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Thread: Lug yawl cruising design

  1. #1
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    Default Lug yawl cruising design

    I've been doing a bit of a study on the AS29 and am a bit impressed by it, and I think I even like how it looks now - but during my reading I came across this design on "Boat Design" (I think by an amateur?) and I've been a quite mesmerized by it - like a bird of the sea - and it's like there's aspects of lots of other designs in it - from Bolger to LFH to Oughtred to Irens to Sinbad the Sailor - there's a Haiku, a Romp, an LFH ketch, a Roxanne and an Asian quarter deck all in there
    The rig might be high (at risk?) - but it's an impressive concept

    Last edited by Sayla; 05-29-2013 at 02:29 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    An updated Freedom 40 perhaps?
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    My first impression was a Hoyt design (freedom range). Fore sail (main?) looks way too forward on this type of shallow hull. I wouldnt want to run downwind in a heay sea and wind in it.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    I'd prefer Nigel Irens' Roxanne.



    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    That does not look tough enough for the ocean.
    but I am spoiled and scared

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    I don't think those are actually lug sails, either, not having a yard. I am guessing that they might be classified more like a sleeved gunter.

    I do most certainly like the cat-yawl rig for the small boats, but I wonder if it is really ideal for larger boats of this size, as it lacks some of the flexibility of hoisting all the different sail configurations for those long tradewinds passages, storms, light wind drifting, etc. What is prudent and convenient for a little boat doesn't always transfer over to a big 'un with more available options. Roxane seems like a practical upper size limit for a lug-yawl yacht. (and yes, I'd sure like to get one of those for Christmas)

    But the concept is certainly striking and interesting.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    James comments pretty much sum up my thoughts as well. Would like to know more about it......

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    The picture is pretty. I like the unstayed advantage. But look at what happens when that sail is lowered-- the spar/yard/gaff is longer than the boom and the battens are now coming down pointed at your head and the deck. Putting a nice harbor furl on that puppy would be some work. Dumping it in a squall might be a real nightmare!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    The main looks like a high-aspect version of the curved-yard rig on the Norseboat camp-cruiser:



    The advantage would be having a shorter mast and a rig that's easier to strike and stow. But the craft pictured looks a bit larger which might make that difficult. Nor would it be suited to rowing.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    I don't think those are actually lug sails, either, not having a yard. I am guessing that they might be classified more like a sleeved gunter.

    I do most certainly like the cat-yawl rig for the small boats, but I wonder if it is really ideal for larger boats of this size, as it lacks some of the flexibility of hoisting all the different sail configurations for those long tradewinds passages, storms, light wind drifting, etc. What is prudent and convenient for a little boat doesn't always transfer over to a big 'un with more available options. Roxane seems like a practical upper size limit for a lug-yawl yacht. (and yes, I'd sure like to get one of those for Christmas)

    But the concept is certainly striking and interesting.
    The designer used the term 'Junk Yawl' and that was the search term that I used (checking out junks sails)

    With that tender at the transom the boat looks >40 ft - but I was also thinking that an upper limit for this sort of thing was something like Roxanne (strength of rig etc), and cat boats generally topped out around that size too. This design might be workable if sized as a trailerable weekender (which is my current study size) - like a stylish TS24 or something - perhaps around 27' x 8' at 2.5ton (ballast partially water), and with a lower aspect sail, but still clear of the cockpit.
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    Last edited by Sayla; 05-29-2013 at 08:41 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    If you go to the boat design forum, he describes his plan some more. It is related to Hoyts offset lug rig.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    I'm certainly a fan of the unstayed cat yawl (ketch) rig (note atavar).
    To an extent. the unstayed sails are self-reefing, in that they blade out in puffs if you got the flex right, and if you reef the main, the COE doesn't move much.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Lug yawl cruising design

    It seems that the design has a sleeved sail with the yard inside the sleeve and running parallel to the mast for some distance below the "throat." I do not see a way to lower the top half of the sail without somehow opening up the sleeve, or furling the sail to the yard.

    If that is a vang at the base of the main/foremast, it is at a pretty low angle to the boom, creating a huge amount of force on the attachments.

    Does not seem to be well thought through.

    Brian

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