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Thread: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

  1. #1
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    Default Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Hello!

    On March 15th 2012, in a wood near the North bank of the river Orwell in Suffolk, I shook a mans hand and took over the rebuild of a 42' Zulu. It was a magical day, the blackthorn blossom was out and a bright sunny haze hung in the air, signalling the end of a long winter.

    I had been to see Kate a year before, met her re-builder and his girlfriend and looked around and inside her with enthusiasm and admiration, but he told me she wasn't for sale. She was you see his 'Taj Mahal', his swansong, the last boat he would ever work on and sail, and having spent the last ten years devoted to her rebuild, he had to see her finished and one day take her helm himself. Who could blame him? He had fastened everyone of her 3000+ copper nails himself (backed them too), had planed over 1000 feet of larch planks, cut, fitted, planed, fastened, sanded and painted her entire new deck, deck beams, stringers....the list was endless. Money simply wasn't any kind of recompense for ten years graft, even if it did go some way towards the expense of it. So after I finished complimenting his work, admiring her lines, the uniqueness of his vision, and sheer dogged stubbornness that he must have needed to get her thus far, I pleaded with him to contact me if he changed his mind, and went on my way, quietly cursing between clenched teeth.

    A year later he phoned me, and asked me if I would come and see him, which I duly did. I met him and his girlfriend at the yard, they were painting her hull. He told me that he had fallen ill and could not complete her, and was now worried sick that she would once more be forgotten and slowly rot away again, and all his work would have been for nothing. I told him that I would pay him what he asked, and not haggle in the slightest. He looked at me with a twinkly eye from under his Breton cap and just said "Goan 'en"...
    .....my hand met his....

    So this then is a thread of two parts, I will try to tell the story from the beginning, starting in 1997, when Kate was resurrected, her reconstruction up to when I bought her, and follow on from there with my own efforts. I should say that there was a group of people involved in reconstructing her at the beginning, and an organization set up in her name to raise funds etc. Although that was before I was even aware of the boat, I will try to acknowledge the people involved.

    Earliest photo I have, 1965 Shetland Isles.

    IMG_0439.jpg


    Kate was built by Hays and Co. Ltd yard in Lerwick, Shetland Isles, in 1910. She is 42' on deck, 13'6" beam, and around 5'6" draft. She is, as far as I know, the only clinker Zulu class left in the world, and one of perhaps 10 Zulus of any type of construction. She was larch planked on oak frames, with a pine deck and a traditional lug ketch rig. She was built for herring drifting from the Shetlands to the South East of England. She was renamed 'Sunbeam' in 1946 and fished as an MFV minus her rig.

    I intend to take her back to a lug ketch with a small auxiliary engine. My self imposed remit is to keep her as traditional as is practically possible as regards the rig. I have a fair amount of experience with 40' luggers, and really like the speed and simplicity of the lug rig. I do not however have a crew of 6 burly experienced Shetlanders to hand, so may tweak/adapt to suit for shorter handed sailing. My intention is to use her for serious, hopefully global, offshore cruising. She is also my home, and so I will be finishing her off while living on her. As for myself, although I have never taken on a project of this size, I have rebuilt several smaller traditional boats. But I am not a professional, and welcome constructive criticism and advice. Kate is on the Historic Ships Register UK, and although I am not interested in recreating a museum piece, I feel the responsibility of owning a small part of our maritime heritage and want to do the right thing where I can.

    A news letter from 'The friends of Kate' group..



    As found in Lowestoft 1997.



    Kate was hauled out after much digging, pumping, blood sweat and tears..



    And brought by low-loader 50 miles to a farm near Ipswich.

    IMG_0443.jpg



    Her present site for the last 15 years has been a concrete hard standing with a leaky shed nearby.
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 08:41 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Larch timber was felled in Wales and transported down to Suffolk for the planks.

    IMG_0446.jpg

    IMG_0447.jpg


    The first thing that was done was to fit a new oak stem and dead-woods. Sorry about the damaged photo.


    IMG_0450.jpg

    About 15 feet of keel was scarfed into the original at the aft end. The join where her rudder now sits has been boxed in galvanized steel, more on that later. Again, photo damaged.

    IMG_0449.jpg


    Planking commenced starting at the garboard working upwards. Red lead paint was used extensively throughout the rebuild. The planks have iron dumps into the frames, and are copper nailed/riveted onto themselves.


    IMG_0453.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 05:13 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    IMG_0454.jpg


    IMG_0455.jpg

    View looking aft from inside. At the same time the planking was going on, the deck beams were being built. A new bilge stringer was also put in, something which she did not originally have.


    IMG_0458.jpg

    View looking aft. All of the deck frame is of English oak. Most of the frames were sound, even after 90 years, about ten were replaced and none of them are sistered. Not sure whose head that is....

    IMG_0457.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 05:24 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Graham Brewster, the main carpenter and driving force behind the project, steaming and smokin'.

    IMG_0438.jpg


    One of Grahams other boats 'Pembeth', a Colne smack, presently moored in Brightlingsea.

    IMG_0440.jpg


    All of the frames had their top sections replaced with new oak where they penetrate the deck to form low stanchions.


    IMG_0459.jpg

    View of the aft end. The stanchions will be cut down to 6 inches high. The Zulus only had a capping rail at either end which only ran for about 6 feet from stem and stern, most of the stanchions were exposed but well painted. I suppose there wasn't much need for one with such low sides, needed for net hauling. This does leave the bulwarks very low, and the crew exposed. Still it will keep me on my toes, I'm reticent to put a fence around her, although I will all around the helm position. That really is exposed.


    IMG_0456.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 05:38 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Old photo of crew lowering the mast of an 80 footer to ease drag once the drift nets had been shot. You can see the low uncapped stanchions. The masts of the large Zulus were often as long as the boat and had 6 to 8 feet circumference. Note the number of rope falls. Try doing that 150 miles East of the Shetland Isles at dusk in a force 6!


    mast.jpg

    Zulus in harbor circa 1890. A very common sight along the East coast back then.


    b71ee597497da105fd49e9eca60434d0--zulu-fishing-boats.jpg

    The families and friends would follow the fleet on land to gut, salt and barrel the fish. It was used domestically and exported to Europe, and herring was a vital mainstay in the UK's economy.

    Just to put it in perspective....I believe this photo to be of Great Yarmouth around 1890. You can see the masts in the background.

    02.jpg


    Imagine the amount of workers involved, not just the men and women who gutted the fish, but the people who made the staves, the coopers themselves, the salt sellers, the brokers, the food suppliers, the transporters of the barrels, the train workers who transported the people to work and the barrels to the markets, the rope-makers, sail-makers, the boat builders themselves, the inn keepers, the list would have been near endless. This was a massive industry, and kept the UK economy going for hundreds of years, culminating at it's peak at the end of the 19th century. The Zulu herring drifter was the state of the art working sailing vessel at that time before steam and later diesel replaced them.


    A girl pours brine into a cran, or barrel, of herring.


    01.JPG

    Fish anyone?
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 05:51 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    your timberheads are not safe, unless they have doublers i cant see, the deck could part from the hull, you can bolt doublers from under the deckhead to 500 below each scarf, 6 bolts in each,
    those are not shipwrights scarfs
    who is surveying this work, i advise you if you want this advice to get all the work done on this boat checked by a surveyor,
    find out what glue was used, and fastening examples,
    and you can put 2, 30 x 100 new beamshelves 1 above the other below the present ones, thru bolted to each frame,
    with knees at stem and sternpost, throat 120, arms 400, 70 thick,these can be solid or laminated ,bolted,
    was this boat ever called Fjara
    Last edited by peter radclyffe; 08-21-2013 at 03:36 PM.
    Boat Designer. Boatbuilder

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Peter, thanks for the reply, I will consider doubling up on the scarfed frames, I get what you mean. There was a surveyor with a workshop right next to the boat when this work was done ten years ago, and I heard he was always looking at the work done. But I myself have not seen him since I bought her. It's a good point and I will look into it.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Exciting stuff, just saw the resurrected thread too, I was going to say what I said in 2005

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Wow.. there's a boat to love. If she's going to carry the original big dipping lug you'll need a good crew.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    A view of the port quarter...all the deck beams are 3 inch oak. The beamshelves are 2" x 5" larch.


    IMG_0460.jpg

    The larch planking was seamed with cotton tape and lagged in tar.



    16.JPG

    10.JPG

    Deck planks start to go down....this view looking aft.

    IMG_0467.jpg


    The longitudinal sides of the cabin top are 2 1/2" larch. You can see the central bulkhead is in. The cross members of the cover are still as low and a pain in the back side as they were here, I never got round to changing that..


    01.JPG
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 06:13 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    View towards the bow and foremast slot. The deck was planked in much narrower strips than a conventional fishing boat would have been to reduce shrinkage gaps.


    IMG_0462.jpg

    All planks are 2 1/4 inch thick, caulked with oakum and payed with Jeffry's tar.


    View of stern planking.


    IMG_0470.jpg


    Port side looking aft.

    IMG_0471.jpg

    Lodging knees port side up near the bow.

    IMG_0472.jpg

    Starboard quarter..

    IMG_0465.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 06:23 PM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    This is the foremast box, the partners are 3 inch oak, and the box 2", everything stainless studded together. There will be a huge baulk fitted right across the boat that sits on, and supports the mast box, kind of like a thwart.


    IMG_0482.jpg

    The plan is for two heavy plates to go across the box holding the mast in place, adjusted for rake with wedges. The plates will bolt on approx 12" below the top and 12" above the bottom of the mast box, onto stud that runs fore and aft right through the side cheeks, you can see the end of one peeping out of the triangular piece on the starboard side. I will cut a slot for the mast tenon as I do not want to put all my trust in these steel plates.


    IMG_0484.jpg

    IMG_0481.jpg

    IMG_0485.jpg


    View looking up at the partners..

    IMG_0483.jpg

    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 06:40 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    View of aft end...planking complete on port side..


    IMG_0491.jpg


    Not far to go on the starboard side either.


    IMG_0492.jpg




    IMG_0494.jpg

    View of complete port side..

    IMG_0490.jpg

    IMG_0476.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 06:56 PM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    View of port side of stern.

    IMG_0473.jpg


    Starboard side has last plank fitted.....

    IMG_0474.jpg




    ...and when the bulwark plank was fitted.


    IMG_0499.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 07:21 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    View of twin shaft logs. Graham rebuilt her as she was found, and had planned to drive her with a single 60 HP engine running hydraulic pumps and motors coupled to the shafts. I am not a fan of hydraulic drives; despite the advantages they are inherently much more fallible to breakdown than direct drive, and have large power losses in the system. And it would cost around 10,000 for the kit! I do however like the idea of twin engines for redundancy...but as she is going back to sail, I will probably just fit a single engine and wing her. Either way, these logs look too bluff and I think the inside edge particularly will create a lot of suction/turbulence. I am thinking of moving the logs inboard and having 'P' brackets on the outside with folding prop (s).


    IMG_0500.jpg

    What do you think?
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 07:23 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Ok, so that brings us up to the time when I bought her, from now on all the posts will be work that I have done on her.

    Two shots of her as of 15th March 2012.

    IMG_2551.jpg


    IMG_2600.jpg


    The first thing I set to work on was to get a wood stove installed. I was sleeping on her right from the start and this was a priority...

    I converted a small steel gas locker I had...


    IMG_0965.jpg

    Put in some baffle plates, an ash pan and a grate...

    IMG_0985.jpg


    Hinged the doors and made a vent lever, added a 'cap', and later I made the legs longer.

    IMG_2975.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 07:36 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    The flue went on...

    IMG_2973.jpg

    I built a surround for the stove, lined it in vermiculite, and clad it in copper, which reflects the heat as long as it's shiny.

    06.JPG


    The crank in the flue was a b*stard to weld as it was so thin. I wanted the stove central to get maximum space in the cabin, but the flue would have been on the center line, where mizzen staysail attachments are going, so I had to offset it.

    After that I laid the entire sole in oak T n G.
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 07:50 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I decided to concentrate on one compartment at a time, starting with the one I decided to sleep/live in.
    So berths and air-tightness for warmth seemed to be the next logical steps..

    Port side varnished and painted....

    IMG_4378.jpg


    I copied the sliding berth design from Chapelle's book, but made the individual slats narrower to give narrower gaps between them.
    This shot shows two longitudinal beams both supported by bearer blocks for and aft on the bulkheads.

    IMG_5426.jpg

    The second set extended.

    IMG_5429.jpg


    I rot proofed them, but decided not to varnish. I might linseed them instead.

    IMG_5431.jpg


    Wonderful to lean over in the morning, stoke the stove and doze while the coffee heats up....
    I later installed a divider to ensure the blankets cannot end up on the stove.

    I have to say, when I arrived at the boat, it was freezing, and the coach house roof was non-existent, no stove, no sole, no roof. I covered the gaps above the best I could with dust sheets in the vain hope of retaining some body heat inside, and swaddled myself in as many blankets as I could find. Some mornings there was ice inside the compartment where I was attempting to sleep. When I laid the sole, I was ecstatic to have a cold flat surface to sleep on, and no longer be on the beams. When I eventually had a wood stove, and a berth, and a mattress, although it took me about an hour to unbend myself to be completely flat, I was so happy I cried.

    The pleasures of a simple cushion eh?
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-09-2018 at 08:05 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    With sleeping arrangements sorted for the time being, I set to work on the deck.

    IMG_3481.jpg

    I filled in tiny gaps in the seam caulking, and painted the planks and stanchions. I also put an extra layer of flexible mastic where the stanchions protrude, and then painted the covering boards.

    02.JPG


    I put in about 4 deck prisms, and put oak quadrant between the deck and the coach house sides.

    deck light.jpg

    IMG_3848.jpg


    Before she goes in the water I'll give her one more layer of deck paint with finings in for grip. It didn't seem worth doing at the time as I would only wear it off (or it would wear through my knees) while working on her.
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 01:51 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I put in three short fore and aft beams into the cabin top beams, and made two boxes to fit between them for skylight hatches. I decided to depart from traditional skylights, as, being a lugger, the crew is often dancing around this part of the deck trying to catch the end of the yard. I also wanted to have a meaningful opening to be able to pass bags etc through it.



    IMG_4365.jpg

    IMG_4364.jpg

    IMG_4376.jpg

    I laid this section of ply down onto the beams, and installed the hatches. They are made of ply, with bronze porthole rings set into them with toughened glass.

    IMG_5435.jpg

    I routered a recess into the top part of the box, and let in a strip of bronze into the lower part. The ply cover comes down right over the whole lot. This way, water has to get around 6 corners to enter the cabin.


    IMG_5440.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 01:01 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I put a piece of PVC on each skylight over the hinges, but I'm not sure how to fix the ends so that they dry underneath, but could allow a pole or an oar to be stored in between. It will become obvious in time I'm sure. The ply needs to be glassed first in any case.

    IMG_5437.jpg


    Result from inside. Phew, that only took three weeks...

    IMG_5442.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 01:02 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Gobsmacked.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks!

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Beautiful!

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Nice work, and good luck!

    Your wood stove worries me. Is that a damper in the flue? Sleeping in a small enclosed space with a homebuilt stove requires precautions for carbon monoxide poisoning. A CM detector at least.

    be careful.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Thanks for the replies and encouraging remarks...much appreciated!
    Jim, yes there is a damper in the flue. I have thought of installing a smoke detector or a carbon monoxide detector, but the stove 'chuffs' at start up quite a lot, so I always sleep with a skylight/porthole open if there is any smoke anyway. I might put one in that I can keep turned off initially until the stove settles down, then turn it on later. Is there a particular issue with flue dampers?

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    . Is there a particular issue with flue dampers?
    A stove that is airtight with the draft contol on the inlet air will operate with a somewhat negative pressure in the firebox, sucking the air in. Putting the damper on the chimney allows positive pressure to occur in the stove, with the possibility of fumes backing into the living space, either through leakage or opening the door.

    Keep the skylight open at the very least, and remember that you can't smell CO.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Shes a stunner and i look forward to seeing her back in her element, probably not as much as Graham.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Good comments about the damper on the flue pipe, .... not a good thing. As has been said, with a flue damper, when you close the damper there is a slight positive pressure that forms inside the stove , so fumes and CO tend to get 'pushed out' of the stove into the living area. With no damper, when you close down the draft control the stove will form a slight vacuum on the inside, so the stove is trying to 'suck' fresh air into it, and there is a 'reduced' issue of CO poisioning. ...... And yes, CO is completely colorless and odorless. --- Just this past weekend there were 2 - 3 people killed while aboard their boat on a lake in the central part of the sstates, due to generator CO fumes (one person survived & is in critical condition).

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    In truth I only use the damper very rarely at start up when I'm trying to get the stove to behave, then control it solely with the inlet.

    Any way, I found a pristine pair of 16' oars in the shed one day, not a single worm hole or bit of rot. They are pine, and will be very useful for maneuvering the boat around in harbor, or as a jury rudder. I stripped them down and linseeded them. Beauties eh?

    IMG_4339.jpg

    IMG_4337.jpg


    Re-leathered them too...

    IMG_4338.jpg


    A view of the shed. It houses 40 tonnes of wood, about 60 billion spider webs, various wood machines (some still work), Graham's collection of nautical junk spanning 50 years, which I'm sure may one day be useful, and all my tools. Delving around is like a form of archeology. It leaks like a sieve, and I love it.


    IMG_3850.jpg

    IMG_2970.jpg

    Around 2 tonnes of ballast will go in before launching in the form of cobblestones. A lot of the old boats around here used stones from the beach; I'll need several more tonnes to get her weighted properly.



    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-13-2018 at 07:57 PM.

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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Graham and I sized up the rudder one day, which basically is comprised of 4 strips of oak, two with scarfs to make them longer.


    IMG_3334.jpg

    I carved out two sections of the inner (fore-most) wooden post and beat two straps of stainless round the carved areas, then welded them tight and snug. These will act as bearings of a fashion, for a design (Grahams) that I have never seen before.

    IMG_3336.jpg


    Studding the wood together was very difficult, as I did not have a pillar drill that this size piece could fit under, and the trailing post tapers to about 1 1/4" ;getting a 30" 12 mm drill bit to land perfectly in the centre of it wasn't always possible. I therefore had to have at least 4 or 5 lengths of studding penetrate just two or three posts, not always the same ones, and of course once I had tightened up any two posts, the nut in the middle disappears and could not then be held with a spanner if it started turning! After 2 nights of twisting my brain, and a fair amount of red eyed swearing, I got it all together in a 'dry run' and then undid it all to move it to the rear of the boat, as I could not move it in one piece.


    IMG_3442.jpg

    IMG_3439.jpg

    I cut four oak shims and screwed them to the stern post, these will have two stainless 'U' brackets bolted to them, right through the stern post. The 'U' brackets were shaped by Murray at Classic Marine, Woodbridge (thanks Murray!) and give the rudder a 90 degree turn, lock to lock. The trailing edge of the stern post is slightly concave to let the rudder in.


    IMG_3443.jpg

    The rudder was studded up tight in a fury of flying spanners and hasty bolting, before the glue went off. There is a bronze turned bearing at the base of the stern post that the rudder will rest on, surrounded by poly-ethylene strips and grease for slip and galvanic isolation.
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 01:39 PM.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I made a stainless shoe for the rudder, and planed the whole thing fair.

    IMG_3469.jpg


    Made a cap for the top....


    IMG_3470.jpg

    And after much canny rope and pulley work, and much heaving, up she went. You can now see the 'U' brackets.


    IMG_3472.jpg

    I faired off the spacers/shims and gave it all a lick of primer. There will of course be a small amount of turbulence created by these spacers and the 'U' brackets, but a gudgeon and pintle set up also creates turbulence as there has to be a space between the stern post and the rudder blade for them. This set up leaves about 1/4" gap. As usual, compromise reigns supreme...


    IMG_3478.jpg

    There are some adjustments I would like to make.... I'd like to raise the angle of the shoe by about 10 degrees to avoid the ground when the keel is at rest, something I hadn't thought of at the time. I might as well put some straps around the blade for extra strength/longevity while it is out of the water and barnacle free, and I'm not convinced about the after-most profile, which I find a bit square, and not very aesthetic; the old zulu's had a rounder trailing edge, but as the most steering effect is provided by this part as opposed to the bottom part further forward,I might try it out first. It works out at about 19 feet square of surface area, and around 200 KG. It swings freely and very smoothly.




    Thanks for looking!
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 01:44 PM.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    4,518

    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Here's a drawing of the rudder of Muirnag, 80' LOD. The large Zulus all had flat wheels with worm gear actuating chains that pulled on a 'T' bar on the rudder stock. You can just see the chain exiting at the rear top plank.


    IMG_3451.jpg

    Drawing of the worm gear. A bit faint, but you get the idea. I think this will be overkill for a 42' boat, and I'd really like a simpler system, and more than one way of steering for redundancy. I actually sent this to Edson, and a week later an email came back saying the entire office gathered around this image for over an hour, and that no, they couldn't make me one


    IMG_3468.jpg

    Grahams plan for the steering (which I'll show you in the next post) was to have a flat wheel sitting on top of a vertical axle held in place by plumbers blocks. At the bottom of this axle is a chain gypsy from a windlass, that has a section of chain going round it and down through the deck and aft planks to the 'T' bar. I strongly objected to putting the chain through the back of the boat as it seemed a horrible thing to do, and is technically difficult to get perfect first time, what with all the geometry that changes as the rudder moves, and trying to keep it quiet, and not going 'clank clank clank' with every turn of the wheel. I did think that it would be perhaps feaseable to connect the chain section to cables that ran over the gunwhale over some sort of pulley/slip bearing.

    I went ahead with the flat wheel idea, and so built the mechanism into the aft thwart. I have since realised that it will not give enough leverage to turn such a large rudder. I am also sceptical about the reliability of cables being worked over an angle over time.

    My requirements for the steering system are;
    RELIABILITY over long periods of time.
    Feedback.
    Enough leverage/ease of use.
    More than one way to steer.

    This means hydraulics are out, as they don't give any feedback.
    Wormgear may be possible.
    A simple tiller is a must, and might even be the primary mechanism. It's not easy to mount one given the aft profile of the transom.
    If possible I'd love a secondary inside steering mechanism, I've spent a lot of time in the North sea in winter, and don't relish the thought of sitting still in 30 knots at +2c for very long.

    Any other ideas?
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 02:03 PM.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    4,518

    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    I decided to make the aft thwart out of a tropical railway sleeper. Not sure what it is, perhaps you can tell me...it smells of vomit when fresh cut.


    IMG_3822.jpg

    I drew the camber, and sawed 2" slots down to it.


    IMG_3824.jpg

    Chiseled them off....

    IMG_3826.jpg


    And planed it smooth.

    IMG_3827.jpg


    Presented it up to check the camber and draw the underside....this is the position of the intended wheel.


    IMG_3828.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 01-10-2018 at 02:07 PM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,279

    Default Re: Kate LK 126. A Zulu Herring Drifter...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Not sure what it is, perhaps you can tell me...it smells of vomit when fresh cut.
    That would be Angelique. Good choice.

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