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Thread: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

  1. #246
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I would be inclined to build with chine logs/battens. Much easier to get a good glass sheathing. I do not think the lap-strake with these wide planks would be particularly more visually interesting.

  2. #247
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I will have to find the photo and add it later, but even a few panels lapped can look ok, at least i think it looks marginally better than just a jointed chine. Agreed sheathing is a lot easier without a lap. I would consider using a batten, but also lapped, as previously mentioned, the batten can aid in assembly on the job and scribing planks, working alone is stressy enough at times to have to deal with a 30ft plank covered in goo, but maybe some people are way more organised and methodic than myself.



    Its a personal thing, you dont even get to see it from the cockpit, so perhaps easier build and sheathing take more importance. I would go for it though myself...
    Last edited by skaraborgcraft; 03-10-2016 at 12:46 AM.

  3. #248
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    That's a cool looking boat, what is it?
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  4. #249
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Thats a Brock 24, larger sister to the original 20ft. Not too many made, ply on stringer, Iroko backbone. Some info on another here, dont think the colour does it any favours when lapped.
    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1997...m#.VuGt8kBuc1g

  5. #250
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Thanks, very cool boat. I think it looks fine w/o being lapstrake.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  6. #251
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    What with the pound taking a knocking, might be a good buy for you. Shipping at present is about as cheap as it ever has been?? Or do you really need the bigger boat? Devils advocate question....

  7. #252
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Ah but I'd miss out on all the fun of building. I also see the build-a-boat route as a pay as you go proposition, less sticker shock, more of a a slow bleed. Still that is an interesting boat, thanks for sharing.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  8. #253
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I have found "slow bleed " is the best way to go, being able to stop and start when you like with no pressure helps to make an enjoyable build, rather than becoming an expensive mill-stone around ones neck. As you infer, part of the fun is the build process itself. Looking forward to watch it come together, at your pace.....

  9. #254
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    I have found "slow bleed " is the best way to go, being able to stop and start when you like with no pressure helps to make an enjoyable build, rather than becoming an expensive mill-stone around ones neck. As you infer, part of the fun is the build process itself. Looking forward to watch it come together, at your pace.....
    I agree entirely. Go at your own pace (provided you have the time to invest, very important consideration!). You can buy a boat, but the satisfaction in seeing one come together from your own hands is something to be savoured. You can also have a dollar each way, you may be able to get frames or even planking on some designs CNC cut to speed up the process. Spreading the cost was one consideration for me as well.


    Mal
    Last edited by Quest; 03-12-2016 at 03:53 PM.
    Quest

    Moving slowly towards a Welsford Sundowner.

    Hobart Wooden Boat Festival 2017, or maybe 2019ish??

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...undowner-build
    http://sundownerbuild.blogspot.com.au/

  10. #255
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Thanks for the encouragement. Just about to begin building. I may have changed my mind once again however. I am drawn again to the original 33 footer with the 8 1/2 foot beam. I think it will be slightly easier boat to build and own, and it would still meet our needs. It's a bit more spartan but I like it and I like the cat-ketch rig. It's easy to get drawn into wanting more boat...

    I will begin cutting the bulkheads in two weeks, so I still have time to waffle between the two designs, but at the moment I am leaning towards the boat first posted on this thread.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  11. #256
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Easy to justify a few extra feet. I can get everything i "need" in 26ft, but 28ft would be easier, 30ft would be noticeably faster. As you say, easy to sucked into going bigger than your needs, some things are worth making space for, other times a different concept on layout may get what you need in a smaller package. Certainly dollars=displacement can play a factor too, bigger rig, engine, ground tackle ad infinitum.....you know the story.....

  12. #257
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    I think the single stick sprit rig looks wonderfully simple. I am not sure whether it has the driving power to sail effectively in light airs, particularly to windward. I would consider this probably as a motor-sailor with a good fair wind rig.

    I tend to be a sailor and really strongly prefer sailing if at all possible, so though it looks like a very attractive option, I know I would end up being frustrated. I would choose the two stick ketch rig. You will have to make this choice for the sort of boating you want to do.

    I have not a lot of experience with the sprit rig. I would at least consider alternative 4 sided sail arrangements. The idea that you can brail up to the mast in light to moderate winds, when you want to stop. Or you can lower the sail and even remove it and stow it away in moments, a fraction of the time it takes to take off the sails on a modern boat. If just poking around, hanging out, lazy beach...book...appropriate beverage..., seldom moving longer distances is your thing, then this sprit rig is almost ideal. With a good breeze she will perform very satisfactorily, for reaching and running, and not be hopeless to windward.
    Old works (like Warrington Smythe, I think) speak of the sprit as being a danger in bad weather, and a rather serious bit of kit to move around in good weather.

    Would it be quicker to get sail off than (say) a bermudan main with a luff groove and loose foot?

  13. #258
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Firstly, the Sprit rig was popular for all manner of boats and small ships in the past. Everything from inshore trading barges, and lighters to ships boats and launches for naval vessels used the sprit rig. When handled with skill it was a handy rig and was preferred over some of the alternatives because of its handiness. It could set a larger sail than any other and still have all the spars stow inside when taken down. The Thames barges typically sailed with "a man and a boy" and the trade included dropping the whole rig to pass under bridges, and re-hoisted immediately after passing clear. It was considered I think to be a little more weatherly than the alternatives with the materials and technology ( and costs) at hand. Phil Bolger was a big fan of the traditional sprit rig, and used it on a number of his designs. I do not remember what Warrington Smythe said about this rig, but most of the disparaging comments I have heard come from people with little experience with this rig.
    I have used this rig only a little, and cannot say I am a fan, but the simple fact that it was pretty universal on certain types of vessels in the past tells me it was not as bad or as risky as some suggest. Certainly in all light to moderate winds the sail can be brailed up to the mast almost instantly, leaving the decks still clear for moving around. Even in strong winds brailing can quickly depower the rig temporarily.
    As to rigging a Bermudian sail in a luff groove. I have only seen a luff groove on small sailing dinghys and day sailors. They do go up and down fairly easily, under good conditions. In a squall, not so good, when the sail is slid out of the groove there is nothing there to help contain it. The advantage of the luff groove is the sail can be easily removed and stowed separately, and the boat hauled up in the yard for storage.
    I would never use a luff groove for a larger cruising boat, but would use either slides/track or lacings.

  14. #259
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    Firstly, the Sprit rig was popular for all manner of boats and small ships in the past. Everything from inshore trading barges, and lighters to ships boats and launches for naval vessels used the sprit rig. When handled with skill it was a handy rig and was preferred over some of the alternatives because of its handiness. It could set a larger sail than any other and still have all the spars stow inside when taken down. The Thames barges typically sailed with "a man and a boy" and the trade included dropping the whole rig to pass under bridges, and re-hoisted immediately after passing clear. It was considered I think to be a little more weatherly than the alternatives with the materials and technology ( and costs) at hand. Phil Bolger was a big fan of the traditional sprit rig, and used it on a number of his designs. I do not remember what Warrington Smythe said about this rig, but most of the disparaging comments I have heard come from people with little experience with this rig.
    I have used this rig only a little, and cannot say I am a fan, but the simple fact that it was pretty universal on certain types of vessels in the past tells me it was not as bad or as risky as some suggest. Certainly in all light to moderate winds the sail can be brailed up to the mast almost instantly, leaving the decks still clear for moving around. Even in strong winds brailing can quickly depower the rig temporarily.
    As to rigging a Bermudian sail in a luff groove. I have only seen a luff groove on small sailing dinghys and day sailors. They do go up and down fairly easily, under good conditions. In a squall, not so good, when the sail is slid out of the groove there is nothing there to help contain it. The advantage of the luff groove is the sail can be easily removed and stowed separately, and the boat hauled up in the yard for storage.
    I would never use a luff groove for a larger cruising boat, but would use either slides/track or lacings.
    Just passin' on info I thought was interesting, as I'd never come across the issue before. As you say, rigs are a product of their usage, times and technology and the boat in question seems to be different in all three respects from the classic sprit rigged boats.

    By the way, luff grooves are definitely not just for daysailers and small boats - boats up to 80' LOA use them. And tracks and slides come off the rig very easily too.

  15. #260
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    [QUOTE=Chris249;4832910
    By the way, luff grooves are definitely not just for daysailers and small boats - boats up to 80' LOA use them. And tracks and slides come off the rig very easily too.[/QUOTE]

    My folkboat has a luff groove, and i have repaired strained tracks usually by fitting a longer screw if a sold mast. I really like the simplicity of lacing, usually only used on a boat with no crosstrees, but i did see a great idea of using a wire in the luff above the crosstrees and lacing below; a set up that would benefit from a good purchase or winch to keep taught. I would keep the hardware (expense) to a minimum.

  16. #261
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Back to the Sea Bright 33. I like the Ketch rig. It is somewhat similar to my own Meadowlark, with the main and mizzen roughly the same size. I know this geometry works very well on the Meadowlark as a cruising rig. Were I building this boat, I'd use the lacings as shown in the drawing.

    With Meadowlark the two masts have stays and shrouds similar to any Bermudian mast, with intermediate shrouds and upper shrouds on spreaders. The sail and the short gaff run on tracks. the masts are connected with a triadic stay and both masts are sprung forward a little to provide head-stay tension. This all works very well but it is somewhat more complicated and expensive than the simple plan drawn by Reuel Parker.
    [IMG]DSCF1838 by gilberj55, on Flickr[/IMG]

  17. #262
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    For planking I have the choice of using 5/8 marine Fir A/B for $65.00 a sheet, or 1/2 inch Meranti Hydro-Tek at $83.00/sheet. Reuel Parker specifies 5/8 unless using "exotics" From what I could see when I looked at both products is that the Meranti has more plys and seems better quality tho' not as thick.

    Any suggestions, opinions?
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  18. #263
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    The meranti will be much nicer to work with, but probably no better in the long run. Marine fir will be~ 25% less expensive for the actual hull skin. The flat bottom I'd suggest be somewhat more strongly built.
    All the traditional boats intended to take ground regularly are heavy on bottom structure.

  19. #264
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Good suggestions, thanks!
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  20. #265
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Well I finally got started on the boat. I settled on the Sea Bright 33, the original design with the 8 1/2 foot beam. It is a design that will meet my needs and is about all the boat that I can afford, time and money-wise. I have all the bulkheads cut and up, the transom almost done and the stem pieces cut. It feels good....
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  21. #266
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Congratulations.......photos please...!

  22. #267
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Glad to hear you made a start, always a good thing once the choice is made.....

  23. #268
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Thanks, I will get some pics up soon.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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