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Thread: Low horsepower planing boats?

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    A little bit more about the Jericho Bay Skiff.

    To get a better perception of her size have a look at this one for sale in the US and go to picture 15

    http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=2501102

    The design was featured in Wooden Boat Magazines 2012 "Small Boats" page 93 to 95. http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/201-007d for only $3.95 digital download.

    The opening paragraphs describe how well she performed when out in 25 knots of snotty conditions. Summarising by saying " This is a forgiving boat"

    Brian

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    It has a reassuringly high bow shape. But low HP? I dont know what size engine SD considers easy or wishes to carry around,should it not be bolted permenently to the transom, and anything like that 20hp Honda is a permenent fixture.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    $20,000 wow

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Nice example of the Jericho skiff Brian but as hwyl says 20k!!! And the 20hp outboard nice as it is it's looking like a small rib without the tubes.

    If you look hard enough i'm sure it's possible to find a local equivalent like this
    http://bursledonblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/fred.html

    I have to say the hylan boat is looking like the right kind of build and finish for the use I have in mind.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    I think design wise, freeboard, or the lack of, maybe a deciding factor. The Bowdidge boats are quite deep for the size, but the Fleet and even the Hylan boat look quite low,but obviously a lot of other factors,hull shape,flare etc that can mean that one boat with low freeboard is not as bad as another. The only advantage of fleet is car toppable, but can you do this SD? If you have to use a trailer anyway,then maybe the Hylan boat will be a better choice,and the bow sections may be a little easier to construct, if more time consuming, maybe. But have you seen those curves on Ankle Deep?

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    As always I defer to the building expertise of the other members here. However, regarding planing powerboat operation, I feel confident in commenting that a bow the shape of the Hylan boat may be problematic at planing speeds. Plunge that bow under with the seas behind and the transom is going to want to pass the bow; never a good thing.

    I do think she is pretty, and were she mine, I'd be operating her at the slowest speed required to maintain steerage in any kind of rough water.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Also, the misnomer with regards to flat bottom boats being ideal for beaching. Maybe on a lake or river where the water levels are constant, but in the land with falling and rising tides, not so much. People assume that a boat that sits more upright on a beach makes it better for the purpose, that is, until the tide goes out even just a little and now you are faced with a suction effect that adds 'tons' to an otherwise light boat. I have personally (with the aid of another!) spent upwards of an hour un-sticking a boat from the beach, even with a 3rd of the aft section of the hull still in water, and after taking all of the gear out and it had no motor on it. We made giant sand angels in the wet sand swinging the hull side-to-side trying to inch it backwards to get enough water under the hull. We learned it best to leave that flat bottom well in the water from that point on, at least during falling tides.

    The other factor is agility. High freeboard does not always translate to seaworthiness as much as the hull's ability to conform to the conditions, and more often than not, is as more up to the helmsman. Sometimes, the higher sided boats may be water friendly but a bastard with the breeze when taking on such simple tasks such as drift fishing. Nothing worse on the water than a fishing boat that twirls in the breeze like a leaf. Lower profiles with sheer decks are usually a better option when boats serve more duty than just merely sitting down and riding around.

    Depending on flare, higher freeboard, while feeling more secure visually, is of no benefit if it puts the rails well outboard of where one stands. In other words, if the floor/side juncture is mismatched, there is nothing to stop the fall, or let the legs know where 'overboard' is until one is actually headed that way. As an example, the carlins on my own hull are nearly directly plumb above that juncture so that your leg feels it in which to steady you in a more upright position while footing is still sure. Getting back into a low sided hull is certainly easier if one is not equipped with ladders or platforms, which is another often overlooked function of actual seaworthiness.

    Speed. I know the thought of motoring along most efficiently, quietly and softly has certain romantic notions about it and can make us feel smart when we tally up the numbers with cost of operation etc, but this is where seaworthiness fits in yet again. I see a lot of designs that weigh a lot of criteria with keeping water out and people in, but there is a caveat. In other words, a slower boat better be seaworthy, for that when you notice the conditions starting to appear that you may favor the least, chances are, you are still going to be out in them, whereas, with a boat that will get out of it's own way, one can get back to shore more often than not before it gets to that point. In these modern times, with weather reporting being as it is, the distance one can see on the ocean, there really is no reason to not be able to avoid these conditions unless boating is your day job. When I head out, I check the weather and am familiar with the possibilities on any given time of the year. When I hear of afternoon weather, I know I can still go out, do my thing and be back before it arrives and this can happen as well when I see the thunderheads forming off in the distance without warning. In the old days of forced economy, it was "I" that had the wet clothes and 4" of water in the bottom of the boat, while the others at the ramp were long gone, sipping coffee on the inside looking out at my fool self trying to load a logged boat and gear in the rain, but yeah, I saved 5 dollars.

    One thing about a swift hull is that you can always drive it slower and sweeter, but it sure is nice to have the speed when you need it, and it has been my experience that it is desirable more often than not. Just the fact that you can detour and completely change the approach to the seas without adding yet more time to such adventure, again, is at times worth more than it's weight in gold.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    ""Just the fact that you can detour and completely change the approach to the seas without adding yet more time to such adventure, again, is at times worth more than it's weight in gold. ""

    Thats a very good point.

    SD have you seen Atkin "happy Clam" ? Around the same size as the Hylan boat, aound 900lbs (almost 3 times as heavy), but has been clocked at almost 15mph with a 5.5hp(inboard). It has one of those Seabright type box keels that seem to turn heavy boats into very efficient hull forms. You can download free plans online, cant recall the site off hand. Dont see any reason why it could not be built in ply,and an outboard put in a well, or even on the transom. You may even like the look of it being very much a utilitarian type work boat.I note Kevins comment on the stem on the Hylan boat,and the Happy Clam has a nice rounded fore-foot. But have you seen those curves on Ankle Deep? Cheers
    Last edited by skaraborgcraft; 10-21-2012 at 04:20 PM.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    [QUOTE=skaraborgcraft You can download free plans online, cant recall the site off hand.[/QUOTE]

    Here they are:

    http://countryplans.com/vintage_farm...yClamSkiff.pdf

    It will be interesting to see what you come up with finally. There's lot's to choose from if your mention of up to Force 6 wind against strong tidal current can be set aside.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    $20,000 wow
    It says 20kts, as in knots, not dollars. I had to look twice to figure out where the $20k came from.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    This ones also available to look at at. Yacht finish.

    Both those boats are professional/ prof finish and they are selling to get a profit, and good for them.

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2012.../United-States

    The original design was for an inshore Lobsterboat workboat designed by Joel White. An old one was measured and 'rebirthed' by Tom Hill. Its a 16ft strip planked boat, glassed in and out. You can easily get 20ft long planks so constuction would be easy and pretty cheap. For home builders excluding the engine it would be only a few ŁK max for that boat. The trailer and motor adds cost like it always does.

    My decision would be based on whether I wanted a low HP planing boat for river/ local inshore use on light flat days when there's been high pressure for a few days in protected water (in which case a low HP small planing light boat will be fine) or was planing on going out in the Solent to cross to the Island for a day or two, in which case something a bit bigger and heavier and more powerful might be found to be a better fit.

    In my experience with a Ring 21, optimum to get around the Solent is a boat that will do about 25 knots, more than that isn't needed. That speed is quick enough to get somewhere and still not too fast so you can see Lobsterpot buoys which are out of the main channels at Beaulieau and Lymington etc.

    I'd actually go for something 20ft and pushed with a reasonable engine, maybe 20-50 etc and go for a rollercoaster trailer to make launching easy as possible.

    The BandB Marissa is pretty good for a Solent boat that will get used and not be found wanting.



    http://www.bandbyachtdesigns.com/ec018.htm

    it might be possible to arrange a locally cut CNC kit. Kit illustrated here



    Powerboat deisgns are often governed by what engine you can get or have for what price, as that where alot of the money goes. You kind a have to pick the engine your prepared to pay for and work back to chose the optimum hull.

    With the pressure waves you get of Freshwater and most river entrances and wind against tide chop etc I think a bigger heavier more powerful boat suits the solent better to get more year round use and comfort for inexperienced crew.

    Ideal days are more available if someone is retired than working weekend warriors, so that might be a bearing on useability too.

    Cost wise fitting out a grp 17ft Wilson Flyer grp moulding from Portsmouth is very cost efficient.

    Another good Solent boat which is built from a ply kit is the Workstar 17 designed in Lymington by Humphries yacht Design and produced in Dorchester. There has been one for sale on eBay as well. Again, very much in the RIB style without the collar.



    Another good Solent boat would be the Ocean Pointer. Its all getting bigger I know, but I think it would be more useable. The Ocean Pointer was a workboat, though most are now more yacht finished. Its a looker.


    http://www.by-the-sea.com/stimsonmarine/smplans.html
    Strip plank and there's a book on how to build one.

    For the Solent and Hurst narrows at their roughest, a Bartender 19 would be a lot of fun



    http://www.bartenderboats.com/index.html
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 10-22-2012 at 07:42 AM.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Nice to have choices eh!

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Pace and a smooth ride from very little power...



    Speak to those terribly nice people at Bloodaxe.
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    This is the optimum open boat shape for the conditions for comparison. The cost is hp and fuel.



    Those Bowdidge Pro Tournament have all the features the Rings and Phantoms developed. Very similar. Everything is a compromise away from that ideal for lower running costs, windage, weight etc. Not that it isn't good to have lower running costs, but that's a separate issue from the boats fittness for purpose. A light, clever low 10-15hp hp planing boat would have to be used intelligently with some guile and would have a 'window' when its ideal in the Solent. Mostly the wind from the South west runs up the Western Solent which also runs up from the south west, so its flatest down our end from an hour before low tide when the flood starts. That means launching at low tide from the western end where there will be no fetch, so a small light boat on a low trailer might work best for exploring the western end: you then have a window typically till the ebb starts an hour before high, to get out and about when the wind and tide are in the same direction. Opposite in the Easterlies etc where you want to launch from the more Eastern end and catch conditions on the ebb etc. This approach I took with my Ring and it always paid. Also if you launch at low tide at the Western end in a gentle SW, you have the ramp and Solent to yourself, as well as low running cost boat, you won't be able to keep the smug smile off your face having beaten the system...another good advantage of the flat bottom easy planing type perhaps: so it will float in low water. That means the end of the ramp and mud, mud, mud. So workboat grey finish inside. That Tom Hill Long Point has a really thick rockered but 'flat' bottom to hose it out easy without needing rib support, specifically not to hold crud and obstruct water flow (fish guts as the designer was a keen angler). Something of merit if your climbing in with muddy wellies later. Your pulling out at high, so the ramp is less steep and your near the top which is an easier pull onto the trailer, up the ramp and there's more grip. So western end, think low tide launching in SW'lies, I know its perverse, but it works (that and look for neaps not springs when the water flow is much higher).

    Ed
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 10-22-2012 at 08:24 AM.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Shame the workstar 17 is only avaliable as a kit. Similar but smaller baot would be Fishers 13ft harrier.



    It looks far too much like my old mirror dinghy, but it car toppable (66kg), and will do 20 knots on 15hp.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?



    15 ft Fisher Rascal dory skiff. 15knots on 9hp.


    Workboat heritage,simple build,but it does have a flat bottom. If you notice, Ankle Deep has really nice curves.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    I think Ed makes a good point about a small boat being used intelligently, and one that can take some error in judgement or sudden changes in the weather.....i know which one i would rather build, and not be overly paranoid everytime i went out with my family aboard.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    A number of designers have garvey boat plans including WoodenBoat. http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/400-126 Of course there is also Little Moby, http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/400-077

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Especially older designs from the two stroke era, its worth considering the absolute weight of the engine the boat was designed for when looking at small light boats additional to the horsepower: new four stroke engines weigh more than two strokes that an older boat may have been designed to use. Even the 21ft 80/90's powerboats go nose up when with a new four stroke on the transom.

    You can buy light clean fuel efficient two strokes now but the market is generally going to four strokes, Especially with a more typically small light boats of this type, actual engine weight is important for trim (beyond going down the trim and tilt approach or overall weight issues).

    Ed
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 10-22-2012 at 11:16 AM.

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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Another one from Bolger the Surfmaster, 19'x5'4" for motors 10-35hp

    http://www.instantboats.com/downeast...ory=surfmaster

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    I believe,but correct me if im wrong, that unless you are a commercial UK user, you cannot buy a 2-stroke outboard anymore. Theres a Yamaha dealer on Scilly that has a range of 2-strokes, the only others i know being the Evinrude range, but again,being sold only to commercial users. I agree the weight difference between a 20hp 2-stroke Vs 4-stroke is another pair of hands, especially if you have a back like mine. I wouldnt say the fuel difference between them around 10 hp, is worth the extra expense of the four-stroke for a leisure user. Plenty of good second hand outboards availiable, and some real dogs too.......shop wisely.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Just a reminder of where we started - with Ross Lillistone's Fleet.





    6hp four stroke - two men aboard,





    Quote "The whole idea with this boat has been to produce a soft-riding, slim boat which will give spirited performance with minimum power. The building process is simple, and the owner completed her in four weeks from start to finish working before and after his seven-day-per-week real job! He did have help with the painting, but the rest was done alone.

    Ross Lillistone"

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    wow 10 hours slaving over a hot computer screen and telephone and then I come home to this, apologies but I'm having trouble taking it all in and making rational sense of it all, but thanks everyone for your input and ideas.

    Pipefitter makes some interesting points and clearly based on the real experience I was seeking when I started this post - thank you, if there's one thing I do want to avoid it's getting stuck/sucked onto ryde sands!!

    But have you seen those curves on Ankle Deep?

    I had a quick look on Gumtree there's a ring 21 with a 200hP outboard and trailer for under four grand - http://www.gumtree.com/p/for-sale/sp...ler/1001321207 - but frankly I'm not sure I could carry off the red vinyl seats .

    It's those curves on Ankle Deep

    I like the happy clam - sounds like a restaurant (and going off at a tangent I'd recommend Dave Barry's Tricky Business - Happy clam/ Conrad conch - well worth a read to find out what I'm talking about) - but if I was going for something that scale it would be rescue minor not least because i find the design so intriguing.

    But have you seen those curves on Ankle Deep?

    I think we all recognise bigger is probably better and the B& B Marissa would make a fine Solent boat, perhaps a bit short on curves... did i mention ankle.... but back to where i came in and thanks for the reminder Brian - small and simple is good and while I'm not sure at the moment that Flint or similar is up to the job, I'm still intrigued, from the photo's the background looks like open sea and the accounts I;ve read on Ross's blog suggest it just might be.

    I did some reading at the weekend in particular Bolger's Slicer, ok at 30 feet it's not small but it is light, allegedly with the ability to slice through rather than over choppy waves and claims interesting performance from small power plant - from "Boats with open mind " - apparently one was sold not long ago - there's a thread on the forum somewhere.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    Just a reminder of where we started - with Ross Lillistone's Fleet
    I like it for the very light weight, rowing, very low horsepower outboard engine, planing boat requirements. And if I was forced to use it in occasional very difficult conditions as first mentioned, I'd add a self draining outboard well and very light deck aft, and some small, strong, lightweight fixtures here and there to securely tie stuff down. Then I'd get a combination flotation / storage bag for each occupant. The bag would contain a one piece spray suit, wet suit, or dry suit, your choice, and a nice insulated bonnet or cap and gloves. First sign of trouble put on the gear, inflate the bags and tie them securely down to the fixtures. Tie the gas tank down and the oars too. Make sure there is more than one bailing scoop also tied securely to a lanyard. Then slow way down, hang on, and spit salt water.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    We don't get much talk of power boats in this forum and my reply was based on the OP mention of a dory, which is essentially what the Simmons is. Curves are great and all that but it's the sheer that is seen more often than not. Others mostly only seen while on the trailer. Much of which can be canceled by merely adding some tumble home to the stern, and suddenly, that's the focal point.

    Whenever I see a boat designed with an knifed forefoot, and then see it riding with it out of the water under way, is where I start scratching my head. It's nice and all that but there is very few instances to where that section is going to do any slicing on a planing hull. The best example of such an arrangement I ever saw, served one very notable function. And that was to reduce hull slap while the boat was sitting still in stealth mode, allowing the owner to get ridiculously close to his quarry. That was it. In choppy water, I have yet to be in a light boat that it notably softened the ride into anything one would call pleasant. Perhaps if you could jump from one type to the other on the same day for an almost side-by-side comparison. . ..ehh, ok. . .except perhaps with the case of opposite extremes in bottom shapes, say, a completely flat and wide bottom to one with a generous amount of deadrise.

    What fixed the ride on my Simmons was locating the pound zone, and moving the seating aft of that. At least the captain's chair. All else was made up with not-so-dense suspension foam seating. Underway, I am just aft of the pivotal point which means regardless of what the boat is doing, I am pretty much stable, or moving half as much as the boat is anyway. If it gets real rough, I'm sharing a seat in the sweet spot, like it or not.

    I know you already said the Simmons doesn't fit the bill and that is understandable, but I still would like to show a good rendition of the design for possibility of more extreme conditions and more of a family friendly boat. It looks like a good idea at any rate and they did a nice job. The owner of the nice boat in the photos on the bottom of the page is also a forum member.

    http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_billbassboat.html

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by pipefitter View Post
    I know you already said the Simmons doesn't fit the bill and that is understandable, but I still would like to show a good rendition of the design for possibility of more extreme conditions and more of a family friendly boat. It looks like a good idea at any rate and they did a nice job. The owner of the nice boat in the photos on the bottom of the page is also a forum member.

    http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_billbassboat.html
    That Billingsgate Bassboat is OK. The 18 foot Tolman skiff would be OK too, with somewhat similar dimensions. In my 18 foot Tolman I built in 900 pounds of flotation in three separate chambers and it would have been a simple matter to replace the canvas cover over the cuddy opening with a watertight 1/4 inch ply panel. The 40 horse 2 stroke gave me 30 MPH at WOT. I once stood in that outboard well with a friend and together we pulled in a swimmer who had separated from his capsized canoe - three adult males at that point and no water came aboard because of the forward height of the well.

    http://www.fishyfish.com/davewright/index.html

    You could probably drive through some really tough stuff in it, BUT WHO WOULD WANT TOO?? I wouldn't.

    The force 6 winds mentioned in post #1 give you white caps on every wave, and force 6 winds against a strong tidal current give you waves as depicted by Katsushika Hokusai. It's always good to examine requirements and decide which ones can be reasonably met, then restate them.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    The force 6 winds mentioned in post #1 give you white caps on every wave, and force 6 winds against a strong tidal current give you waves as depicted by Katsushika Hokusai. It's always good to examine requirements and decide which ones can be reasonably met, then restate them.
    For those wishing a modern interpretation rather than the classic Japanese illustration, here is a picture of current ~5 knots through the Golden Gate last week, against wind 5-6 BFT:


    Granted it's a bazilllion-mm focal length telephoto picture, the seas are clearly very large by small boat standards.

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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Small boat vs big water.


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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailing Dreams View Post
    I'm having trouble taking it all in
    What is the definition of low horsepower here? 5 hp or 20 hp?

    5 hp: Flint

    20 hp: Devlin's Candlefish 16


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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Theres been some cracking suggestions. I think SD should build one of each and then invite us all down to the Solent for a weekend of research and testing, did i mention the free beer?

    Seriously, i think the choice is down to either car toppable,which will limit the choice, or trailer and maybe a bigger size engine, which is not in the original request. If i recall correctly slicer was 29ft, 15knots and 15hp, but i do remember reading somewhere the original owner/builder thought 3 to 4ft seas was all she was able to deal with, but is that good enough for you SD?

    There is a mass of cheapish "sports" style boats with large outboards,on trailers, for not much money. Only those with a deep V are any good for what you want, and the vast majority do not handle very well at speeds below planing. They are good fun for an hour or so if someone else is paying the fuel bill, but as you stated, not everyone likes or is suited to the red plastic upholstery. Ed may chime in regarding his Ring, and i will assume he will agree that its not the best boat for slow speeds and low wash, but fine for fast dashes from A to B. Having experienced a Phantom 21 with 300hp, offshore,i can attest that the boats themselves are very able, if you can keep yourself IN it. This particular beast was fitted with 4 point harnesses and drysuits were needed.Not my thing at all. Ever seen one with back up rowlocks and oars?

    I will say no more about the curvacious Ankle Deep, at 1600 lbs, despite being EXTREMELY efficient and built for the Solent, she is way above the original criteria, but have you seen.....

    So SD, if you can decide between car top or trailer and a max outboard size, then we may be able to whittle down the options. A lightly built Bartender 19 would do anything you need,but really needs 25hp as a minimum from what i have read.

    Dave Wright hits the nail on the head if it comes to using a design like Fleet in snotty conditions. They sell great one piece bouyancy/dry suits here in Sweden for boating and ice fishing,and i would make having one each of these for people on board as essential as a bucket on any boat.

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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    a wee glimpse of ankle deep, any better images available???

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    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Theres very few images of Ankle Deep online,and only a few in Uffas book. I have the plans,but they are just bigger than the image you posted. Apart from the Flying Fifteen and Jolly Boat, i think a lot of Uffas work has slipped into the past. Uffas experience clearly shows everything he learned went into Ankle Deep. Its not a design that will need trim tabs and oversize chine flats or spray rails to work, all the performance ehancing details are built into the hull shape, not added afterwards. Its a masterpiece of design work and suited to its exact purpose of cruising around the Solent in pretty much any weather, at good speed and using low horsepower. I dont think SD has seen those curves yet. If its too big, just reduce the size by 10%. Perfick! You may notice i quite like this design,for this intended purpose, SDs not mine.

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    369

    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    I've never seen the Solent but I'm familiar with Puget Sound, another body of water that can either be a lake or something not to be out on in anything less than a 128 car ferry. My 2 cents is that for a commuter or a boat that will get the most use is something around 17 feet.

    Timing is everything. I've fished the sound in a 10' rib, 14' skiffs and more. One of the more famous local boats was a Poulsbo boat, a small inboard skiff. In their place these boats sufficed. On the other hand none of these boats were comfortable for kids, like most skiffs trim and balance weighs in and keeping kids still for 30 or 40 minutes is difficult. After a wet bouncy ride the kids may lose interest in boating altogether.

    I found the boat I used most was a 17' uniflite, 50 hp outboard, with a small cabin. I could take it out in conditions that the skiffs weren't suited for, the kids and wife had shelter from the wind when they wanted, there was no way for anyone to go overboard with it's high freeboard, and very importantly I could launch and retrieve it myself.

    I second the suggestions here of the Simmons, Tolman, and Bartenders. Any of these in the small sizes 17-19 feet would be an excellent choice. Another couple of boats I'd suggest would be Jimbo by Glen-L, the planing Kayleah by Tracy O'Brien, and the boats of Nexus Marine.
    John
    ----
    To err is human. To arr is pirate.

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,992

    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    SKB,

    On Ankle Deep, does it give the engine Uffa used or recommended for it? Any sections shown? Is there offsets, stem profile and scantlings for the build method?

    Ed

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    19,655

    Default Re: Low horsepower planing boats?

    Twin 9.9 outboards, there is something perverse about that.

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