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Thread: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Lindstrom, MN
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    3,150

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Quote Originally Posted by SHClark View Post
    I understand how the darts work. Itís pretty obvious to anyone who h as ever tried to compound bend plywood.
    My idea comes from sailmaking. Assume you want to tighten the leech, you could open the seams and increase the overlap. Akin to taking the gore cuts. The alternative is to split the seam in the middle and stitch it back together with less overlap. Letting the middle out rather than pulling the edges in. Some sailmakers have done shocking things with knives and sail repair tape on the way to the starting line.
    I was thinking that the slots would end up being 6Ē or so every foot. They wouldnít have to cross the centerline, just provide enough relief for the center of the panels to stretch enough to prevent the edges from buckling.
    It should come to the same thing.
    I have built more than a few tortured ply boats, I didnít mean any offense.
    SHC
    Offense? I was just trying to explain why I thought it wouldn't work. I had no way of knowing that you had built any of these. I wasn't offended until I found out that you have made more than a few tortured plywood boats and I haven't seen any pictures. Yer holdin' out on us!

    If you look at the picture in Link to Post #95,, you can see what the panels do when wrapped around forms with no cuts. It looks to me like there is either too much wood at the sheer or too little all across the middle. Stefan explained somewhere how he modeled the canoes on his computer then laid the surface flat to locate the cuts. He explained it a lot better than I can.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
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    657

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Another addition to the Gorewood design family: The Fat Gorwood Canoe


    Actually this is a refined version of one of the very early stages of the design development which at the time I didn't further engage in as its midship section was too wide and too deep for my liking (scale model in the bottom right corner).



    Recently I was searching for a design of mine that would have similar characteristics as Storer's Viola 14 sailing canoe. The closest one I found was this early stage design. It is more stable than most common canoes, but not quite as stable as the Viola 14.
    So eventually I ended up developing a completely different sailing canoe (Flywood Two Sheet Sailing Canoe).


    Still for some people this fat canoe might be what they are looking for. If you don't care much for speed but want a canoe that could also be sailed without being too tipsy and offers more capacity and more freeboard, this one might be an option.

    LAO: 478 cm
    Beam: 95 cm
    Midship Depth: 40 cm




    Comparison Flywood Two Sheet Sailing Canoe and the Fat Gorewood Canoe:



    Offsets for the Fat Gorewood Canoe (click image for PDF download):
    Last edited by flo-mo; 03-03-2021 at 10:37 AM.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Lofoten Islands, Norway
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    4

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    It's good to see that you are developing new Gorewoods! I like the concept idea of the Fat G and that it could serve as a good sailing canoe. Do you have some section drawings showing the approximate rocker and cross section hull shape? As always, impressive work flo-mo!

  4. #109
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
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    657

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Hi Johan,

    Here is a picture that somewhat gives an idea of the rocker and the cross section amidships. As it is derived from the small scale model made of paper it is really just an approximation.

    To a degree the rocker can be regulated by the distance at the sheer, especially with this building method. When you start the "metamorphosis" you have excessive rocker. The further the two shears come together, the more the hull stretches out. So more flare means more rocker -- if you introduce more tumblehome you will reduce rocker.

    Depending on the designated use of your canoe it is up to you to decide which shape you prefer.

    Last edited by flo-mo; 03-03-2021 at 07:38 AM.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
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    657

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Just a minor correction on the dimensions of the Fat Gorewood Canoe:

    LAO: 477 cm
    Beam: 95 cm
    Midship depth: 39 cm

    The measurements are taken from the small paper scale model and therefor not really accurate. Also the change is almost insignificant, but still I try to get the numbers right. This is why I also updated the plan for the offsets. I rearranged the layout, but aside of correcting LAO and depth by one centimeter respectively everything else is the same.

    Here is the updated plan (again click the image for PDF download):

    Last edited by flo-mo; 03-03-2021 at 10:34 AM. Reason: typo

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    central cal
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    20,798

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Iím holding out for that sailing canoe. My duck punt is lonely.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Vienna, Austria
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    657

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Peter R has used the English lockdown to design and build his own Gorewood canoe.




    It is based on the very first Gorewood canoe that I built, the Gorewood 14, but has a shear 3 cm higher. The exceptional craftsmanship he demonstrated in building his canoe and the ingenuity he showed in solving tricky problems are remarkable. In addition, Peter has excellently documented the entire construction process in pictures, words and video recordings.




    If you are interested in this special construction method, I recommend you to have a look at his blog in the Song of the Paddle Forum: https://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/fl...re-t58748.html
    You will hardly find a better building instruction.


    p.s.: I envy Peter for being able to use exactly the plywood I always wished I had used to build my canoes.

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    such a nice build to watch.

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Evans, Georgia, USA
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    152

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    How the heck does Peter keep his shop so freaking clean while he is working? Are there little elves that come out between video frames to sweep up?

    That was a nice video. Lots for a beginner like me to learn from it. I like how he has all of his tools and clamps laid out on the very large work table before he starts needing them. I also like his method of bending the gunwales into shape with the zip straps. Was he using a steam iron only? I thought I saw him painting something in the hull while he was bending and steaming?
    ďIf everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isnít thinking.Ē
    ďYouíre never beaten until you admit it.Ē
    - General George Smith Patton

  10. #115
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,151

    Default Re: Plywood Canoe Concept - Birchbark Style

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee.007 View Post
    How the heck does Peter keep his shop so freaking clean while he is working? Are there little elves that come out between video frames to sweep up?
    Right. Shops like that drive me nuts. He's built a lot of boats, but the floor is immaculate.
    -Dave

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