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Thread: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Looking good!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    We received a batch of silicon bronze screws recently. I was able to spend a couple of hours tonight wrapping up a few small items that were waiting on the screws. All of the new ribs in the boat are now properly fastened to the bilge stingers, and 120 more screws were added to the most recently installed ribs. Small stuff I know, but feels good to cross something off the list.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    A previous owner of our boat had installed a drip pan under the engine and transmission at some point. Good idea. Unfortunately they made it from fairly thin (.020 or so) aluminum sheeting with a hideous wood grain pattern on it. I have a local shop that does really nice work with aluminum as well as copper. I would love to have a nice copper pan made. Is there an advantage or disadvantage to either material from a galvanic corrosion or any other other standpoint?

    [IMG][/IMG]

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    This afternoon we cut the tops off all of the long ribs that we installed through the covering boards. We also removed six more ribs from the starboard side in preparation for steaming again this coming weekend. In addition, it's now official...this project is a complete rebuild - the last untouched system on board - the central air conditioning, was removed to make way for ribs. Nothing but the keel remains untouched. For the love of God please let the keel be as good as I think it is.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I am still looking for input for the material I should use for the drip pan under my motor. I have determined that from a galvanic corrosion standpoint, a copper pan would be very compatible with the silicon bronze fastenings in the hull. The cost of the pan is more than twice that of an aluminum pan, which is pretty far from the broinze on the galvanic compatibility charts I have found. How concerned should I be with the material selection for thei pan. It is possible that the pan could be in contact with bilge water, which may be in contact with bronze fasteners...

    I want to do the right thing but not spend twice as much as I have to. Any opinions?

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    We had a great day today working on the boat. We had prepared for the installation of 7 ribs. This time we took Tom's advice and soaked the ribs overnight to see if the added moisture would make the ribs more pliable when hot. This, combined with several tricks we have learned over the last several attempts, made the 7 ribs go in so smoothly (In just over an hour!!), that we decided to take out three more old ribs. We had cut a total of 14 for the task expecting breakage.

    She must be anxious to be put back in the water cause she gave up the three ribs in 30 minutes and we replaced them with brandy new ones in another 20 minutes!. A total of ten ribs went in before 3pm and we were not even exhausted. Feels like we have earned dinner and a movie tonight. Perhaps tomorrow we will remove the sole framing and planking in the aft section outside the salon in preparation for the 14 sisters we are adding back there. Happy, happy day.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Better replank her tomorrow while the stars are all aligned!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    The starboard side now matches the port side. 44 new ribs in so far. Only 25 originals left in the boat. We're very excited about our progress recently. You can see in the pics below that we have refined our process pretty well. Between pre soaking the ribs to add extra moisture (thanks Tom), using a post pounder to drive the ribs into the hull, new guide boards that we installed to help the ribs make the turn in the bilge smoothly, and clamping the top of the rib to the top plank and pounding it tight against the hull, we've got this thing down.

    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

    We also removed the lower plank on the transom to inspect the framing behind it. Everything was remarkably hard and solid. The lower plank will be repalced because the aluminum brackets that held the swim platform on corroded and ate into the wood a bit.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    You lucked out on the transom. We pulled the lower plank and found the transom timber were pretty much dust...Ended up redoing the entire transom ($$ouch!)

    Your reframing looks Great!! She should be good for another 75 years!

    Cheers,
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Great progress. Really nice to see another Richardson being brought back to life!
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Thanks Tom. It has been a slow learning curve but we are so pleased that we have decided to do sll of this the right way, and as completely as we know how. We love this boat and are excited about the progress too.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I have been told that the planking on my boat (top sides) is cypress. My local distributor carries Atlantic cedar in a clear enough grade for planking. Is this wood the same in terms of physical properties and rot resistance as cypress?

    I am nearing the point of purchasing mahogany for the top strake and covering boards. What species is best for this? The distributor appears to carry Lyptus, Fiji, Genuine, and Phillipine.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Personally, my preference is genuine (AKA Honduras) mahogany. It has a much tighter and more uniform grain than African and Philippine mahogany, which can be somewhat stringy.

    Never heard of Fiji Mahogany, and Lyptus is not, AFIK mahogany.

    What is the rest of the cabin?

    I made this chest a few years back (my first real woodworking effort) the top, rails and stiles are Genuine Mahogany, the panels are Philippine ply (actually Meranti Hydrotek)

    ...This is with with about 9 coats of Epifanes matte...and lots and lots of sanding...





    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I suspected that genuine mahogany was the correct answer given that it is $12.00 a bf. I do not know what the rest of the cabin is made from since I don't have enough experience with the three species to tell the difference. I intend to bring a piece of the material I have to the guy I am working with to see if he can determine what I currently have.

    I have been told that Richardson used cedar (Cypress) to plank their hulls with, with the exception of the sheer strake. For this, I am told, mahogany was used. I suppose I need to determine if this is true, and if so why? If Atlantic cedar is comparable to what is currently on my boat's top sides, and the sheer strake does not need to be of mahogany, I can replace my sheer strakes with Altlantic and save enough to do the covering boards in genuine mahogany.

    Anyone have some thoughts??

    BTW, the chest is beautiful. I love the joinery.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    In my somewhat limited experience Cypress is a little heavier than cedar, but there are sub-varieties, so that could have been an anomaly.

    For mahoganies, the colors and grain textures are somewhat telling, although with lots of varnish, it's hard to tell. African and Luan (Philippine) tend to have a somewhat stringy structure with relatively large long pores. Genuine has similar elongated pores but they are much smaller. Both AM and Luan tend to the lighter, pinker side while AM tends to be darker and a little more orange.

    THis might help:
    http://www.wood-database.com/wood-identification/

    HTH
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Can anyone give me an opinion of Sapele to be used as a planking material above the waterline? My local house has both Sapele and genuine mahogany. The genuine costs 2x. If the Sapele is acceptable I may use it for sheer strakes, and possible covering boards??

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I used a lot of Sapele in MAKOTO's cabinets and bulkheads. it is very workable as long as the grain is not interlocked. If it is, then it is nasty to plane. I found a lot of it with really nice straight grain, and some later with interlocked grain. In my experience ti is somewhat harder than Genuine Mahogany (Janka 1500 vs 800), so it may be somewhat difficult to bend if the planks have any tight curves. Probably make great covering boards.

    I'd like to hear what others think too.

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I would like to hear from others as well. Seems you may be my only reader Scott! lol.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Reading on but unable to offer meaningful input What did you work out with the drip pan under the engine and the galvanic corrosion etc? I take it you are just replacing what's there as it doesn't look very nice... I like your thread so far too, very well documented

    Cheers for posting
    My First Boat Build:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...acgregor-Canoe
    Iain Oughtred - Macgregor Canoe - 15 foot

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Thanks for the attentioon, I was getting lonely! lol. I have not yet replaced the ugly drip pan. Currently it is aluminum and there do not appear to be any issues. I will likely go with aluminum and isolate it a bit by using tall rubber mounts to keep it up off the frames / keel and keep it out of the water. I love the idea of a copper pan but given the cost and invisible location it may not make sense.

    Thanks for the commentary on the thread. I am hoping to look back on all of this fondly very soon.... for now, onward with the reframing!

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Can you remake the aluminum pan? Maybe following Ledger's approach? I would think aluminum would last longer than copper anyway.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I could remake the pan in place as it is now. I am not familiar with "Ledger's approach"...

    I was thinking that if I got accurate measurements I could have a new pan fabricated that was of a much heavier gauge. It would have structural integrity and more options for mounting, as opposed to a thin layer of folded sheet metal that relies on the wood framing as a support substrate.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Jim Ledger is making a phenomenally well crafted boat...Here is the part about the engine pan

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...catboat/page43
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Youv'e made good progress!

    FYI--Sapele doesn't steam bend worth spit. It's pretty though and rot resistance is good.
    Chuck Thompson

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post
    Youv'e made good progress!

    FYI--Sapele doesn't steam bend worth spit. It's pretty though and rot resistance is good.
    Thanks Chuck. I have to replace the sheer strake. There's some decent twist aft in the tumble home, and at the bow as well. Do you think Sapele is too stiff to take a twist at 7/8" thick x 6 - 7" wide?

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Jim Ledger is making a phenomenally well crafted boat...Here is the part about the engine pan

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...catboat/page43
    Thanks for pointing out that thread Scott. That's some very impressive work. The pan that I will have made will likely be a shallow (3") pan with a basic rectangular shape. Nothing quite as elaborate as this example.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    I would try it. Based on my limited experience, I would be concerned. However, my experiments were very limited. I definitely would buy one piece and do an experiment before buying any quantity. Good luck.
    Chuck Thompson

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post
    I would try it. Based on my limited experience, I would be concerned. However, my experiments were very limited. I definitely would buy one piece and do an experiment before buying any quantity. Good luck.
    And make sue the grain is nice and straight. I found the wood was harder in the curly grained sections. SO much that sometimes it would chip out along the curved grain lines. Most of it, though is very easy to work with. Smells a bit odd.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    It does smell funny doesn't it.
    Chuck Thompson

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    We are waiting on some more white oak for ribs. Also waiting on some Port Orford Cedar on order at a local supplier. We decided to tie up some loose ends while waiting. We removed the sole in the patio area outside the aft salon door. We removed some additional planking that had some issues as well. Glad to make progress, but looking forward to when we are putting things bac together instead of taking them apart... onward.

    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    And I thought I had cut a lot of bungs!

    Yikes!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  32. #102
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post
    It does smell funny doesn't it.
    Yeah, sort of an indescribable sweet meaty smell...not bad, but odd...
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    And I thought I had cut a lot of bungs!

    Yikes!
    When we are done we will have installed just over 2500 screws in exterior of the hull. Christine cut those bungs in less than an hour, using a bench top drill press that we picked up for 30 bucks. We figure she's about 25% of the way finished cutting. Then we get to install them!

  34. #104
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    There is a great boat show happening this weekend in Salem MA. It is our favorite show because you are asked to board every vessel, meet with the owners, see the pictures of their restoration efforts, and hear the history of the boats. The level of interaction with the boats and their stewards make this a unique experience. Hope to see some of you there! http://www.by-the-sea.com/bacbfestival/

  35. #105
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    Default Re: Restoration of a 1935 Richardson Cruisabout

    You're doing a fine job, Tangusso, those new frames look great in there.

    A couple of thoughts...

    I see you are getting some Port Orfors cedar for your planking. Although the northern white cedar is a fine wood it's somewhat soft and difficult to find without knots. The Crosbys, catboat building family on Cape Cod, used Cypress exclusively, considering it stronger than the more locally available white cedar. It does soak up a lot of water, though, and the quality of Cypress is not supposed to be what it once was as far as rot resistance is concerned. The PO cedar should be fine.

    I certainly hope the Sapele is suitably durable, as my transom is made of it.

    One advantage of fabricating a drip pan of aluminum is that the metal can be thicker, 1/8" or 3/16", which will take a very long time to corrode through. It also makes a stiffer assembly that's easier to anchor with a few fasteners. My own pan is high enough in the bilge that bilge water contact won't be a problem. It's fastened down with stainless steel and doesn't make any contact with any other metal. It's fairly complex shape was dictated only by the tight clearance between the engine and the keel.

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