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Thread: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

  1. #1
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    Default Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Hello, I just joined this forum so am a beginner. I am a fairly serious part time woodworker. I am interested in building a guide boat using cedar strips overly imaged ribs. Looking for good plans with hopefully templates etc. for the ribs. I've found plenty of plans for boats with no ribs but I want the ribbed look. I was hoping this type of plan existed out there, and I wouldn't have to loft all the curves?


    Thanks any help would be greatly appreciated.


    Chuck

  2. #2

    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    You might find this thread useful: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-rib-drawings

    It includes a generous offer from forumite and author John Michne

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Well. Chuck, this may be a case of your artitstic desires running a foul of the technology. Modern strippers are wood/epoxy/fiberglass composites. And the glass/epoxy part is most important for rigidity and strength. It has to be tightly laminated to the wooden hull inside and out. So in the initial stages of consruction there isn't any room for ribs. The plans give you the cross stations for the mold required to form the wood strip hull. Once you have finished laninating the hull you can put whatever you want inside it. But it has to be done after the interior glass is installed. And you are not likely to find plans or patterns for such ribs because they are unnecessary for the integrity of a stripper.
    Get a copy of Ted Moores' "Canoecraft". It has what you need to know about the strip-building process.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyahoga Chuck View Post
    Well. Chuck, this may be a case of your artitstic desires running a foul of the technology. Modern strippers are wood/epoxy/fiberglass composites. And the glass/epoxy part is most important for rigidity and strength. It has to be tightly laminated to the wooden hull inside and out. So in the initial stages of consruction there isn't any room for ribs. The plans give you the cross stations for the mold required to form the wood strip hull. Once you have finished laninating the hull you can put whatever you want inside it. But it has to be done after the interior glass is installed. And you are not likely to find plans or patterns for such ribs because they are unnecessary for the integrity of a stripper.
    Get a copy of Ted Moores' "Canoecraft". It has what you need to know about the strip-building process.
    Thanks for the info. From what I have read you can do strip boat epoxied on just the outside with ribs on the inside, or epoxy on both sides with no ribs ?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Fox View Post
    Thanks for the info. From what I have read you can do strip boat epoxied on just the outside with ribs on the inside, or epoxy on both sides with no ribs ?
    Without any experience doing it with glass on both sides is difficult enough. A stripper hull takes roughly 3 times as long as a similar Stitch and Glue version. If you get off on some modification of the standard method without a rock solid idea of the implications you may be headed for a lot of hairpulling. For instance, how many ribs do you need how big do they have to be and how do you make them? Steam bending isn't rocket science but there is a modicum of knowhow required to get it done in a reasonable amount of time.
    And there is the problem of whether ribs are as structurally as sound as a laminate of glass. One strip builder here has been adament that the interior glass is more important to the strength of the hull than the exterior because glass is strongest in tension.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    I believe this book:
    http://www.amazon.com/Building-Adiro.../dp/0971306990
    http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/300-684
    suggest a glassed exterior and ribbed interior technique. I haven't tried it. I'm currently working (slowly) on a traditional planked guideboat, but am laminating the ribs from steambent sitka spruce.

    For other plans the Adirondack Museum has a large number available (but they will require lofting, no rib templates) you can call them or email them via this:
    http://www.adirondackmuseumstore.com/info.html
    or there is:
    http://adirondack-guideboat.com/guideboat.html
    Who also provides direct rib plans and a useful book
    Last edited by Hugh Conway; 11-26-2012 at 07:27 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    There's a boatbuilder here in Vermont that builds Adirondack Guideboats just the way you want. A stripper hull, glassed inside and out, with laminated ribs thrown in just for the looks.
    With a stripper hull, you have to glass inside and out both for strength and rot protection. Glassing just the outside is an invitation to disaster.

    Don't confuse this with a strip-planked hull. Usually these are larger boats built with strips edge-nailed and glued. They have ribs, but not as many as a regular carvel planked boat. Glassing these types of hulls is optional. But again, if one side is glassed, it's best to do the other also.

    So, my advice is to buy a set of plans for a stripper guideboat and just laminate or steam bend the ribs in latter.

    i'm currently building a glued lapstrake sailboat and am thinking of putting in ribs, although not needed for strength, just for the traditional looks.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    My understanding is the hull is symmetrical with 13 pairs of ribs. Done quite a bit of steam bending, no epoxy work. Don't know the size of the ribs that's why I was looking for patterns?


    thanks

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    The best information on what you're looking for (if I understand correctly) is by John D. Michne. Hugh gave a link to the book on Amazon above but you can also buy it from the author. Lots of info on the build on his site too.

    http://www.michneboat.com/Book%20Info.htm

    He also has a set of full size patterns for the ribs which he'll send you, there's more than 13...20 something. You might have to buy the book to get the patterns but it's well worth it. I don't really know for sure as I purchased my book when they first came out and he sent me the patterns this year when I asked.

    Really nice guy too. Will answer your questions should you have problems. I haven't made one of these boats but have done a couple stripper canoes. It's not that difficult and would be very much easier if the glass/epoxy is only on the outside as in Johns design. I found glassing the inside of my canoes one *&^%$#@ PITA. So much so that two small canoes was the beginning and end of my composite boat construction....although I'm pretty close to giving the Guideboat a go.
    "Take good care of the earth, for it was not given to you by your Grandfathers but loaned to you by your Grandchildren."

    Native American Saying.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jones View Post
    There's a boatbuilder here in Vermont that builds Adirondack Guideboats just the way you want. A stripper hull, glassed inside and out, with laminated ribs thrown in just for the looks.
    With a stripper hull, you have to glass inside and out both for strength and rot protection. Glassing just the outside is an invitation to disaster.

    Don't confuse this with a strip-planked hull. Usually these are larger boats built with strips edge-nailed and glued. They have ribs, but not as many as a regular carvel planked boat. Glassing these types of hulls is optional. But again, if one side is glassed, it's best to do the other also.

    So, my advice is to buy a set of plans for a stripper guideboat and just laminate or steam bend the ribs in latter.

    i'm currently building a glued lapstrake sailboat and am thinking of putting in ribs, although not needed for strength, just for the traditional looks.
    http://www.adirondack-guide-boat.com/

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Scot L T View Post
    The best information on what you're looking for (if I understand correctly) is by John D. Michne. Hugh gave a link to the book on Amazon above but you can also buy it from the author. Lots of info on the build on his site too.

    http://www.michneboat.com/Book%20Info.htm

    He also has a set of full size patterns for the ribs which he'll send you, there's more than 13...20 something. You might have to buy the book to get the patterns but it's well worth it. I don't really know for sure as I purchased my book when they first came out and he sent me the patterns this year when I asked.

    Really nice guy too. Will answer your questions should you have problems. I haven't made one of these boats but have done a couple stripper canoes. It's not that difficult and would be very much easier if the glass/epoxy is only on the outside as in Johns design. I found glassing the inside of my canoes one *&^%$#@ PITA. So much so that two small canoes was the beginning and end of my composite boat construction....although I'm pretty close to giving the Guideboat a go.
    I have that book I'm about half way through. How do you get the rib drawings?

    thanks!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    It was John Michne who was giving the CAD drawings away here. The link to the thread with the offer is above. They were full-size and ready for the printer.
    "A man builds the best of himself into a boat- builds many of the memories of his ancestors." -Steinbeck

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jones View Post
    There's a boatbuilder here in Vermont that builds Adirondack Guideboats just the way you want. A stripper hull, glassed inside and out, with laminated ribs thrown in just for the looks.
    With a stripper hull, you have to glass inside and out both for strength and rot protection. Glassing just the outside is an invitation to disaster.
    They are in fact only glassed on the outside. The ribs are structural. I saw one at the Maine Boat Builders show and had a good look at the construction, and talked to the folks manning the display. Their web site says: The exterior of our wooden boat is covered with a protective layer of nearly invisible fiberglass.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Adirondack guide Boat Plans

    You can strip plank over ribs and glass just the outside. The first guide-boat I built was simply strip planked like a strip canoe, glass inside and out, no ribs. The second one was double planked over ribs, no glass at all. The third one was strip planked over ribs spaced on 6 inch centers, each strip was screwed to each rib with #3 brass screws and the outside was glassed with 4oz glass and epoxy, the inside simply painted. The next guide-boat I build will either be stripped only (no glass) or planked traditionally. I haven't decided yet.

    I glued up all the spruce rib stock using Titebond III (and plenty of it) applied with a chip brush. As soon as I started to slice the individual ribs from the rib stock, they began to show signs of delamination!! I chopped them all up and threw them away. No more Titebond III for me!! Its back to the ol epoxy.

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