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Thread: Router Use Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Default Router Use Question

    I was wondering if anyone uses a router with a flush cut bit ,like to trim off excess plywood at sheer clamp or chine log.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Rapp View Post
    I was wondering if anyone uses a router with a flush cut bit ,like to trim off excess plywood at sheer clamp or chine log.
    Yes... but you have to be careful. They are designed for 90 degree corners. A more acute angle will leave a little extra still hanging. A more obtuse angle can take off more than you want.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    there are some trim routers that have a tiltable base. Its still hard to keep it from cutting wrong because if you rotate the router slightly it will change the angle of the cut. But it is possible to flush trim with a router when the angle isnt a perfect 90 deg.
    Freudian slips : when you say one thing but mean your mother.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2012
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    I like the idea of a tiltable base,I may have to get one

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Yes, it's true enough that there are tilt-base trim routers. Keep in mind, though, that the angle will change as you progress along the cut. You'd have to keep changing the angle, or cut the most acute angle first, then change the angle and cut other areas, etc. Tedious. By the time you mess around with that, and misjudge once or twice the wrong way... you'll find that it will have been quicker to cut to leave a bit of overhang, then bring it down to fit with a sharp plane (or a belt sander, if you're handy with one).
    Last edited by David G; 12-10-2012 at 11:03 PM.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    387

    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Yes, it's true enough that there are tilt-base trim routers. Keep in mind, though, that the angle will change as you progress along the cut. You'd have to keep changing the angle, or cut the most acute angle first, then change the angle and cut other areas, etc. Tedious. By the time you mess around with that, and misjudge once or twice the wrong way... you'll find that it will have been quicker to cut to leave a bit of overhand, then bring it down to fit with a sharp plane (or a belt sander, if you're handy with one).
    +1 Don't even waste a minute trying to trim this joint by machine. In this case your eye will exceed the accuracy of any machine. Cut close with a saw, trim with a plane and sand or rasp to final dimension. This is what boatbuilding is all about.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Yevsky View Post
    +1 Don't even waste a minute trying to trim this joint by machine. In this case your eye will exceed the accuracy of any machine. Cut close with a saw, trim with a plane and sand or rasp to final dimension. This is what boatbuilding is all about.
    Of all power tools, routers seem to allow you to make mistakes the fastest. One second you've got a plan, the next second you've got a mistake.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Yes, but why? Faster, cheaper, quieter, less messy to do it by hand with a plane. You're going to cut to near the line with a saw anyway, right? Or were you thinking of a 3hp router with a 1"Dia. flush cutting bit, that you could use to just hog through everything and gnaw it all down to the line, like throwing a tree into one of those massive chippers that they use these days to clear building lots?

  9. #9
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    Default

    I hate routers anyway but this seems like the worst possible way to trim the sheer plank.

    Denny Wolfe
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    For up to 1/4" ply, I found this was a good time to have some fun with my drawknife. A few good swipes to get it down close, then finish with a block plane and sandpaper.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Drawknife, block plane, smoothing plane (Nos. 4, 4-1/2, etc.) will all work well. Make sure the iron is truly sharp, and you will save time if you pause to hone the iron frequently. No need for the fire-breathing router.

    Power tools earn their keep in certain applications, but I'm learning that hand tools, when wielded with even modest skill, are often faster, more accurate, safer, and far less noisy/dusty. The dust issue with routers really annoys me.

    I'm very close to selling off a lot of my power tools. I'll keep the bandsaw. The drill press is a convenience, especially for occasional metal work. I'll keep a few power hand tools--hypoid saw, jig saw. The rest can go--routers, table saws, jointers, planers, radial arm, etc. I'm not a production shop. For one-off stuff, boats or otherwise, hand tools are often better, faster, and safer.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by orbb View Post
    Of all power tools, routers seem to allow you to make mistakes the fastest. One second you've got a plan, the next second you've got a mistake.
    Yep. Then you realize it would have been just as fast and less costly to use hand tools. I use a router a fair bit, but only for repetitive work mostly in straight lines and constant angles. I also have a zip saw that has a router base for it... I find it handy for doing small delicate recess work, but that's rare.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Ohio
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Rapp View Post
    I was wondering if anyone uses a router with a flush cut bit, like to trim off excess plywood at sheer clamp or chine log.
    I made a simple router fixture when I was building Alaya that does this quite well and easily. She had about 600' of overhang that needed trimming. Using a router made short work of what would have been a
    tedious and time consuming job. It's not worth the effort for a single layer of ply on a 10' dinghy, but if you're doing a 38' boat cold molded out of 3 layers of ply it's another matter.
    If anyone is interested or has the need, I'll take some photos and post a description of the jig.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Routers have a great way of turning simple trim jobs into massive expensive repair jobs in the wink of an eye.
    I find that the older I get the more I lean towards grabbing a hand tool than a hand held power tool. The big stationary tools are great for production work and I couldnt live without them; ripping a sheet of 3/4" ply with a hand saw would get tiresome quickly....
    The key is to spend good money on good tools and having the patience and taking the time to keep them sharp. I see a lot of guys struggle with cheap, dul hand tools and grab a power tool out of frustration and impatience.
    Well tuned and sharp saws, planes, spokeshaves, what have you are a pleasure to use and are genrally what separate craftsmen from mechanics.

    Please note that I am NOT disparaging "Mechanics"; fitters, engine and boilermen......

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Router Use Question

    Quote Originally Posted by orbb View Post
    Of all power tools, routers seem to allow you to make mistakes the fastest. One second you've got a plan, the next second you've got a mistake.
    I know this from experience, other than interior trim a router has no place in a boat building shop. There are exceptions to the rule but anything that goes throught he router goes through before it becomes part of the boat, never after.
    In fact, if you can saw a penciled line, apply glue, drive nails, and bring a modest measure of patience to the task, you can build and launch a smart and able craft in as few as 40 work hours. You need not be driven by lack of tools, materials, skills, or time to abandon in frustration a project you conceived in a spirit of pleasurable anticipation.

    -Dynamite Payson

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