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Thread: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

  1. #71
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    I love those mustachioed paint jobs. This was a great read.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    I wonder how my Coquina would look with a white and red mustache...I hope this is not a thread hijack. I just like those paint schemes.
    Last edited by davebrown; 08-13-2013 at 11:35 PM.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    And no that is not the trailer I use so don't give me no sheet. But I did use it to launch three miles from my house.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    I think you're gonna need to upgrade the rig to a bourcet-malet lugger while you're at it if you're gonna do le moustache there, Dave.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    THat's what I'm talking about.

  6. #76
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    Bristol Bay, Alaska; Central Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Boy, that's a fine looking Coquina, Dave! I'm glad you enjoyed reading the thread. There were a few versions of the 'mustache' scheme, though I can't find any mention as to the 'why' for the design. It would look great with the plumb bow on your boat. On lapstrake hulls, there seem to be two designs I could find.

    From sheer strake to stem:




    ...or following a strake to the waterline:


    If anyone knows why... I'm all ears!

    R

  7. #77
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    "There are only two proper colors to paint a yacht. White, or black, and only a mad Frenchman would paint his boat sea foam green with a red and white 'mustache'. Hrmph!"

    How's that one go again?

    R

  8. #78
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    WOW! The oil painting on post 76! Re: Coquina: yes, I am not bound by tradition. It's all fun!

  9. #79
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    It really is all fun. And yeah, that painting is about as salty as they come.

    R

  10. #80
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Interesting to see those boats are fitted with daggerboards. Great wee boats.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    This one has interesting planking...clinker and carvel.

    Danish Pilot Cutter



    http://www.diy-wood-boat.com/for-sal...m-denmark.html

    I've often thought that a smooth bottom and clinker topsides above the waterline would be overall optimum, giving minimum drag, but slow rolling when healed and a drier boat with lower wetted area, rather than this way around, but hey who's to know.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 09-20-2016 at 09:07 AM.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Good point on using the strip plank scantlings. I think Mr. Vivier is open to discussions and supplementing/customizing his plans for builders, but I'm fairly confident that I could do what I want with the plans for Ebihen as they are. I've also come to grips that building a 'replica' of a traditional workboat design isn't really practical right now. As Eric and James have pointed out, the traditional type are more burdensome and have features that just aren't needed in a recreational boat. It's the traditional building methods that I really desire, and a workboat look. I think the Ebihen meets a lot of my criteria, including and especially that lovely rig. (which I'd love to see on your beach pram!)

    I believe robert666 recently designed and modeled a similar fishing-type small lugger and was hoping he'd stop in for a comment.

    Eric, thanks for the encouragement on traditional building. My thoughts are lots of lapstrakes for trailering and dimensional stability, well bedded, and tight while dry so she doesn't need to take up. The boat won't ever be in the water long enough for swelling to damage fasteners or structural timbers. I think this can be done!

    R
    Strange coincidence I should find this today, I dug out the plans today and played with a few modifications based on recent experiences. At the time I designed this boat I was living a semi self sufficient crofters lifestyle. I was hoping to supplemnet my income with a bit of summer fishing for mackeral, saithe, crab and lobster. The boat was designed for general purpose subsistence/comercial fishing arround the west coats of scotland. The project was shelved due to personal reasons and lifestyle change. I've since spent my time living aboard and cruising all over scotland in a hillyard 2.5 tonner, and more recently a 5 tonner that I'm halfway through restoring. I dug out the plans a few days ago when I found out that mackerel were 125 a box at the local fish market this season, 3 boxes is a reasonable days catch for 1 man in a small boat. No liscences are needed for engineless fishing vessels in scotland. I'm hoping to carry out a few trials with a replica lochfyne skiff that I'll have use of next summer, and maybe then I'll finally get arround to building her!

    My take on this sort of thing is,
    Boats under 20ft are best kept open or half decked. Not to heavily ballasted and quite flat floored midships section for initial stability. Some allowance made for rowabilty, maybe 80/20 sail/oar. Rigged with a boomless lug yawl, masts as far into the ends as possible for maximum working space and unstayed for easy lowering when rowing or lying to gear. Jibs on bowsprits are an unnessecary complication at this size. Mizzen is almost essential for heaving to, reefing, helm balance and self steering. Boomless lugsail is safe, easily handled and means only the sheet is in the central work area of the boat.

    Boats over 20ft are much more capable sea boats and are better decked over and externally ballasted with as much draft as is reasonable. At this size rigs are better stayed and gaff rig comes into its own. Boom must clear my head when stood in the cockpit at all times! Mizzens are less essential, but still worth having. Staysails and jibs are much more workable from a steady deck. I carry a sculling oar for harbours, but any disstance is covered sail or motor at this size.

    Bear in mind that my ideas have been formed whilst cruising and fishing in the unsettled weather conditions of the west coast of scotland, mostly engineless and usually single handed.

    Robert
    Last edited by robert666; 09-27-2016 at 03:10 PM.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Ebihen has allways been very high up on my list of boats I like, but I'm really not a fan of bouyancy tanks, eggcrate framing etc. I think it works well in its place but I like solidly framed and repairable traditional construction for heavy boats. Both strip planking and clinker ply are good methods but I'd be building over a solid skeleton of laminated frames and using a full complement of metal fastenings with either method. I try to avoid enclosed spaces on boats as much as possible. Looking forward to seeing her clinker planked, that will be a truly beautiful boat.

    R.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Yevsky View Post
    Oops, I'm guilty of posting without thinking. Yes, of course moving the mizzen aft would increase the tendency to point into the wind. The subject of traditional boat design had always fascinated me and I wonder if any scholar has done serious research on the whys of traditional working boat designs. Anyone know of a book on the subject? Sorry for the thread drift......
    There is much useful information in " Inshore Craft of Britain in the days of sail and oar". To get the best of this two volume set, have a really close look "google earth in combination with yachting "pilots" and charts, and consider the designs described within those books, and also McKees book on the same subject, and work out what factors in the boats made them particularly suited for their use in that environment.
    Then consider the area in which you want to sail, and compare that with the areas described in the book.


    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  15. #85
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    Auriol, France
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Hello,

    too bad Ryan seems to have disappeared from here,

    But I may have an answer to the "moustache" question. It may have been to prevent other fishermen around to estimate the speed by looking at the wake, a little bit like on some warships.

    Ebihen is definitely a nice shape (but I'm Bretton... )

  16. #86
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Enjoyed re-reading this thread.
    I'm going to add a couple of shameless photos of my little Ilur coming together. It's snowing here today.

    Mike

    Ilur snow.jpg

    Ilur interior.jpg
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  17. #87
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    Queensland, Australia
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    My carvel pick for traditional.



    Last edited by southseas; 03-02-2019 at 07:54 PM.

  18. #88
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    mexico city
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    Loving this thread!

  19. #89
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    Oct 2005
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    The Netherlands
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    Default Re: First Build - Traditional Clinker or Carvel

    There is an Ebihen 16 on my driveway and I am making the sails, tent rigging, so I know the boat. While I like her very much I think you are wasting your money to buy the plans and change the construction.
    As you mentioned Jumbo and like luggers, think about Silver Thread, a Cornish lugger from Simon Watts. She is 15' something, lapstrake, lugrigged yawl, centreboard and very pretty. Oar and sail boat. You really should google her.
    Frank.
    www.oarandsail.nl

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