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Thread: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

  1. #1
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    Default Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33


    I am taking a very hard look at this design and would appreciate any input anyone might give. My plan is to build it, and sail it to the Bahamas and keep it there, moored in a shallow sound when we are not there. He also has a new 36 footer that I have study plans for which looks amazing but is perhaps too much of a boat to build in a couple of years. We hope to sail it 3 months a year. Another option under consideration is his Egret 31.5 or 36 footer.















    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Do it! Always fancied seeing one of these large skiffs come together. Lapstrake,batten or stitch n goo?

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I've taken a very hard look at quite a few designs in this size range that there isn't a dog's chance in hell I'll ever build and I have to say this one looks just as nice as any of them. Got a launch date?

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I would do this using the batten seam method as I think it would be easier than the lapstrake. I would also use an outboard in a well which he says is doable if it's a short shaft.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    It should drive pretty easy under power. Has he got a weight estimate on it?

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Been away for a while... Anyway, I am probably going to build a Seabright 33, but I have been exchanging emails with Reuel Parker about the prospect of having him draw another 33 foot version of this boat, one not held to the 8'6" beam requirement for towing. It would have a beam to length ratio closer to the 23 foot version of this boat which means a beam around 10 feet or less.
    Does this strike anyone as a good/bad idea? Would it make for a more seaworthy boat? I know it would gain me some more elbow room, but also some more work and expense. The boat would be mainly cruised in the Bahamas but I'd like to be able to venture farther afield if the urge strikes. The boat will mostly be sailed by just 2 people.

    The boat as drawn strikes me as being slightly narrow for it's length, and I feel it may be on the tender side. I'd love to hear arguments for and against and design critiques before I commission him to draw another boat. (maybe what I'd really like is to be talked into this boat...)

    Thanks

    Here are the figures on the boat as drawn. (An addition 500lbs of ballast can be added if the boat will not be trailered)

    L.B.P. 33' 3"
    L.W.L. 29' 5 1/2"
    LENGTH SPARRED 35' 2 1/2"
    BEAM 8’ 6”
    DRAFT 1' 9"/4' 10"
    DISPLACEMENT 7,000 lbs. (approx)
    TRAILER WEIGHT
    5,000 lbs. (approx)
    BALLAST 2,000 lbs.
    TYPE Sea Bright Skiff
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    That centerboard would make it uncomfortable. I think it's not a great boat for the purpose you have in mind, the sad fact is you would be much better off buying a used fiberglass boat.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Nice looking boat but I'm with Hwyl. I would not build a sailboat over around 20 feet. Too much work and money.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I still like the concept BUT, it is a long boat with very little room. Maybe the large cockpit area is more of a good thing for Bahama cruising? Anyway, in the same vein as this Seabright, have you seen the Atkins Little Water Sr? It would have more internal room, and although i have no idea about the ballast arrangement, looks capable.

    http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Sail/LittleWaterSr.html





    Almost 3ft draught, is that too deep?

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    As much as I love the design, and having grown up next to sea Bright & owned a number of boxed garboard & rolled garboard keel boats, I would agree with the others. Might be better to find a 'cheap' F.G. production boat. The "Sea Bright 33" would be a nice boat to sail, but among other things will not be a real 'performer' and will be tender.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    If i were to build an offshore sharpie,
    i would look at nis sharpies too, fast and sea worthy.
    Strikes me as not alot of boat for 33ft. The wide beam idea would make her less tender and more roomy. perhaps faster off the wind. not much more to build.
    James

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I like this boat a lot. It resembles in some ways the Herreshoff Meadowlark so I am perhaps a little swayed by that. I like the ketch rig, having sailed with my own of similar geometry I know its strong points and week points. This boat will not be as stiff as the Meadowlark clearly. A lot of the time this will be an advantage, as the Meadowlark is very stiff and can be really annoying with a wake or waves on the beam and no wind to lean on. This would not suffer the same way. This boat would not be as stiff sailing, you will have to reef earlier, but this rig geometry is one of the best I know for reefing options. The hull will move easily, so when the wind is blowing you will not need much sail to move her. I am not a fan of centre-boards in small cabin cruising boats, specially with my leeboards and nothing in the way in the middle of the cabin on Whimbrel , but leeboards have disadvantages to, and I don't think Mr. Parker likes leeboards at all. Wider beam will certainly open more room below, and make the boat stiffer. I don't think the basic sailing would be as good. The wide shallow boat will still not be a sail on its bottom sort of boat, and may suffer real changes in balance as she heels further. I'd have to say I would keep her narrow, though going a little longer might not hurt (then you can go a little wider to). I might also consider a little more ballast, an additional 500 or 600 lbs would only put her down about an inch and improver her performance in a blow. I am not sure why you think building a wider boat would not be as much more work to build than a longer boat....say the 36 footer.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    That Atkins Little Water displaces around 6800lbs. Im not sure if the page is current, but appears to be up for sale
    http://northeastboat.weebly.com/davey-lewis.html no price listed.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    The standard advice is build it if you love building and want a project. Enjoy the process from start to finish however it comes. If you want to cruise and soon then you are much better off buying a boat, a glass boat has much to offer if you intend to leave it offshore on a mooring for 9 months unattended. On the design, this strikes me a nice daysailer/weekender and if its trailerable (big trailer!) all the better!
    whatever rocks your boat

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I know you can buy a used fiberglass boat pretty cheap, but I can't get excited about the idea. I guess I want to build a boat, go through the creative process etc and then sail it. I can wait a couple or 3 years to get on the water. Financially it doesn't make much sense to build a boat this size of course but good luck finding a extreme shoal draft fiberglass boat anyway; they are few and far between. I want a boat that is both shallow draft and "seaworthy'. It's hard to come by both but I think Mr. Parker is one of the few designers that manages to combine both qualities in good looking designs that have traditional roots. Yes the centerboard in the middle of the cabin is a drawback but for cruising in the tropics I value the deck space/layout in a design a little above the interior, and centerboards are pretty handy things.
    But please feel free to add ideas, critiques and designs to the pot... Little Water Sr. is a nice design that I have looked at but it would have to be adapted to modern building techniques for me to build it.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    P.S - What do you think of the Sprit sail rig? I kind of like it's simplicity. What are it's strengths and weaknesses vs. the cat ketch?

    The 36 foot Seabright to me seems like it would be a lot more boat to build, it has a lot more going on in the interior and a larger rig, but it has loads of appeal.

    Sea Bright 36


    Category: Sailboats Cruising












    SEA BRIGHT 36
    L.B.P.: 36′
    BEAM: 10′ 11″
    DRAFT: 1′ 8″/4′ 7″
    DISPLACEMENT: 9,500 lbs
    BALLAST: 3,483 lbs, 2,000 lbs lead foil laminated in keel; 250 lbs trim; 633 lbs water; 600 lbs fuel
    WATER: 75 gallons
    FUEL: 80 gallons
    RIG: Gaff-rigged Cat Schooner
    TYPE: New Jersey Sea Bright Skiff. Suitable for sailing in coastal and offshore conditions. This model is designed with watertight floatation compartments and accommodations for four with a galley and head. The type has an excellent record as a lifesaving vessel, and can be used as an island-hopper, coastal cruiser, and ocean voyager. This vessel is an excellent candidate for long passages single-handed.
    CONSTRUCTION: Marine plywood covered with epoxy-saturated Xynole-polyester fabric. The hull is frameless, being built over bulkheads. Options for planking include chine log and stitch-and-glue (Plans are drawn for stitch-and-glue). Skill-level required for construction is moderate.
    OPTIONS: An inboard diesel (2 cyl Yanmar 2YM15) may be installed under the forward end of the cockpit well as shown. An outboard in a well is also possible for this model. Permanent ballast consists of lead foil laminated inside the keel bottom on both sides of the CB trunk covered with ¼″ teak & holly plywood. Standing headroom is 5′ 10″. Additional rigs are available on a custom-design basis.





    DESIGN SPECS
    Designer: Reuel B. Parker

    Year of Design: 2013

    LOA: 36'

    Beam Length: 10' 11"

    Draft Length: 1' 8"/4' 7"

    LWL: 31' 9.5"

    Displacement: 9,500 lbs approx

    Materials: Wood

    Propulsion: Sail/Inboard-Outboard optional auxiliary

    Skill Level to Build: Moderate

    Available as: Complete Plans

    Cost: $850

    Website: www.parker-marine.com









    - See more at: http://www.woodenboat.com/boat-plans....JXK3IjOp.dpuf
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



  17. #17
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I see the 33 as a fun boat to sail in a place like the Bahamas, and practical for the shoal waters there. But I'm not sure about livability for a month or more. Big centerboard down the middle and not lots of headroom. The head is in a rather public location, too. Those items might get old pretty quickly. I'd suggest doing a simple mockup of the interior, full scale, and seeing how well it works for you.

    I presume you reviewed and rejected Karl Stambaugh's Bahama Mamma? At 30', a couple of feet shorter, but more pragmatically laid out. It's got the beam you're talking about, too.

    -Dave

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigadog View Post
    P.S - What do you think of the Sprit sail rig? I kind of like it's simplicity. What are it's strengths and weaknesses vs. the cat ketch?

    The 36 foot Seabright to me seems like it would be a lot more boat to build, it has a lot more going on in the interior and a larger rig, but it has loads of appeal.

    Sea Bright 36


    Category: Sailboats Cruising












    SEA BRIGHT 36
    L.B.P.: 36′
    BEAM: 10′ 11″
    DRAFT: 1′ 8″/4′ 7″
    DISPLACEMENT: 9,500 lbs
    BALLAST: 3,483 lbs, 2,000 lbs lead foil laminated in keel; 250 lbs trim; 633 lbs water; 600 lbs fuel
    WATER: 75 gallons
    FUEL: 80 gallons
    RIG: Gaff-rigged Cat Schooner
    TYPE: New Jersey Sea Bright Skiff. Suitable for sailing in coastal and offshore conditions. This model is designed with watertight floatation compartments and accommodations for four with a galley and head. The type has an excellent record as a lifesaving vessel, and can be used as an island-hopper, coastal cruiser, and ocean voyager. This vessel is an excellent candidate for long passages single-handed.
    CONSTRUCTION: Marine plywood covered with epoxy-saturated Xynole-polyester fabric. The hull is frameless, being built over bulkheads. Options for planking include chine log and stitch-and-glue (Plans are drawn for stitch-and-glue). Skill-level required for construction is moderate.
    OPTIONS: An inboard diesel (2 cyl Yanmar 2YM15) may be installed under the forward end of the cockpit well as shown. An outboard in a well is also possible for this model. Permanent ballast consists of lead foil laminated inside the keel bottom on both sides of the CB trunk covered with ¼″ teak & holly plywood. Standing headroom is 5′ 10″. Additional rigs are available on a custom-design basis.





    DESIGN SPECS
    Designer: Reuel B. Parker

    Year of Design: 2013

    LOA: 36'

    Beam Length: 10' 11"

    Draft Length: 1' 8"/4' 7"

    LWL: 31' 9.5"

    Displacement: 9,500 lbs approx

    Materials: Wood

    Propulsion: Sail/Inboard-Outboard optional auxiliary

    Skill Level to Build: Moderate

    Available as: Complete Plans

    Cost: $850

    Website: www.parker-marine.com









    - See more at: http://www.woodenboat.com/boat-plans-kits/sea-bright-36#sthash.JXK3IjOp.dpuf
    ............... For the mission you have proposed I'd say this is a much better option. Live-ability over an extended period of time would be much better, particularly if you are sharing the space. Personally I like the ketch rig on the smaller one. more options. I think this is the better choice than making the 33 wider. I really like the full width cabin. It is a stronger structure and provides lots of buoyancy high up where you might want it in a hard chance. It massively increases the cabin space in a good way......WRT the spritsail sloop rig, I have little experience, but I do not like it for this job. The ketch rig allows playing with the balance. The sprit or a similar sort of lug sail would be a bit easier to sail and would perhaps be the rig of choice if you are essentially motor sailing....ie sailing only when the wind serves. I do not like motoring and personally would go with the ketch rig..
    Last edited by gilberj; 05-12-2014 at 05:30 PM.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I like the design.

    On the 33', I wouldn't build the cabin side to hull joint like that. Seems like an opportunity to leak, plus messes up your head-leaning space down below when you want to sit and read a book, and not bump the back of your skull on the cabin side. I'd keep that joint more or less flush.

    I'd go with the ketch rig, too.

    There is one note about ballast, but I can't quite read it. I'm surprised this design doesn't call for a ballast-shoe on the outside, a wide plank of cast-iron pierced for the CB slot. To make it's occasional way upwind in the trades, with a beam of only 8.5' (narrow shoulders), it will need enough ballast to stay somewhat upright.

    I'd be inclined to build it with a pivoting drop-rudder, but since it's hung externally, it's easy to change or experiment.

    Dave

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    And since you'd be anchoring a lot, some sort of short wide bowsprit would make that a lot easier (by keeping the flukes away from the hull).

    Dave

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I would also recommend a ballast shoe, rather than inside ballast. Whimbrel has a welded steel box filled with steel encased in concrete. It is about 3" deep amidships, and about 15" wide, plenty wide enough to provide a stable platform when dried out on the tide. It also adds great strength to the hull. It also provides a space between a rocky bottom and the wood hull bottom in case there is that one sharp rock in an otherwise clear gravelly or sandy bottom when and where I dry out.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Lots of good feedback, Keep it coming.

    Gilberj, would you happen to have a photo of your boat's box keel?

    Thanks, Frank
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    +1 on the external ballast shoe. Little Water Sr could easily be lined off for the same kind of options that Parker offers, or even strip if that floats your boat.
    Personally i would avoid the sprit on anything this size. The Ketch rig looks workable. The CMD design has a lot to offer also, but the rig looks boring...

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigadog View Post
    Lots of good feedback, Keep it coming.

    Gilberj, would you happen to have a photo of your boat's box keel?

    Thanks, Frank
    ....I think I may have a photo or two but IIRC they were not intended to show the keel. In any case I am away for a few days and cannot even look for the photos. Normally The keel is resting on the sand or gravel so even when I am on the hard I don't see much of it. If you have Herreshoffs book "Sensible Cruising Designs" you can see the basic idea though Herreshoff intended the keel to be sections of lead with lapped joints. Mine follows the longitudinal curve of the bottom starting from forward about 2.5" deep forward and about 3"amidship and becomes deeper aft forming the forward part of the skeg. The builder used wood patterns I think to get the curve right and welded up the box with I think 5/16 plate. The box keel is about 18 feet long I think (never measured it), about 4" wide where it connects to the false keel forward expanding to about 15" amidships and then tapering down to ~3.5" wide where it connects with the forward end of the wooden skeg, and I think weighs about 3000 lbs. I have another 600 lbs or so inside for a total of about 45% of displacement. In a storm a few years ago Whimbrel broke free from her mooring (never trust someone else to dive on your mooring) and went ashore on a shelving rock. She pounded for a little over an hour before being pulled off. Other than a patch ~2' x 2' of bottom where to paint was scrubbed off there was no damage. The boat never leaked, this a traditionally planked boat. She basically bounced on that steel box. If I could figure out how to get a sketch on the forum I'd do that as I think it would be more clear.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Have you looked at the Centennial http://www.tedbrewer.com/sail_glass/centennial.htm Mystic? http://www.tedbrewer.com/sail_wood/mystic.htm. ........ or here is a thread describing sailing the Meadowlark

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I have looked at Centennial and even contacted Mr. Brewer once about it. Mystic is interesting also, I don't know about the pinked stern tho'. There's no link for the Meadowlark article. I Have looked for used Meadowlarks - not all that common, especially the 37 ft version.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I actually drove 8 hours to look at a Bahamamama that was for sale in N.C., it was the pilothouse version. The boat struck me as chopped up and kinda of claustrophobic.
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    If you like Rueul Parker's designs you should look at this Pilot Schooner for sale, only $4900.

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1998...s#.U3N6DMZVvTQ

    I will beg you for advice, your reply will be concise, and I will listen very nicely and then go out and do exactly what I want! (Apologies to Lerner and Lowe.)

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigadog View Post
    Been away for a while...
    banned?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by alkorn View Post
    If you like Rueul Parker's designs you should look at this Pilot Schooner for sale, only $4900.

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1998...s#.U3N6DMZVvTQ

    Wow, don't get much wood and epoxy for that price. And, it looks nice inside. With your small change, a cabin between the masts for headroom and off you go.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    I saw that one or a similar one. They are cool boats, but draw nearly 4 feet. The place I would keep this boat is called Turtle Sound on Crooked Island, and the entrance is about 2 1/2 feet. M

    Another boat that looks interesting is Parker's 38 foot Maxi-Trailerable version of this:

    The "Snowy Egret"
    If he ever drinks the brew of 10 tanna leaves, he will become a monster the likes of which the world has never seen



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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    +1 on the external ballast shoe. Little Water Sr could easily be lined off for the same kind of options that Parker offers, or even strip if that floats your boat.
    Personally i would avoid the sprit on anything this size. The Ketch rig looks workable. The CMD design has a lot to offer also, but the rig looks boring...


    For what its worth, here’s my advice/suggestions.


    I understand your requirements, and it is VERY hard to find a suitable shoal draft (<2.5’) sailboat in FG. The Meadowlark is wonderful, but i hate leeboards with a passion. I had enough experiences with them in the UK. Before you consider them, sail a boat with them, and form your own opinion.


    I would build the Sea Bright 33 as designed, it is a wonderful balanced design, though i might consider adding a strake to the hull, and reducing the cabin side height by the same amount.


    I would definitely make the external keel/plate as a steel sheet. i once did something similar in the UK, it was 2” thick steel plate, gas cut from something (scrap?) in a shipyard. I drilled slightly random 3/8” clearance holes all around the outside edge, and had it galvanized. No hot dip bath big enough, at least locally. Note; the transport locally cost more than the steel and cutting did.
    After offering up the keel, i drilled through the boat bottom using the ‘keel’ as a template. I spread tar on the steel keel upper surface, then used galvanized carriage bolts through the hull, a lot of low stress fasteners. Then i trimmed around the outside (rough) edges of the steel with 2 X 2” timber, and filled the gap(s) with tar. Much cheaper and faster than grinding the steel edge. These days, water jet, or plasma would do a fine job. Apart from the tar, a similar scheme would work for you.


    Remember, some one once wrote, you bolt a lead keel to a wooden boat, but you bolt a wooden boat to a steel or reinforced concrete keel. As stated earlier the protruding keel plate will help protect the bottom timbers.


    Read Maurice Griffith's “Little Ships, and Shoal Waters” for advice on making center boards, how to prevent mud getting inside the box and jamming things, and how to recover once so jammed. Theres a lot of good advice in their.


    I have sailed with this interior layout many times, and it is excellent. Though the centerboard box intrudes, the table on it slightly disguises it, and after a while you hardly notice. The layout shown in the Sea Bright 36 is very poor, though I believe it has its advocates for in a marina. If you are desperate, I've seen a design on this forum (i think) for twin centerboards, one under the forward bunk, the other under the cockpit. This would give much better control in a following sea, and raising the boards differentially would allow effortless self steering.


    I personally would favor a rig a bit like the Reuel 36 shown above, two raked free standing masts, but with a short ‘club’ at the peek, not an actual gaff (uses a single halyard). Both masts roughly the same height, and with similar sails on them. This looks very traditional in the Caribbean, and has tremendous power, especially when loose footed, and/or on a loose foot boom. Add 3, or perhaps 4, reef lines, you WILL need them. I would abandon the bowsprit and jib, they are a real pain when cruising. An extended anchor roller is a good idea, and you could fly a ‘Geneker’ from the end of this to the foremast. Teamed with a matching color mizzen staysail, and both in spinnaker nylon, this would make a real power house for off wind sailing. These sails could have wire leading edges, but i would suggest tape, as trying to ‘beat’ with these sails is usually a waste of effort. Remember, gentlemen never sail to windward!


    Make sure you have someone to keep an eye on your boat when you are not there, storms do happen, and its a long way to go to add another line. I would consider pulling it above the tide line.

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    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigadog View Post
    I saw that one or a similar one. They are cool boats, but draw nearly 4 feet. The place I would keep this boat is called Turtle Sound on Crooked Island, and the entrance is about 2 1/2 feet.

    For what its worth, and you did ask. i expect counter argument, and other opinions too.


    Here is how i would build the Sea bright 33. First, you will find the amount of work in a sea bright 36 quite a lot more than the 33, the ‘square rule’ applies. Lengthening the 33 would not add much work, could improve it, but may alter the ‘balance’ somewhat.


    I would, and this is a personal thing, add another strake to the side, rather like Reuels 28’ pilot Schooner, Stone Horse, or Maurice Griffith's Kylix. It would be quite vertical, and eventually be painted a diferent color? This alowes the 'cabin' to virtually disapear.


    http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=6583


    The ‘free standing’ masts need really strong partners, hence the raised deck, or flush deck, design. I would even try for Reuel’s ‘pilot schooner 28 upper side elevation, or something similar. The increase in visual room in these ‘raised deck’ boats has to be experienced to be believed, and they tend to have a better sealed deck edge.

    I would at least consider twin CB's, one forward under the bunk, the other aft under the cockpit. I personally would avoid outboard power, but this is a personal predudice.


    Though Reuel gives excellent advice (in his book “The new cold molding”) on installing ports in hulls, and i agree the importance of daylight/light inside a hull is paramount, i do think large side windows are overrated.


    At sea the windward side sees the sky, and the leeward side the water. At anchor, your vision polar is restricted, and you might not see the sand barge bearing down on you, dragging its anchor. Much easier to pop your head out a hatch, especially at 33’ long. In a marina, you are either looking into someone else's windows, or they are looking into yours.


    I prefer small, usually oval, ports in these side boards, rather like Kylix shown here. The jury is still out on whether they should open or not, i dislike seas slopping in, but a cross breeze is nice in harbor.


    For ventilation and light, i prefer a ‘butterfly’ hatch over the main cabin, dorade vents everywhere else. These can be traditional glass in a wood frame, or even glass silicon bonded flush to a frame so water does not collect anywhere. Add metal (or glass fiber/carbon fiber?) bars to taste. i would even integrate a ‘booby hatch’ like that on the pilot schooner into the butterfly hatch to give improved headroom abaft the mast.


    Ive already commented on my choice of rig for this classy cruiser, to make it fast and easy to handle short handed. Note; raising the freeboard, especially forward may raise the hackles of some. In fact, a light boat like this should always be ‘wind-rode’ and not tide-rode, except in a calm, so the extra windage is immaterial. The windage of the rig tends to dominate too, especially with the fore mast right forward. In a seaway, it is important to not take ‘green’ over the bow, as it is very destructive. Bow height and speed are two of the factors preventing this.


    Note; when anchoring single handed when sailing, drop/handle the anchor from the stern or helm position, using a bridal from the forward roller to eventually secure it. The anchor can be recovered from the stern too, no need to go to the foredeck when single handed. Conversely, when you have a crew, it is always better to yell confusing instructions from the helm, it amuses the others.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,436

    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    On the subject of leeboards. I. Think they are one solution to leeway. I really like the space in my cabin. The downside is you have to raise and lower when you tack. I cannot argue with someone who thinks they are ugly. To each their own.
    As to cabin lay out. I would very specifically build less sleeping berths. Cruising storage is more important than trying to sleep 4 or 6, which probably will never happen. Have good sleeping accommodation for two and lots of storage.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    1,033

    Default Re: Reuel Parker's Sea Bright 33

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigadog View Post
    I saw that one or a similar one. They are cool boats, but draw nearly 4 feet. The place I would keep this boat is called Turtle Sound on Crooked Island, and the entrance is about 2 1/2 feet.
    Is an AS29 targeted to this spec?....or is the jury still out re: bluewater


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