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Thread: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

  1. #36
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hi all!

    I am new to boating and I have attempted to build my first two sheet boat using the Flywood design posted by flo-mo on his website. I used the offsets posted on flo-mo's website:flywood-rowboat-panel-offsets_orig.png



    So the problem is two-fold: I purchased 8mm plywood instead of 4mm, and its not marine grade, so i believe its possible it has voids and may be more difficult to bend.

    Given this, I had the idea to cut the panels so further so I didn't have to bend the plywood a lot, especially against the grain of the wood. So my question is, if I continue the cut until to the bottom of the sheet (i.e. (X:Y) (0cm:213.5cm) from the bottom right corner as shown from the picture I linked, and similar for the top side also) will this boat still assemble in a manageable way? I know it wont be the same but will it work?

    Here is my change (the red line):

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/149609.../shares/21UZ10


    So i guess the boat will have a flat bottom now. Let me know if this is any thing I should know that will prohibit me from doing this.

    Thanks for the design and help!

    P.S. Any advice on fiberglass work? How do I make the peanut butter to fill in the holes, sanding, etc. Maybe a link to a forum about that.

  2. #37
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    May 2009
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hi jcarabet,

    I am sorry but I have to tell you that your plan won't work. In no way by simply adding a cut like you proposed there is a chance to obtain a decent hull. Don't do it.

    Also I am quit sure that 8 mm plywood is simply not suited for the two sheet Flywood.

    I recommend to have a look at my Big Guide rowboat which although not ideal could be made of 8 mm plywood.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Flo-mo,

    Ahh ok. I'll consider doing that design instead, or maybe I will buy 4mm.

    I have some follow up questions. Sorry for my ignorance!

    But after I join all the pieces of plywood with fiberglass/epoxy, is it neccesary to cover the entire boat (interior/exterior) with fiberglass or is it sufficient to just put some type of clear coat laquer or paint? I assume it depends on the the thickness of the plywood also?

    I am not looking to make a perfect boat, but something that will work for my first try (and not make me go bankrupt! hahaha).

    Any suggestions on further reinforncement with fiberglass, laquer, finishing, etc. would be great!

    Thanks again. and if im posting this to the wrong area let me know and I'll move my discussion.

    Joe

  4. #39
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    Dec 2015
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    Adelaide, South Australia
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hi Flo Mo
    I'm inspired. I also like the idea of a 50/50 canoe. Between the Romax 16, Flywood 2 and Flywood Fast rowboat, which would be the most stable under sail, say 40-ish feet?

  5. #40
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hey again,

    So I thought I would share some photos from my summer boat build. I ended up using the 8mm plywood because I already bought it and just made the cut as I have previously showed. But it turned out ok for my first try i think!

    Let me know what you think! Thanks for the design too, flo-mo! Even though I messed up from the beginning. hahaha.

    https://flic.kr/s/aHskrwi3QX

  6. #41
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by scottgze View Post
    Hi Flo Mo
    I'm inspired. I also like the idea of a 50/50 canoe. Between the Romax 16, Flywood 2 and Flywood Fast rowboat, which would be the most stable under sail, say 40-ish feet?
    Romax 16 is the most stable closely followed by Flywood 2.
    Flywood Fast rowboat is distinctively less stable than the other two designs.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by jcarabet View Post
    Hey again,

    So I thought I would share some photos from my summer boat build. I ended up using the 8mm plywood because I already bought it and just made the cut as I have previously showed. But it turned out ok for my first try i think!

    Let me know what you think! Thanks for the design too, flo-mo! Even though I messed up from the beginning. hahaha.

    https://flic.kr/s/aHskrwi3QX
    Congrats on your build -- you definitely created a design of your own.

  8. #43
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    Dec 2015
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Thanks Flo Mo. Looks like I was right, so I'll be making plywood dust today!

  9. #44
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    The one sheet flywood. I am already thinking of ways to stretch this little beauty by a foot and a bit to accommodate us larger blokes.
    I would like to keep the beam the same to retain its double-paddle, kayak like nature, but that beam needs to be distributed along a greater length to provide a fraction more stability.

    DSCF0408-1.jpg

  10. #45
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    but that beam needs to be distributed along a greater length to provide a fraction more stability.
    Have you experimented with different seating heights? When boats get that light and narrow, sitting as little as one inch lower can make a surprising difference. It looks in the photo as though you could be lower and still have good clearance over the gunnels.
    -Dave

  11. #46
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    Have you experimented with different seating heights? When boats get that light and narrow, sitting as little as one inch lower can make a surprising difference. It looks in the photo as though you could be lower and still have good clearance over the gunnels.
    Yes we experimented with some 3/4" foam sheets as temporary seats. My wife has no problem with two stacked sheets but I feel a little too wobbly, one sheet for me feels much better. It is nothing dramatic, I can manage perfectly well on flat water with two sheets but I would like to take the stretched version out to sea. For that I plan a closed off fore- and aft deck and the remaining cockpit should have some sort of self draining floor, limiting how low I can make the seat.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hi everyone! I am new in this forum and also in boat building. I never built a boat, so I have zero experience. After a lot of web searches I decided to make a stitch and glue canoe, since this technique seems the easiest to me.
    I found flo-mo website and I fell in love with his projects. I would really like to make a 2 sheets flywood canoe. The thing that worries me is that this project has few junctions with respect to the classic stitch and glue constructions. It seems to me that the wood should bend a lot, and I'm afraid it could crack. Reading in the forum I discovered that someone already failed this project.

    Do you think that this project is suitable for a newbie like me?


    PS: please forgive me for my english, I'm not a native speaker

  13. #48
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by steferrari91 View Post
    Hi everyone! I am new in this forum and also in boat building. I never built a boat, so I have zero experience. After a lot of web searches I decided to make a stitch and glue canoe, since this technique seems the easiest to me.
    I found flo-mo website and I fell in love with his projects. I would really like to make a 2 sheets flywood canoe. The thing that worries me is that this project has few junctions with respect to the classic stitch and glue constructions. It seems to me that the wood should bend a lot, and I'm afraid it could crack. Reading in the forum I discovered that someone already failed this project.

    Do you think that this project is suitable for a newbie like me?


    PS: please forgive me for my english, I'm not a native speaker
    It will depend on the quality of the plywood. The face ply should be about the same thickness as the core in the case of 3-ply. Thin face veneer with a thick core is likely to give more problems.
    The Core Sound day-sailers and Spindrift dinghies use the same method to end the chine and create a nice shape for the bow. They use 6mm plywood. to prevent cracking the area around the end of the chine cut is reinforced.

    I am sure 4mm ply will work well for the 2-sheet canoe. If 4mm is to flexible for such a long canoe then you can always reinforce with glass once you have the correct hull shape.

    If you are not confident in your skills then there is the option of very similar canoes from B and B Yacht designs. The plans are not free but they will have much more detailed construction guidance.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskeyfox View Post
    It will depend on the quality of the plywood. The face ply should be about the same thickness as the core in the case of 3-ply. Thin face veneer with a thick core is likely to give more problems.
    The Core Sound day-sailers and Spindrift dinghies use the same method to end the chine and create a nice shape for the bow. They use 6mm plywood. to prevent cracking the area around the end of the chine cut is reinforced.

    I am sure 4mm ply will work well for the 2-sheet canoe. If 4mm is to flexible for such a long canoe then you can always reinforce with glass once you have the correct hull shape.

    If you are not confident in your skills then there is the option of very similar canoes from B and B Yacht designs. The plans are not free but they will have much more detailed construction guidance.
    Hi whiskeyfox, thank you so much for your reply. it seems to me that the flywood project has a certain probability of failure. I'm not a boat builder, I have other hobbies in my life. I think that I will try this experience just once. If the plywood cracks when i'm bending it, I don't think that I will spend more time/money for a second attempt.
    Maybe I can go for a more traditional project. Among all flo-mo projects, the one that makes me more confident is "romax 16". It has more junctions and I don't think that the wood has some Dangerous strains/tensions.
    Maybe romax 16 can be a better option?

    ps: I see that you made the one sheet flywood canoe. It's wonderful!

  15. #50
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by steferrari91 View Post
    Hi whiskeyfox, thank you so much for your reply. it seems to me that the flywood project has a certain probability of failure. I'm not a boat builder, I have other hobbies in my life. I think that I will try this experience just once. If the plywood cracks when i'm bending it, I don't think that I will spend more time/money for a second attempt.
    Maybe I can go for a more traditional project. Among all flo-mo projects, the one that makes me more confident is "romax 16". It has more junctions and I don't think that the wood has some Dangerous strains/tensions.
    Maybe romax 16 can be a better option?

    ps: I see that you made the one sheet flywood canoe. It's wonderful!
    The probability of failure should be very low with the flywood series. There is always the unexpected flaw in the odd sheet of plywood, but if you use decent quality plywood you should not have any problems.

    You may be confusing the tortured plywood birch bark style canoe ( http://flo-mo.weebly.com/gorewood-14-solo-canoe.html ) with the straight stitch and glue. The tortured plywood designs put far more stress on the plywood. The failure was due to the high stress and poor quality plywood used in a different style of construction. The boats pictured in the gorewood link were built with a better quality plywood using the same plans.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  16. #51
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Quote Originally Posted by steferrari91 View Post
    Hi everyone! I am new in this forum and also in boat building. I never built a boat, so I have zero experience. After a lot of web searches I decided to make a stitch and glue canoe, since this technique seems the easiest to me.
    I found flo-mo website and I fell in love with his projects. I would really like to make a 2 sheets flywood canoe. The thing that worries me is that this project has few junctions with respect to the classic stitch and glue constructions. It seems to me that the wood should bend a lot, and I'm afraid it could crack. Reading in the forum I discovered that someone already failed this project.

    Do you think that this project is suitable for a newbie like me?


    PS: please forgive me for my english, I'm not a native speaker
    Hi Stefano,

    I am sorry for my late reply -- I have been busy lately moving to a new workshop.

    My experience with building a Flywood boat is limited to a still unfinished Flywood One Sheet Canoe.





    It is made of 4 mm okoume plywood/exterior grade and luckily I had no problems with the plywood, which is remarkable because it is exactly the same plywood I used for the miserably failed attempt to build this Gorewood canoe: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...e-no-happy-end

    The stress for 4 mm plywood building a Flywood 2-sheeter should be less than for building the significantly smaller one-sheet design and definitely less compared to the Gorewood technique.
    So I think it is fair to say, provided that you use plywood of reasonable quality (grain direction of the outer veneers orientated to the length of the sheet), chances are that you should be able to successfully build the 2-sheet Flywood rowboat.

    If in doubt maybe contact the builders of these boats, which are similar versions of this design, for more information:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ean-plan/page2
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...017&highlight=

    If i understand correctly, Algis is right now building another 2-sheet Flywood: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater



    Kind regards
    Stefan

  17. #52
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    I don't know how to thank all of you for your precious answers and clarifications. I still think that the assembling process could be easier for the romax in respect with the flywood canoe. One step worries me in particular: joining the two halves that make up the side of the hull:

    https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JPUlI2cTJ2MS13

    Especially because I don't have a lot of tools/clamps to keep everything in place.
    Maybe I'm underestimating my skills, but the romax project makes me more confident. Is the flywood significantly better then the romax? Is it aesthetically more pleasing? Does it behave better in the water?
    I apologize if I expose all these doubts and concerns to you, and I thank you again for being so helpful.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    178

    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Hello Stefan, I just wanted to express my appreciation for what you are doing. Your construction is as clean and the photography is really good. The photos of the models are what drew me in. Some of the shapes are very interesting and appealing.
    One question; do the joints in the panels really have to be glued when the panels are bent? It seems like the joints could be carefully butt glued on the flat and the hull assembled before taping the joints. I have found butt joints to be unbelievably strong with the right technique, good epoxy and a bit of a post-cure.
    Anyway, I quite like what you are doing and it seems like selling full-sized patterns is one hell of a lot better than running a kit business.

  19. #54
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    Apr 2012
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    My above post was meant for flo-mo. I assumed your name was Stefan because two posts above was signed Stefan. Hope I didn't screw that up. Really like your boats anyway.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: May I introduce you to the Flywood Family

    Please forgive me again but I have another doubt. In the 2 sheets flywood project, where can I find the lenght of the spacer in the middle of the boat? Looking at the photos of the realizations (in particular this one: https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2629/3...093a173e9c.jpg) the boat looks quite wide.

    The width of the boat gives me further doubts. Should this boat be used exclusively with oars? or can I also use a paddle? I don't really like the idea of travelling backwards... I want to use a boat with a paddle.

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