and cleaned it with thinners prior to laying the mat.

    IMG_0640.jpg


    The trim went on, and after filling a couple of small gaps between it and the glass, I re-glassed areas around the hatches, sanded the whole lot and painted the top with deck paint with an anti slip additive.


    IMG_0827.jpg

    IMG_0828.jpg

    IMG_0829.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:04 PM.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I then set about laying the hatch runners down. They are made up of two pieces of oak each as I didn't have any decent 2 x 2".

    IMG_0834.jpg


    The stainless strips are bolted through the runners, which in turn are bolted through the beams under the cabin top 4 times. Had to do huge amount of fitting up and adjusting to get them to line up parallel, both level and equal heights, snug on the ply, with stainless strips flat, and line up through the beams below, on a cambered and slightly concave surface. I only have a hand plane and a grindette, and don't mind admitting blaspheming somewhat getting them true.


    IMG_0835.jpg

    I put a piece of quadrant on the outer edges and one in between the two.

    IMG_0841.jpg


    Drilled some drainage holes just forward of the centre quadrant, and filled around all the glue edges in preparation for glassing. Mucho sandpapering.

    IMG_0842.jpg


    Once glassed and painted they kind of blended in. Most important work is invisible, that's my story anyway....

    IMG_0868.jpg


    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:11 PM.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I made the side pieces for the sliding hatch out of some reclaimed Iroko.

    IMG_0875.jpg


    I routered out a strip of HDPE and screwed it into a groove in the wood. This was then capped with another strip of stainless.


    IMG_0876.jpg

    The rake seems a little steep, and not of the period, but I wanted head room underneath, and I reckon it will not be so apparent when the planks go on.

    IMG_0877.jpg


    I couldn't find any more 1 1/2" Iroko in the shed, or actually in the whole of Sufflok for that matter, so I opted for a bit of cedar. I don't like mis-matches, so I'll probably stain it.


    IMG_0878.jpg

    Knocked it together in the workshop.....

    IMG_0880.jpg





    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:19 PM.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    ...and tweaked it presented up.

    IMG_0885.jpg

    Not sure of the species, but had a visit from this beautiful butterfly today..

    IMG_0874.jpg

    I put a board in to stop wind blown water finding its way in. That's my theory anyway.

    IMG_0956.jpg


    My neighbour Jeff, who has also kindly been supplying me with water (thanks Jeff!) let me pass the larch planks through his thicknesser. I then lapped them the same way as I did the for'ard hatch.
    I was wondering how I would be improving my method the second time around. As I cant possibly have got it perfect the first time I did this, I can only assume I am too stubborn or too stupid to learn, as I didn't change a thing. It did get made a lot quicker though, as is the way.

    IMG_0915.jpg


    Screwed and glued the planks down, I will caulk them and epoxy resin them. Does anyone know of an epoxy that is UV resistant?

    IMG_0959.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:28 PM.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    You can get Surf board resins that have more UV inhibitors than the average epoxy, but I wouldn't leave it on a cabin top without something else (good quality varnish) to help protect it. These resins are deigned for use on surf board and canoe sheathing, that gets short term UV exposure. Your hatch will get pretty much constant exposure, especially as it is facing the heavens.

    If you want to leave them bright, you might consider just going with straight varnish, witch you will find is easier to strip off when it starts to degrade. I think if you have a look at Haabet's thread, you might find the comments on the finish he put on his deck planking interesting, I think he used a very long lasting polyurethane varnish of some sort.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks for the advice Jonathon...
    The varnish Haabet used on his decks was Ceolan, otherwise called Extreem-Coat, which is sold as a ten year varnish. It may be the way to go as I'm trying to avoid an annual re-varnish ritual. Failing that I might just paint them, but they look so good varnished it would be a shame not to try some canny coating first. I'll also investigate surf board resins as I have a couple friends in Cornwall that are shapers. Good idea, thanks!

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Nice work, I've enjoyed catching up on the early work and your continuation of it. Are you still in touch with the previous owner?
    Larks

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  10. #80
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks for your comments Larks. Yes I'm still in touch with Graham, he comes by for a cup of coffee now and again and wonders why it's all taking so long, why Kate isn't in the water yet, and why she isn't hoofing along with him at the helm! He reminds me that back in the day, 80' zulus were built in 8 weeks. 8 Weeks! I counter remind him that he took ten years to get thus far!
    *sigh*

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Great work! Discovered the thread this morning, and that lead to a slow start at work . Impressive that someone would even take on a project looking as bad as this did in the first place. It`s amazing how few vessels from the "Golden age" of North sea fisheries have survived, considering how numerous they were.

    You are doing wonderful work bringing her back to life. This thread actually made me happy. Thank you!

    Remember, 80' boats were not built in 8 weeks by a single man doing it on his spare time.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks for the kind words Haabet, I've really enjoyed reading your thread too!
    Yes it's amazing to look at the picture of her when Kate was found, sunk and rotting. It was because of Grahams knowledge of historic boats that he recognized the lines of a zulu lying in the mud, and that impelled him to restore her in the first place; his should be the glory! I did the same 'salvage' project with a 16' clinker boat from the 1930's, which taught me how much work was involved doing something like this.

    ..And yes I am always amazed that so many sailors don't even know what a zulu is, given that they were so numerous in the North Sea. I don't think they were very easy to engine given the rake of the stern post, even though many of the originals had either steam or diesel engines. The added competition of larger modern diesel engined boats spelled their demise.

    sailplan EJM.jpg


    Can't wait to get the sails up!
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:37 PM.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Finished the hatch today with a coat or two of ordinary UV varnish. I had to get something on quickly otherwise it would soon start to mildew.

    IMG_0997.jpg


    I'll get some better varnish in due course.

    IMG_0999.jpg


    Really pleased with the Siberian larch planks, such close grain.

    IMG_1014.jpg


    So much for staining, I tried it on the lighter board at the back of the hatch and it looked terrible. There are 7 different woods in this! Planks are Siberian larch, sides are Iroko, front and back boards are cedar, trim is mahoghany, the washboard is made of larch and pine with oak trim.

    IMG_1005.jpg


    Found a nice old galvy latch for the lock. Very nice to finally have a lockable boat, even though there's not much to steal on it apart from my tools....

    IMG_1006.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:42 PM.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    The washboard has two oak handles that swivel releasing the board backwards. This is such a simple design, yet it took almost a day to come up with, as it has to resist massive water pressure if I ship a wave, yet has to be easily releasable, rainproof, and thief-proof. Simplicity is complicated and difficult to achieve eh?

    I'd quite like to make a washboard out of lexan too, to let light in when shut.

    IMG_1008.jpg

    Also put a couple of portholes in the aft cabin.

    Here counter-sinking the backing plate to take the bronze bolts.

    IMG_1010.jpg

    IMG_1011.jpg

    IMG_1012.jpg




    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:48 PM.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by Haabet View Post

    Remember, 80' boats were not built in 8 weeks by a single man doing it on his spare time.
    A perfect lead in to asking him to give you a hand!
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Ok, Haabet, please would you stop messing around with that Colin Archer, and devote some attention and sweat to MY BOAT ??!!!

    Seriously though, if anyone is around Suffolk, Essex or Norfolk and roughly knows what they are doing, I could use you!
    ooooooh yes indeedy.
    Board, lodgings and rum catered for. Plein air toilets (with shared shovel), a kitchen with a view, all the sawdust you can eat.

    Quals required:
    -sense of humour/irony.
    -the ability to think thrice before striking your chisel/committing your saw.
    -low sense of personal hygiene.
    -intuition for making stuff that functions given perhaps limited knowledge of 19th century sailing craft design but when you look it up in a book it's exactly what they would have done.
    -Ability to hoover around spiders.
    -The abilty to ignore a screaming back/shoulder/forearm/rumbling tummy/ and just keep going and get the job done, damn it.
    -Must have a love for glue, varnish, grease, paint, mastic bitumen or unidentified sticky stuff, (often all of the aformentioned) in their hair, clothes and general apparel, and be able to look the lady behind the counter at the village shop in the eye while buying some teabags without showing the least insecurity or even care about it generally. (see req. 3)
    -Stamina, and passion in a relaxed and erudite manner, yet strangely 'laisser faire' and nonchalant, but talented and highly focussed personnel will be given preference.
    -No Radio 4 'Archers' fans, or Canadians. Sorry.

    PM me, I'll make you famous.
    Last edited by lupussonic; 11-30-2013 at 05:01 AM.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Ok, Haabet, please would you stop messing around with that Colin Archer, and devote some attention and sweat to MY BOAT ??!!!
    First of all, I don't think Mr. Archer was involved in my boat in any way ;-)

    Second, you have my attention, though not undivided I'm afraid.

    As for the sweat, the best I can do for now is to send you one of my T-shirts after a good day of work. Somebody put an ocean between us. I suspect her name is Plate Tectonics.


    Of to work! The boat is calling.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Haabet, my apologies, I was confusing you with Svaap, as you both have the double 'a' in your name. It had nothing to do with several bottles of beer on a Friday night.
    My offer still stands... 8)
    Have a great day!

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    This thread has been a great read and a boost in motivation for me ..... I'm determined to rebuild my zulu class, she's been seriously bastardised

    On another note - do you please by any chance have the plans still for the boat? I'm trying to find some for mine, but they seem to have disappeared from the face of the earth at some point, and the boat I have there is only 3 surviving now, and not one of us has the plans for them!!!!

    Regarding your list for help - isn't that most people who decide to live on a boat? lol

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sway View Post
    This thread has been a great read and a boost in motivation for me ..... I'm determined to rebuild my zulu class, she's been seriously bastardised

    On another note - do you please by any chance have the plans still for the boat? I'm trying to find some for mine, but they seem to have disappeared from the face of the earth at some point, and the boat I have there is only 3 surviving now, and not one of us has the plans for them!!!!

    Regarding your list for help - isn't that most people who decide to live on a boat? lol
    Sarah,
    Now that I have seen Maid out of the water I can tell you that she is not a Zulu. She is an untypical canoe sterned MFV, unusual in that she has that raking stem and no bulwarks.
    I doubt that there were ever plans published. Her designer will have produced a lines plan and table of scantlings, from which he will have calculated her stability, a table of offsets from which the yard will have built her and a structural profile positioning the engine, shaft line and rudder. The yard might not even have needed a general arrangement if she were to be set up for a method of fishing that they were used to.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Sarah,
    Now that I have seen Maid out of the water I can tell you that she is not a Zulu. She is an untypical canoe sterned MFV, unusual in that she has that raking stem and no bulwarks.
    I doubt that there were ever plans published. Her designer will have produced a lines plan and table of scantlings, from which he will have calculated her stability, a table of offsets from which the yard will have built her and a structural profile positioning the engine, shaft line and rudder. The yard might not even have needed a general arrangement if she were to be set up for a method of fishing that they were used to.
    I know shes not a zulu zulu.....only paperwork she has says shes a zulu class....no idea why though! Designer is long gone unfortunately....even the company that took her over have drawn a blank - Maybe I should just strip her all back and build her properly, then she can be a Sarah class ....... lol

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sway View Post
    I know shes not a zulu zulu.....only paperwork she has says shes a zulu class....no idea why though! Designer is long gone unfortunately....even the company that took her over have drawn a blank - Maybe I should just strip her all back and build her properly, then she can be a Sarah class ....... lol
    Ah I see.
    A bit like calling a grp copy of a four strake plywood centreboard sloop a Crabber. At least Maid is built properly
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  23. #93
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Have replied to this on my thread, don't want to hijack this one with talk of mine

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I recently met Roger Seward who was involved with the original salvage and initial re-build; he dug out some photos he took of Kate being salvaged...



    Day1.jpg

    Day2.jpg

    Day3.jpg


    And I had this email from Don Windley, also involved in the salvage and rebuild, who was put in touch with me by Gavin Atkin of Intheboatshed fame. Thank you Gavin.

    Hello Martin

    Veiwing the progress of Kates restoration has bought back so many memories of my time in England ( 22 Years ) and particularly of Basses Dock Woodbridge where I found and finished the restoration of Good Intent. Of the people who lived there on their boats of their dreams and poject boat restorations, of the cameraderie, hard work and help we all gave to each other to get these fine old sailing vessels back in sailing trim, and the good times that followed with many classic boat festivals . Old gaffers races and smack racing at Mersea Island, of the beer, the girls, the music, and the skippers who kept these old boats alive. You will have all this to enjoy with Kate as we did then. I was in my early forties when I finished Good Intent and lived aboard as you are now Martin.


    We found Kate during a classic boat festival in Lowestoft. I had taken my clinker tender up the inner harbour for a row and seen Kate at high water submerged among the bones of the big Lowestoft smacks. I returned to the festival and told Graham Brewster and John Lawrence that I thought I had found the wreck of a Zulu. We returned at low water to get a good look at her stern which was well into the mud. Yes it was possibly a Zulu! The plan was hatched over many beers in the Anchor Pub, none of us had any money but it was not going to stop us ! Mad yes of course we were, but nothing ever gets achieved if you dont go for it !


    Research was done, and the wreck of Kate purchased from Smudger Smith for three pounds. Graham, John, and myself scratched the bottom of our pockets and raised one pound each. With the help of Paul Sheader who owned the nearest boat yard we spent many months travelling from Woodbridge to Lowestoft in my old Range Rover, me, Graham and John Lawrence . We dug, we patched, we tingled, and dug out more mud, eels and several years of corruption, until one snowy freezing cold night with the help of begged borrowed and stolen pumping equipment, we got Kate to float and manouvered her to a position alongside the river bank where we would be able to get at her with a crane.

    With money kindly donated to us from 'Freinds of Kate' and a little of our own meagre resources we were able to hire a truck and a crane. With Kate still in a difficult position we had to refloat her and get the strops under her. The Crane was at maximum reach, and with the cranes alarm bells ringing the driver inched her towards the bank, and then hearts in mouths, up and on to the river bank . SAVED!


    Trips to timber yards ensued to beg for oak, and to Dicks saw to get it cut, we tyhen hauled two big baulks of pitch pine from the navy yard at Shotley Point on an unlicensed huge trailer behind the Range Rover to Dicks saw. We put in the new stem post (donated oak ) hollowing the aft edge of the new stern post (donated oak) with John Lawrence and me using shoulder planes and grindettes. We then set about scarfing in the aft section of the keel ( the original keel was worn away from many groundings.)

    All great memories, all such huge effort, and rewarding now to see that the project is being completed. Much credit must go to Graham for continuing the restoration after I returned to New Zealand. Please give Graham my regards and John Lawrence too.

    I have attached a scan of a photo of a model I built of the Kate as I saw her finished . This model I built in my kitchen of the rented cottage I shared with Alison my partner at the time . The cottage was beside the Orwell river and the picture is taken of the model sailing on the Orwell. I think I left the model with Graham in his workshop in the woods at Nacton along with a large framed photo of Good Intent.
    I hope you are able to find this model, it is yours to keep , its not to scale but close to proportions.
    I will dig deep into stored books and photos , there are more somewhere.

    Keep up the good work Martin , all the best , I may get the opportunity to sail with you one day on Kate...

    Kindest regards
    Don Windley
    New Zealand.


    Below is the photo of the model Kate Don made.

    Zulu Model kate sailing on the orwell River.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 12:55 PM.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Here are some drawings for the blocks I intend to make, I would welcome any comments... The ones here are for an 8" block with single, double and triple sheaves. I have tried to standardise the wood dimensions as I can't be using numerous sizes. I also have drawings for 6" and 4" blocks, also in single, double and triple sheave; all sizes use the same stainless flat strap for the bracket, the same size axle/pin, and the same thickness sheave. They are for 16-18mm rope. They're not super fancy shiny posh blocks, but should be tough and workman-like and last a while. I intend to make twice as many as I need, including spares, and sell the surplus to claw back some money, so they need to be good enough to sell to similar block-brained people... 8)

    8" single..


    IMG_1295.jpg


    8" double..

    IMG_1294.jpg

    8"triple..

    IMG_1293.jpg

    The final rounded profile differs a bit with each drawing, but I'll hopefully arrive at a standard shape when they start rolling off the production line.

    I will make a few and test them to destruction to get an idea of strength, but in the mean time please post comments, if I've overlooked something major I'd like to know before churning them out en masse!

    Thanks!
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 01:05 PM.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    To make some prototypes, I trimmed up a sheet of HDPE (high density poly-ethylene) and planed the strips down to 19mm.

    IMG_1220.jpg


    Made a jig to drill dead centre on each one.

    IMG_1229.jpg


    Roughed out and turned the throat into each one.

    IMG_1233.jpg


    I planed the elm down to 19mm and milled it to required width.

    IMG_1237.jpg


    Routered out the channel for the strap and the curved recess out of the end pieces. I cold bent the 3mm stainless strap around a jig I made.

    IMG_1240.jpg




    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 01:13 PM.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    The first one..glued with sepmaroc expanding glue and nailed with copper boat nails with the heads sanded off. I drilled right through the whole thing, popped in the axle and forstenered in the discs. All 316.

    IMG_1250.jpg

    As usual a prototype throws up some issues. I need to work to about 1mm accuracy to get these to look (and be) right; this one was a bit wobbly. One thing that has been pointed out to me is that the end pieces are at cross grain to the cheeks; with a constant soaking the glue face may come unstuck as the wood swells in different directions. Anyone know if old blocks were always made with the grain in the same direction or doesn't it matter? It shouldn't take much stress at that join, but all the same I'd appreciate some input!

    IMG_1251.jpg


    It amazed me how many individual actions are needed to make these, and I'll have to work out a canny mass production sequence in order to batch-make these..I'm on my way though. Any thoughts are appreciated!
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 01:15 PM.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    You really took on a large project but it really shows your skills!

    I Photoshopped a couple photos for you.
    at least now you have them in digital form with adjustments (just drag them to your desktop).
    The damage to you photos is stopped.

    I also liked this photo and wanted to fix it for you.

    Compare to the original below.
    Last edited by donald branscom; 02-18-2014 at 03:33 PM.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Any idea what this timber is?


    Thanks for looking....!
    Zulu wood? LOL ...I don't know.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Zebra wood?- some looks a bit like that.

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post





    The final rounded profile differs a bit with each drawing, but I'll hopefully arrive at a standard shape when they start rolling off the production line.

    I will make a few and test them to destruction to get an idea of strength, but in the mean time please post comments, if I've overlooked something major I'd like to know before churning them out en masse!

    Thanks!
    If you curve the top edge of the lower spacer, to wrap it round the bottom of the sheave, you can make the block a bit shorter. Only a small change, but with a lot of blocks will save materiel and look less clunky. I would also suggest curving the top of the beckett to a half round, rather than using right angle bends.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #102
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    Default

    [QUOTE=lupussonic;4069833]As usual a prototype throws up some issues. I need to work to about 1mm accuracy to get these to look (and be) right; this one was a bit wobbly. One thing that has been pointed out to me is that the end pieces are at cross grain to the cheeks; with a constant soaking the glue face may come unstuck as the wood swells in different directions. Anyone know if old blocks were always made with the grain in the same direction or doesn't it matter? It shouldn't take much stress at that join, but all the same I'd appreciate some input!


    It amazed me how many individual actions are needed to make these, and I'll have to work out a canny mass production sequence in order to batch-make these..I'm on my way though. Any thoughts are appreciated.

    Last time I took my mast down I had a vintage block from the topping lift in my hands. The end pieces were cross grain and they had become loose. They were held together by the rivets. Hindsigt told me it was a bit of a risky situation. However it was a rope stropped block, so if it failed it would have jammed, not fallen apart.

    Now I am making replacements just like you but I use Epoxy to put them together so I am certain the won't fall apart. Does away the need of rivets too. I can put in rivets any time later if I want to anyway. I could not find your brand of glue on the internet, but as it is an expanding one I assume it is PU based. If that is the case consider the fact that PU based glues do not hold up well in wet environments. After a couple of years they might start to peal apart. Keep an eye out for that.

    As for serial production The single ones I make from two planks with the end pieces sandwiched in between. I saw them into individual blocks afterwards. (Sorry Nick, no material savings. )



    There is some more information about this on the duckworks homepage.
    http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/02/...odenblocks.htm

    I do it a bit different, to get the grain in the cheecks right.

    [IMG]https://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com%2F-re1fHWojyY8%2FUwbPQVex4fI%2FAAAAAAAAAvo%2FHlE5UeU6 CKk%2Fs1600%2F20140221_132626.jpg&container=blogger&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F*[/IMG]

    I shape them by chiseling in the oval shape and go around the cheecks with a roundoff bit in the router.

    These had a expoxy treatment Don Kuryoku style and are ready for their first coat of two pack PU varnish.


    Like you I have some with a cleat, but I use the Dutch style Thumb cleat. It keeps the lead to the sheave right.

  33. #103
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    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks for the photoshopping Donald!

    Peerie Maa...Point taken about the half-round becket. I think they'll all turn out round, but I have had trouble with halyard blocks where the falls of rope twist so much you can't get the yard up to where it should be because of friction in the twisted rope; on a dipping lugger each tack is a haul up, and twist often sets in. I was thinking of a clevis pin going through the square profile to allow a spinning shackle above, but perhaps that was foggy thinking, a standard swivel with a shackle pin at one end would do. Thanks for the comments.

    Lutine.. thank you for the advice and images! Below is the glue I used. It is indeed PU, sort of the new Balcotan. Details here.. http://www.flints.co.uk/pdffiles/sem...id_v_usage.pdf

    collano-semparoc-800grm-marine-wood-glue-500ml-3649-p.jpg



    I've seen the Duckworths site, nice work... How do your axle pins stay in? Are they welded to the round disc? I couldn't see the image of the cheeks that you tried to post, any chance of a second go?

    Many thanks again all of you!
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-11-2018 at 01:19 PM.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    [QUOTE=Lutine;4072642]
    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    As usual a prototype throws up some issues. I need to work to about 1mm accuracy to get these to look (and be) right; this one was a bit wobbly. One thing that has been pointed out to me is that the end pieces are at cross grain to the cheeks; with a constant soaking the glue face may come unstuck as the wood swells in different directions. Anyone know if old blocks were always made with the grain in the same direction or doesn't it matter? It shouldn't take much stress at that join, but all the same I'd appreciate some input!
    Old blocks always had the grain running along the longest dimension for strength. Differential movement was not a problem because they were riveted together sans glue.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  35. #105
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    Default

    Attempt two:

    [IMG]https://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com%2F-ts06Kccaex0%2FUwbtVHNJrBI%2FAAAAAAAAAwU%2FdYFVO5kv DaA%2Fs1600%2F20140221_153255.jpg&container=blogger&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F*[/IMG]

    With the iron strapped blocks the pin stays in with a 5ct coin on one side and the with the wood. I bore a 5mm hole through, which I bore out to 8 mm for all but the last cm. So on one side i have a 5mm hole to puch out the pin if required. On the other side I close it with the coin which is screwed in place, flush with the surface. I chose this way to spare on parts, thus less chance for failure.

    With the rope stropped blocks its just the rope to keep the pin in place which is the summum of simplicity.

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