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Thread: Rebuilding "Haabet"

  1. #456
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    Dec 2012
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    We really want to get the mizzen mast up again soon, so we have to get the wire shrouds finished.
    Since the first set of seizings didn't do the job very well, we delivered the shrouds to a company that makes rigging and lifting gear for the offshore industry and asked them to fix it for us. They had them for a couple of weeks before they called back and said they couldn't manage. The wire rope was to stiff, so they didn't manage to bend it around the thimbles. With the array of tools and hydraulic presses they have I guess that translates to "this job is to small for us to be bothered with."

    I got some good tips from a rigger at Hardanger Fartøyvernsenter, and from "The riggers apprentice" by Brion Toss.

    I don't know what other people use their living rooms for, but after we decided to ditch the TV, ours has seen a lot of different activities. Right now it is the riggers loft.

    First we bent the wires around the thimbles. This was done by hand as we don't have anything like a riggers vise. A lot of huffing and puffing and grimaces, but we got it done. Who needs a gym...

    I started out by attaching the thimble to the wire rope with a really tight hemp twine seizing. I then bent the wire rope around the thimble and Irene temporarily fastened it with plastic strips. We then gradually moved the strips down towards the thimble as I squeezed the wire together. I then held the wire firmly to one side of the thimble with plumbers pliers and did a seizing there before I did the same on the other side. Lastly I squeezed the wires together with the pliers and seized them temporarily.



    To do the wire seizing we fastened the thimble in a vise. on the floor. I was standing on the wood plate to keep it from rotating. To put enough tension on the seizing wire, I used a serving board I made of oak. It was the hardest wood I had, but the wire is chewing it up so fast I probably have to make another one before we are done.



    I don't have any pictures of the actual work, as all four hand were occupied. Mine with the serving board, and Irenes' with the seizing wire.

    We used a mallet to really tighten the three rounds of wire holding the seizing together. I have a lot more confidence in these seizings than the previous ones, though there is still room for improvement. According to Brion Toss, the wire seizing is "the hardest knot to master and do well" We are using a 3mm seizing wire, which is a bit thicker than necessary, and it's a bit tricky to get it smooth. I just bought the same kind of wire that was used in the old seizings, but according to the charts, I could have used a thinner one.

    Last edited by Haabet; 06-25-2014 at 05:01 AM.

  2. #457
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    I used a serving board I made of oak. It was the hardest wood I had, but the wire is chewing it up so fast I probably have to make another one before we are done.
    When I was working as a rigger at Mystic Seaport, we used a seizing board cut from plate steel to do wire seizings. Not even liveoak would stand up to that kind of wear --and we did a lot of wire seizings.

    A piece of advice --and perhaps you're already doing this and I can't see it in the photos: try wrapping the service beneath the seizing with a narrow band of light canvas, just a turn or two, soaked in pine tar, to keep the wire from sinking into the service. It'll help the seizings to stay fair, too.

  3. #458
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    Aug 2005
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    San Diego
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Gret pics of the wire work. While I have a wee bit of experience with wire, my turn is coming up in the near future and its great to see others experiences (plus feedback) before I cut my teeth into similar work.
    Cheers,

    Brad Holderman
    Carpenter
    SV Cloudia 1934

  4. #459
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    Dec 2012
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    Bergen, Norway
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    A metal serving tool would have been nice, but we are a bit short on metal working tools. It only takes a couple of minutes to make a new serving board anyway, so I can live with that. ;-)




    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    A piece of advice --and perhaps you're already doing this and I can't see it in the photos: try wrapping the service beneath the seizing with a narrow band of light canvas, just a turn or two, soaked in pine tar, to keep the wire from sinking into the service. It'll help the seizings to stay fair, too.
    We didn't do this on the first ones we did, but on the later ones we used some cloth tape under the seizing. The service is so tight that the wire didn't really sink down into it, but maybe it helps in the long run.




    And just to complete the picture series. Tightening it up with the mallet.





    It's amazing how much force you can apply this way. Snapping the seizing wire would not have been very difficult.

    We are done with the seizings for the mizzen, but we are redoing all the seizings on the main mast shrouds too. Although they have shown no signs of slipping yet, they probably will if we leave them.

  5. #460
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Yesterday I started varnishing the wood i sanded last week. I always love putting on the first coat of varnish on bare wood.






    We brought the finished shrouds to the boat and left them on the dock. One guy working on his own boat noticed them and asked what they were made of. Looking like they do, he assumed they were bought that way, or that we had thread some kind of rope sock over the wire rope to make it look authentic. Irene explained the process of parcelling and serving, and his jaw dropped. Another guy overheard parts of the conversation and came over to listen. She ended up giving the parceling and serving lecture quite a few times, and in the end had a small crowd studying the shrouds. All of them had assumed it was some kind of factory made finish and agreed that only crazy people would do that by hand.

    It amuses me how amazed people are when you actually make something on your own.

    Today I went to a small farm sawmill in Hardanger to buy some more pine. They have been sawing timber for boats on this farm for centuries, and it is a small piece of heaven for a woodworker. Apart from all the nice pine, he had a couple of seriously massive oak logs waiting to be milled. Laying on the side, they were over my chest and must have been close to a thousand years old.




    The owner of the sawmill told me there was quite a demand for this kind of timber nowadays, and that he would probably have been a millionaire if he had done this full time. Then he added "But why would I want that? I like being a farmer"
    He also told me all the bark, sawdust and offcuts piled behind the mill attracted a lot of insects. The insects then attracted a lot of birds, and the birds built nests in the strangest places. He led me over to one of his machines and pointed at a nest with four little feather balls in it.
    "There is no way I'm starting any machinery before these guys have left" he said.





    A man who closes down a profitable business for months because of a birds nest is a man I like.

  6. #461
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Oh yes, that sawmill operator is very all right indeed. His mill isn't too bad, either.

    I like the image of the bemused crowd getting a lesson in parcelling and serving.

  7. #462
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Yesterday we finally got the mizzen back up, and it felt great.









    Haabet looks a lot better with two masts, I think. As you can see, we have covered the front windows with some tarp. There is a small water leak somewhere in the front of the wheelhouse. It only shows up in the right combination of wind direction and rain, so we haven't been able to pinpoint it yet. As it has been raining heavily the last couple of days, we have covered the front.

  8. #463
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Cabin leaking? Scrap her! JUST KIDDING. This restoration thread has been amazing to say the least. Fantastic old school work by a dedicated pair does the heart good.The closest I have come to Norway is the Epcot display but I have studied the Country and people and there are none hardier in the World. I really appreciate what you have done, the Vikings haven't anything on ye.

  9. #464
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Thank you Pungo Lee :-)

    The last couple of weeks have been too nice to spend time on the web (still is, but I'm spending some time here anyway).

    After getting the mizzen up, we spent some time redoing all the seizings on the main mast. Not only does it look a lot better, but it feels good to know they are sound.

    Last weekend, we sailed Haabet south to my parents place. It took us two days in fantastic weather. I should probably say we motored down as there was no hint of air movement.



    For a good part of the trip we were accompanied by the steamer Oster. She was moving only marginally faster than us, so we stayed together for hours.

    Oster was built in 1908 as an icebreaker and used in northern Norway, where towns would be isolated in winter when the sea froze.



    The first day, we sailed to Haugesund. This was a 13 hour trip from Bergen in our five knots. Before you get to Haugesund, you have to cross an open stretch called Sletta. Conditions here are often very rough. Not so this time. The ocean was flat as a mirror and the weather was warm.



    Past those small islands, next land is the east coast of Greenland.



    We got started a bit later than we planned to, and around 23.00 the sun was setting. I had to do a quick and dirty wiring job to get the nav lights up and running. Everything looks so peaceful and nice here, but notice those markers just left of the sun. Those shallows, named Bloksene have claimed manny a ship in stormy weather.

    In 1999 I was 18 years old and worked as a sailors apprentice on a North sea vessel. I had stepped of the quick ferry Sleipner in Haugesund to board the ship for my three week period at sea. The weather was pretty bad, and I was happy we were staying in port a few more days. Just after dinner, the bridge watchman came running down to the mess hall and told us Sleipner had hit Bloksene and was sinking. The bridge was handed over to me and the rest of the crew transferred to other ships to help in the rescue operation. This is a busy shipping lane and that probably saved a lot of people that night. Tankers and cargo ships lined up to form a wave breaker on the outside of the wreck site, and smaller craft searched the sea for survivors. It turned out that a design flaw in Sleipner meant that the life rafts did not deploy correctly in heavy waves and people had to jump directly in the water. 16 people died that night, and I think of it every time i sail past here.



    Haugesund is a nice little town with a lot of maritime history.


  10. #465
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    Devonport, Auckland NZ
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Stunning photography - thank you for sharing :-)
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  11. #466
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    Poole, Dorset, England
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    Default

    Lovely Colin Archer type and nice to see a sympathetic restoration. Great sea boat.

  12. #467
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    Nov 2013
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Just amazing, both the restoration and the pictures. I've followed since you first started posting, and I really appreciate the care and time you put into the posts on this site. Thank you for sharing.

  13. #468
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Glad to hear you like the thread. That makes it more fun to continue. :-)

    South from Haugesund, the shipping lane continues down the long strait of Karmsundet. The Island Karmøy shelters it from the big ocean and it has been the main route along the coast for thousands of years. For a very long time, that made it a centre of power. The massive burial mounds found in the area bare witness to the wealth of the rulers of past times. Whoever controlled Karmsundet, controlled all the shipping along the coast.

    The current stone church at Avaldsnes is over 800 years old, but there were others here before it. King Harald Hårfagre, who gathered all the smaller kingdoms of Norway into one country in 875 had his farm here, so this place is special in Norwegian history.



    The ocean was so calm this day it was surreal. The only waves were those formed by other ships. Some of those were quite bad though. We were passed by a North sea supply ship that produced some absolutely monstrous waves. Haabet rolls quite a bit when we take the waves sideways, so I turned the bow towards them just for comfort. As they moved closer, they towered above us and started breaking. Haabet took the first one quite nice, but then crashed right into the second one coming close behind. The wave washed over the deck and down into the forward hatch that was open in the nice calm weather. I have never seen such waves formed by a ship before and it was actually a bit scary. At least it was a lesson in not being to relaxed, even if the weather is calm.



    With only one other boat visible close to the horizon, we could just set the course and relax on deck. This is one of the nicest days I have ever had at sea.





    During this trip, we filled up the diesel tank for the second time, and could do some calculations on fuel consumption. The engine uses about 3 liters an hour. This gives us around 170 hours on one tank, so we can keep the engine running for about a week continuously without refueling. I am really happy with that.
    Last edited by Haabet; 08-07-2014 at 05:45 AM.

  14. #469
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Great photos and looks like an idyllic trip.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  15. #470
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    I re-read this thread from the beginning over the weekend. Definitely one of the best threads here ever. Thanks for sharing your project with us, you have a lovely boat and beautiful cruising grounds.

    Steven

  16. #471
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"



    I look at this image, imagine myself at sea with you and can almost feel and hear the boat moving through swells. Great thread. Thanks for sharing.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  17. #472
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    Poole, Dorset, England
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    Default

    The sea looks like what we call here in Poole, "flat as a witches titty". Days like that are a joy on the water. Happy sailing Haabet

  18. #473
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Thank you all!

    I hope you have had a nice summer ( or a pleasant winter for those of you on that side of the globe).

    We have had the warmest summer ever recorded in Norway with temperatures up to 34 degrees C (93 F).
    This is probably nothing special for a lot of you, but for us it is really extreme. Most of the time has been spent bathing and relaxing, as we have found it too warm to do much work.

    We have done a few things though.

    Earlier this summer I invested in a lathe. I have never done much woodturning, and I think last time was about 20 years ago. I have started out with some small projects to teach myself how to do this.

    My uncle cut down a large Ash tree in the garden, and i grabbed a few nice logs before they ended up as firewood.
    When the mizzen mast fell of last autumn, one of the belaying pins snapped in two. I thought making a new one would be a nice beginners project.

    Rough cut with a chainsaw.



    Getting there.



    Not perfect, but ok as a first trial I think.




    Haabet has been on the water for two summers now, so we took her out for some new anti fouling and zinc.



    There was surprisingly little growth on the hull. Just a few barnacles and some green slime.

    During the last year, we have found a few places on the hull that were leaking a bit. Shipwright Jørn recaulked these spots for us.



    Even though there was little growth on her, a clean hull and propeller gave us an extra knot. Going from five to six knots is noticeable.



    I was really happy to have all the little leaks fixed, and looked forward to a drier bilge. That is, of course, not what happened.

    When we put her back in the water after four days on land, she leaked like a sieve. The bilge pump was running constantly and we were thinking she might have sprung a fastener going back in. We started searching for an obvious leak, but could not find any. We concluded that the only likely reason for the leakage, was the hull drying in the heat and seams opening up. After three days on the water, the leaks are steadily getting smaller, supporting the drying out hypothesis. Nobody at the yard had ever seen a boat dry out that fast, but then again, nobody has seen a summer like this before up here. It amazes me that the seams could open up more in four days, than they did in ten months last year.

    At leas, this gave me a better understanding of the challenges you warmer climate people have to deal with.

  19. #474
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Thanks for that....enjoying your thread immensely.
    I once thought I was wrong, but I was wrong, I wasn't wrong.

  20. #475
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Last week we made the last door frame, and I installed the frames and doors. Everything looked a lot more finished like this.





    Irene and my mother doing some measuring and trials for the bunk in the bow cabin.



    Getting there.



    This is going to be a quite comfy twin bed.

    I mounted the remaining latches on the hatch and the skylight.



    We were planning on sailing Haabet home to Bergen at the end of out summer holiday, but mother nature had other plans (she often does).

    After weeks of record breaking heat, we suddenly had a different kind of weather record to deal with. Windspeed.

    From almost dead calm, the wind churned up six meter (18 ft) waves in no time. We decided to go home by car and hope for some calmer weather again before the usual autumn storms arrive.

  21. #476
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Very Nice Latches - Could you share where you acquired them from, please. Thank you.

  22. #477
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    These latches are bought from http://www.toplicht.de/en/

  23. #478
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    Default

    Toplicht are a great resource for traditional gear if a bit pricy. Nice work.

  24. #479
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    A great thread of a great project. Thanks for sharing.


    However, there is something that doesn’t make sense to me: the engines horsepower, fuel consumption and speed. If you don’t mind would you tell us about how you chose the component of the propulsion system?

    A fuel consumption of 3 liters per hour tells me that the engine generates something like 15 hp (10-20?), and your engine is 100 hp? A 100 hp engine will consume about 25 liters per hour fully loaded. Utilizing only 15 hp from a 100 hp engine feels a bit strange to me. I will suggest that the propeller diameter is too small. Of course if you increase the diameter you will have more drag when sailing. With 100 hp, the right reduction gear and right sized propeller the boat should easily do 7 to 8 knots, may be more. From the picture I would guess that the propeller is about 40 cm in diameter, it should be closer to 60 cm or even more. Though there should be a free space of 1-2 inches on top and bottom. The rpm of the propeller should be less than 1000 at full speed.

    I understand that the old engine was a 20 hp SABB diesel? That engine was sold with a 2 blade propeller of 59 cm diameter (optionally a 50 cm three blade propeller that was the minimum size recommended).


    I am just curious.

  25. #480
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Quote Originally Posted by Faering View Post

    However, there is something that doesn’t make sense to me: the engines horsepower, fuel consumption and speed. If you don’t mind would you tell us about how you chose the component of the propulsion system?

    ...

    A 100 hp engine will consume about 25 liters per hour fully loaded.
    Many factors go into a boats fuel consumption, including hull shape, proper trim, reduction gears, and of course the propellor.

    Now, also consider this. A 20hp motor would have to be working at full output to get that boat going. A 100hp motor, however, is using just a portion of its available output to maintain cruising speed. This equates to less strain on the motor, improving longevity. Additionally, the fuel consumption of a partial load can be a fair bit less that at full output.


    Also, I believe I remember reading that Haabet originally would have had an 80hp or so engine, and that the small one which was removed was not really adequate.

    Also also, horsepower is a number derived from a formula. I feel that max torque at X RPM is a more telling specification.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  26. #481
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Quote Originally Posted by Faering View Post
    A great thread of a great project. Thanks for sharing.


    However, there is something that doesn’t make sense to me: the engines horsepower, fuel consumption and speed. If you don’t mind would you tell us about how you chose the component of the propulsion system?

    I am just curious.
    To quote Dorothy Parker; "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity."


    First of all; I´m no engine guy, so we have trusted more capable people to chose a suitable engine, gear and propellor.

    The engine delivers 75kW at 2800rpm. We usually run it around 1500rpm which, according to the charts, gives us around 50kW. The gear has a 3:1 reduction and the propellor has a diameter of around 60cm (I don't have the exact size).

    We have honestly never tried to run the engine at max rpm, so I don't know what speed that would give us. With the engine room only partially sound proofed, 1500rpm is a nice speed/ fuel consumption/ noise compromise.

    The fuel consumption for the engine is listed at 230g/kWh at 1800rpm, so we should be using something like 10-11 liters per hour at 1500rpm. The rough fuel consumption/ hour calculation was done after the first refill of the tank and after only 30 hours of run time. A good percentage of those 30 hours are probably at idle speed and not representative. I didn't think of that when I did it.

    The 20hp Sabb was certainly inadequate. I don't know what the owner who put it in was thinking, but I'm guessing it was a question of economy. The engine before that was a 115hp Thornycroft.

    The original engine was a 12hp thing, but transferring that from a huge engine with a massive flywheel to a modern engine doesn't really work.

  27. #482
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Quote Originally Posted by Haabet View Post
    The engine delivers 75kW at 2800rpm. We usually run it around 1500rpm which, according to the charts, gives us around 50kW. The gear has a 3:1 reduction and the propellor has a diameter of around 60cm (I don't have the exact size).

    We have honestly never tried to run the engine at max rpm, so I don't know what speed that would give us. With the engine room only partially sound proofed, 1500rpm is a nice speed/ fuel consumption/ noise compromise.

    The fuel consumption for the engine is listed at 230g/kWh at 1800rpm, so we should be using something like 10-11 liters per hour at 1500rpm. The rough fuel consumption/ hour calculation was done after the first refill of the tank and after only 30 hours of run time. A good percentage of those 30 hours are probably at idle speed and not representative. I didn't think of that when I did it.

    The 20hp Sabb was certainly inadequate. I don't know what the owner who put it in was thinking, but I'm guessing it was a question of economy. The engine before that was a 115hp Thornycroft.

    The original engine was a 12hp thing, but transferring that from a huge engine with a massive flywheel to a modern engine doesn't really work.
    The information you gave now is more realistic and seems to be just fine. You mentioned 6 knot after cleaning the hull. If this also was at 1500 rpm you will probably reach 7-8 knots on full rpm. With engine rpm of 2800 and a reduction gear of 3:1, the propeller will run at about 930 rpm which is good for this type of boat.

    My next curiosity is if you will manage to reach the engine 2800 rpm when the propeller is running and the boat has gained its speed. If you test it, please let us know.


    (The 20 hp SABB was recommended for fishing boats up to 30 feet and motor sailers up to 40 feet. I still have a brochure from 1972)

  28. #483
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    at the 5-6knot speed, what was her bow wave doing?

    did she appear to be running up to or close to hull speed?

    just curious

    ¿ me ? i love the speed & fuel consumption you are experiencing

    makes for HAPPY TIMES

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  29. #484
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    At that speed, there is not much of a bow wave at all.

    Before the rebuild, we managed a top speed of 9 knots using both engine and sails. There might have been some current in there too, but I certainly expect to get more than 6 knots out of her if we try.

  30. #485
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    I love this thread and Haabet is an inspiration. I am about to canvas the wheelhouse on my boat the way you did on Haabet (post #173 on this thread) and I would like to know what types of paint were used under and over the canvas. The old traditional methods using white lead are not available here in Canada and I think the shipwrights in Norway have probably worked this out already. Thank you in advance.

  31. #486
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Thank you.

    The roof was first coated in epoxy, just to be on the safe side. The paint used both under and over the sailcloth is Jotun Shipolin. This is a relatively elastic paint made specifically for wooden boats.

  32. #487
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    10 liters per hour seems a bit high. Is that diesel?

    I know they are rather different boats and Haabet has more displacement, but MAKOTO burns just 1.25 gallons (4.7 liters) per hour at about 9 knots...That's with a 125 hp Yanmabr />
    I am wondering if perhaps you are over propped, thus requiring a heavier throttle to make 6 knots and burring more fuel doing so. Have you tried the Boat Diesel calculator?

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  33. #488
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    10 liters per hour is just taken from the 230g/kW @1800rpm stated in the engine manual. This is surely not correct, as fuel consumption is usually not linear as far as I know.

    The actual hard fact is that we used 100 liters of diesel for the first 30 hours of runtime.

    As we use the boat more, we are going to get more accurate numbers.

    I have never hear of the Boat Diesel calculator.

  34. #489
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    There is one parameter we have not got yet and that is the propeller pitch. Do you know what it is? Based on the previous information I would guess something around 19-20 inches?

  35. #490
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    Default Re: Rebuilding "Haabet"

    Sorry, I don't know the pitch. I would have to jump in the water to get that now.

    I think I see a speed test in the not to distant future.

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