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Thread: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

  1. #1
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    Default "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I got an email this evening from somebody who found me through the forum here. His handle was just a bit cryptic, but it managed to kick start a couple of dormant neurons and jump start a memory or 2 from long ago. It turns out the the email came from the kid who was skippering Ranger when I signed on.

    Another sailing legend has crossed the bar.

    http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...lls-84560.html

    They broke the mold, and then they made Eddie.

    Eddie used to own a 65' schooner named Diosa del Mar. He saved her from an early death. He tried to sell her...several times...she kept coming back.

    He gave up trying to sell Diosa and bought Lady Ada. Lady Ada, built in the '20s, was a lot newer than Diosa del Mar, and also had one foot in the grave.

    Most of you here on the forum know that you've got to be nuts to restore a 65' schooner. Restoring a second 65 foot schooner raises the crazy bar by a bunch. If you're really completely off your rocker, what do you do next? How 'bout trading in the 2 little schooners for 1 big one?

    Enter Ranger, 78' on deck, rescued from a mud flat; only he didn't trade in the 2 65 footers. He needed them to keep Ranger company on the 300' dock that he built in Alamitos Bay.

    Eddie had a tremendous effect on my life. He gave me the queen of his fleet. He gave me his credit card to fuel her up. He said "Take these people over to Catalina, and don't come back till Sunday night." He gave me enough food to feed 30 people for a couple of days. It was, at the same time, the best job of my life, and the worst, and it was the beginning of nearly a decade of schooner sailing.

    Anybody care to join me, and hoist one to Fast Eddie?

    First round's on me!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Fair winds.

    Cheers!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    "Captain Eddie Weinberg" was bigger than life. He was almost an exaggerated cartoon version of himself. He was comfortable speaking his mind without considering the consequences of his words.

    He was an "Old Gray Jewish Bastard".

    I was a "Young Gray Jewish Bastard" (at least I was young relative to Eddie).

    To all of his "Lost Boys", Eddie was "Pop".

    I became known as "Junior". Every time anybody who had ever known Eddie saw me driving Ranger around, they immediately greeted me with a big "Hi Eddie". Eddie made a strong impression on people. EVERYBODY remembered Eddie. I finally gave up trying to convince people that I wasn't him.


    The first round was cheap. I'll buy another.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    These people who seem to come from or inspire Melville, Hemingway, Sam Clements, Steinbeck, Slocombe. (cut me some slack for anachronisms) are why I am here and I am sure most of you blokes (m and f) too... Sorry to her of the passing of a good old salt but the testimonies make him live forever.. the rum's on me tonight.

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Eddie didn't get out on his boats much. Neither Ranger or Lady Ada was licensed so we chartered under bareboat rules. Eddie couldn't even legally be aboard during a charter. He had his pet charterers though. One of them was the Seal Beach Fire Department. Year after year they chartered Ranger for the annual Fireman's Race to Catalina -- and year after year Eddie signed on as cook.

    I actually enjoyed having the boss aboard. Not only was Eddie a gourmet cook, but when he wasn't in the galley he was schmoozing the pepes, and he came aboard with a menu that differed from the single dish that we repeatedly choked down for the rest of the season. And most importantly --- he just left me alone to do my job!

    There's a pic of "Captain Eddie" at the helm of Ranger posted on the link I included in my first post above. This pic was taken motoring home from the '84 Fireman's Race. I know that because I'm on the other side of that camera.

    (don't ever put anything on the net, unless you'd be happy if somebody rips it off - I am)

    In the four seasons I ran Ranger, this was the only time "Captain Eddie" ever spent on the helm.

    A few minutes before this pic was taken, I was at Ranger's helm. I was hungry. I was being assaulted by the smells of Eddie's gourmet lunch drifting up the companionway. Eddie's grizzley mug appeared in the companionway, followed by one of my crew smacking his lips. The crew doesn't eat till the pepes are fed. It's time for me to eat.

    By the time I'd given up trying to find my mate on deck, Eddie had made his way back to the cockpit. I pointed to the helm and asked him to take the con.

    I ran below, grabbed my camera, went back on deck to immortalize the moment, then returned below to dish up a hearty portion.


    Anybody still here?

    I'll buy another round for Eddie.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    "Junior" I only sailed with/by Eddie on the Diosa del Mar once , at a One More Time Race , in Marina Del Rey , soon after buying Olinka . We had Ernie Minney with his video camera on board filming . I'll check the video and see if he got any good shots of Eddie , I know Ernie got some good shots of Diosa del Mar Bob

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Firemen like to eat well, and Eddie always did them right. I had just enough time to sample a mouthful when one of my crew came running, urgently, into the salon.

    "Eddie says the Coast Guard's commin' and you've gotta come up and steer right now."

    1984 was the summer of the Olympic Games in LA. There was lots of illegal chartering going on and the Coasties were leaning hard. The appearance of a big white boat with red racing stripes was almost a guarantee that we'd be boarded. We were running just on the wrong side of legal, but close enough that we could "fib" our way legal --- as long as Eddie wasn't aboard.

    Firemen tend to be the hunkiest of the hunks. They attract females from a gene pool vastly superior to the one we mortals have to choose from. My decks were LITTERED with eye candy. I was certain that I'd soon be entertaining a boarding party.

    Eddie scurried below as soon as I got on deck. The big white boat was making a bee line for us. She was still a long way off...but she was coming fast.

    She pulled alongside me, maybe 50 yards off my beam and matched my speed.

    I watched for telltale signs of a zodiac launch.

    NOTHING!

    I felt the heat of her bridge crew focusing on the smorgasbord spread out before me.

    STILL NOTHING!

    Then just like that, a couple quick toots of the horn, some friendly waves from her deck crew, and she was gone.


    I'm feelin' kinda dry. Who's buyin' the next round?
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by ramillett View Post
    "Junior" I only sailed with/by Eddie on the Diosa del Mar once , at a One More Time Race , in Marina Del Rey , soon after buying Olinka . We had Ernie Minney with his video camera on board filming . I'll check the video and see if he got any good shots of Eddie , I know Ernie got some good shots of Diosa del Mar Bob
    I'd love to see any video you've got of Eddie or Diosa. She wasn't my boat, but after I got my license, I did do some fill in work on her.

    I don't know how many times Eddie got rid of Diosa. He always got her back. The last time, she went to Davy Jones.

    I'd be willing to bet that Eddie's sailing her again.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by Tall Boy View Post
    Was that the race yoiu had trouble at the mark? I was there as Eddie's mate

    We (I) were new to the boat (Olinka) , so the start seamed a little hairy when the other yawl trying to push me up into the RC boat doing over 10 knots . We pasted Diosa del Mar at the first mark , If I remember wright she lost a lot of speed threw that turn . That was a fast race

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I breathed a pretty serious sigh of relief when the boys with the big guns sped off, leaving us unmolested; but I wasn't as relieved as Eddie was gonna be. He could have been steppin' in some serious poo-poo if he was caught on his boat during a charter.


    I passed the con to my mate, walked forward and down the companionway. I expected to find Eddie in the main salon, hiding in a pile of firemen. My feet hit the cabin sole, I made a slight jog left then turned right to go forward; past the captain's cabin on starboard, the master stateroom to port and into the salon. There were firemen everywhere...but no Eddie!


    I made an inquiry into the whereabouts of Mr. Weinberg and was met with a wall of blank stares. The captain (theirs, not ours) screwed his brow into a puzzled frown and replied "Who?" I wasn't a Coastie, but they weren't about to let their rehearsed lines go to waste.


    I turned and retraced my steps. This time, I looked in on the captain's cabin and the master stateroom. I checked the aft cabin, the head, I looked in the large hanging locker.


    He had to be up forward.


    I re-retraced my steps. This time I paused at the rope locker to confirm my suspicions that he couldn't fit in there.




    Barkeep...my glass is empty!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by Tall Boy View Post
    They had visions of big bucks in the charter biz, problem was....they weren't Eddie
    They were a nice couple, they had visions of chartering her in Hawaii but,they weren't Eddie
    not sure if he sold her or leased her out but whatever...they weren't Eddie
    Eddie had some kind of magic going there in Long Beach. I think things just came together for him there.

    Eddie had clients who had been booking an annual trip with him for decades. And for decades, each time they returned from their annual sojourn, they immediately went up to the office and booked a trip for the next season, on the same weekend, which Eddie had been holding for them. This was more than 80% of Ranger's charters.

    When I started sailing Ranger, they were greeted by a slightly younger Eddie who had undergone a total personality transplant and had a completely different approach to trying to show them a good time. Eddie 2.0 if you will.

    I spent the first season sailing with dear old friends ----- who I had never met before.


    Somebody gonna step up and buy a round for Eddie?
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I paused briefly, and took another quick look around as I again entered the salon. I checked in the engine room as I walked forward to the galley. In the galley, I found a fireman, dutifully standing watch at the stove stirring Eddie's pot. He asked me if he could serve up a fresh plate for me. I nodded, and continued forward on my quest.

    My 30 year old memories of that part of the boat are just a bit sketchy. I didn't spend that much time up there.

    I remember bending over to get into the foc'sle. I remember standing, hunched over in the foc'sle and looking forward at the sail locker. An image of Eddie hiding in the bag with the golly entered my brain, and then left as quickly as it appeared.

    My eye was drawn, like a magnet, to the chain locker. I said to myself, "Self..........NO %&*@ing WAY!!!

    Ranger was a fairly large boat, and she had a fairly large chain locker; certainly large enough for a man to climb into. But right now that chain locker was filled with about 400' of chain, and there was just enough room in the chain locker for 410' of chain...provided that it was neatly faked.

    I remember climbing over Ranger's sail inventory to get to the aft bulkhead of the chain locker. There was a small opening cut into the bulkhead; just big enough to reach through.

    I pulled back the curtain that covered that opening. I couldn't see much more than a bit of calf on one side of the opening, and a chunk of thigh on the other - but there he was!

    I started chuckling. "Hey Pop...watchya up ta?...Can I getchya a beer?"

    A clenched fist with a single extended digit appeared between the thigh and the calf. By this time I was laughing quite hard. I couldn't see it, but I could imagine the steam that was now escaping from Eddie's ears.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I enjoyed the past two years with Capt. Eddie. His boat was docked directly next to us at Newmarks. He had so many stories to share with us and was a wonderful man. One weekend when we came to the boat - there was a huge container of Kirklands coffee next to the vessels door - it was from Capt. Eddie. He told me that his mother taught that when a person purchases a home - to always give the gift of coffee. He was truly an inspirational man and both my husband and I feel blessed to have known him for the past two years and only wish that we could have known him longer. The last time I saw Capt. Eddie, was about 3 in the morning. I heard is horn blasting in short spurts. This was about two weeks previous to his passing. I remember passing "My Last Penny" and only seeing him barely next to the door jam, I told him I was off to find help. I went running from boat to boat to find help for him - help was found and he was fine. The U.S.S. Iowa came into San Pedro and one of our friends, JW took him for a boat ride previous to his death - Capt. Eddie was so proud to see the ship that he had tears in his eyes. Capt. Eddie would often talk with us about our two sons, both infantry - one a Ranger and would always let us know how proud he was of our sons. He was truly a wonderful man and he will truly be missed.
    Last edited by MarilynMuttroe; 07-11-2012 at 12:15 AM.

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by MarilynMuttroe View Post
    I enjoyed the past two years with Capt. Eddie. His boat was docked directly next to us at Newmarks. He had so many stories to share with us and was a wonderful man. One weekend when we came to the boat - there was a huge container of Kirklands coffee next to the vessels door - it was from Capt. Eddie. He told me that his mother taught that when a person purchases a home - to always give the gift of coffee. He was truly an inspirational man and both my husband and I feel blessed to have known him for the past two years and only wish that we could have known him longer. The last time I saw Capt. Eddie, was about 3 in the morning. I heard is horn blasting in short spurts. This was about two weeks previous to his passing. I remember passing "My Last Penny" and only seeing him barely next to the door jam, I told him I was off to find help. I went running from boat to boat to find help for him - help was found and he was fine. The U.S.S. Iowa came into San Pedro and one of our friends, JW took him for a boat ride previous to his death - Capt. Eddie was so proud to see the ship that he had tears in his eyes. Capt. Eddie would often talk with us about our two sons, both infantry - one a Ranger and would always let us know how proud he was of our sons. He was truly a wonderful man and he will truly be missed.
    Apparently, "Captain Eddie" aged well. 30 years ago, comments like inspirational, and wonderful man would have been drowned out by rogue and scamp. He was abrasive --- just to the point of it being an endearing quality. I can't even imagine Eddie getting emotional enough to tear up.

    Like me, Eddie just didn't fit into any of the little molds that society has created for us. He lived life his own way on his own terms. He wrote his own rules - where he could get away with it.

    At one time I thought it was a persona that he wore around the boats, but... I had an old friend who knew Eddie from his days racing blown hydros. I've met people who spoke of Eddie during his days as a green grocer. I've heard stories of Eddie during his bar owner days. Eddie was always wearing that persona.

    I can really kick myself for not trying harder to get in touch with him during the last few years!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  15. #15

    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by SchoonerRat View Post
    Apparently, "Captain Eddie" aged well. 30 years ago, comments like inspirational, and wonderful man would have been drowned out by rogue and scamp. He was abrasive --- just to the point of it being an endearing quality. I can't even imagine Eddie getting emotional enough to tear up.

    Like me, Eddie just didn't fit into any of the little molds that society has created for us. He lived life his own way on his own terms. He wrote his own rules - where he could get away with it.

    At one time I thought it was a persona that he wore around the boats, but... I had an old friend who knew Eddie from his days racing blown hydros. I've met people who spoke of Eddie during his days as a green grocer. I've heard stories of Eddie during his bar owner days. Eddie was always wearing that persona.

    I can really kick myself for not trying harder to get in touch with him during the last few years!


    When we purchased our vessel two years ago, he would come aboard and tell us stories - he was always very kind. Towards the last few months and more so, in the last few weeks previous to his death, he showed his emotional side. He really enjoyed seeing the U.S.S. Iowa in San Pedro. All that you say, is what just about every one who knew him in the older days - he was a man that one would not want to cross. He changed a lot of peoples lives. He will be missed. It is hard to now on our weekends when we go to Newmarks, to walk by "My Last Penny" and not see Capt. Eddie there.

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I stood there, laughing, not sure what to do next.

    I thought of grabbing the mop handle, that was temptingly just out of reach, and applying a couple of strategically placed prods to the now completely helpless "Captain".

    I thought of just hangin' out there, long enough to witness the spectacle of Eddie trying to extricate himself.

    I even considered offering to help him.

    Before I was able to do something I new I'd regret later (he was able to get out by himself without my help anyway), a fireman appeared in the foc'sle with a fresh steaming plate of lunch.


    "Bartender, I'll take a pickled egg with this round."
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I can't tell you how long it had been since I first sat down and tried to eat, but by now I was starved. I quickly devoured Eddie's creation. The captain (again theirs, not ours) asked if he could get me seconds. I handed him my plate, and true to fireman tradition, it was passed hand to hand up to the galley, where a ladle bearing hand appeared from around the corner, and filled it with another delicious portion.

    This time, when my plate reappeared before me, I savored the meal. Even eating slowly, I was almost done with my second helping before Eddie had managed to extricate himself from the undignified position he had gotten himself into. Eddie walked out of the galley with the look of a 60 year old man who had just spent an extended period of time in a very uncomfortable position. He sat down at the dinette and joined the conversation as if nothing had happened.


    Whadaya mean you're outta rum...fix that...immediately!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Eddie quickly slid into his role as "center of attention". He got to the middle of one of his ever entertaining tales, that seemed to just spew forth from him, when he said something that invited a comment comparing the 20 year old escapade he was relating with his recent predicament. I can't remember what I said, but I do remember that...

    It wasn't particularly clever...

    It included the WORST of puns...

    I got nothing but groans from most of my audience...

    but most germane to the telling of this tale...

    I got Eddie...

    I got him good!

    He screwed his face into a scowl, but he was barely able to hide the grin that was breaking through from behind. It took him a few moments, but he was able regain his composure. He managed to glare at me with the look of an Eddie who had been crossed - an Eddie you didn't want to run into for real.

    "Don't you have a damn boat to run or something?"


    This round, could you pour my rum into a cup of coffee?
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  19. #19
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    I sailed with Eddie many times on the Diosa with the Wailers Ski Club to Avalon in the 60's and 70's. (He even listed the three boats with me as a business opp-nothing happened) I used to sleep on the cabin next to the companionway and vividly remember waking up one morning to the smell of bouabase (fish stew), great way to wake up. Eddie was a fantastic cook. which leads to another story. On one os the return trips we were sailing to the west end and I was at the helm. Most of the sail was up and we were probably doing 10+ kts (it seemed like 100). Starboard rail was in the water and water was flowing past the port holes. I was in heaven. (still get goose bumps when I think about). It was about lunch time and Eddie's head popped out of the companionway. He looked left at the water on his deck and looked me, shrugged his shoulders (he had lots of shoulder to shrug) and went back to what he was doing. I didn't know until years later that the only problem he had was he couldn't keep his pots on the burners. Eddie, thanks for all of the good times.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Eddie was unforgettable to anyone who had ever met him, even for just a few minutes. Eddie was "lifechanging" to anyone who actually spent any time with him.

    When Eddie happened to me, I was mid 30s, just starting to lean towards thoughts of a "suit and tie" life. My once serious case of "Peter Pan Syndrome" was showing signs of going into remission. He just blew that to hell! Now, 30 years later, I still don't own a pair of "big boy pants" - much less a tie!

    I might have spent my life sitting in an office, chained to a phone - if not for Eddie.

    Sailing Kelpie was, literally, a childhood dream for me. That never would have happened - if not for Eddie.

    An aging body is now wrestling with my "Peter Pan Syndrome", but I've managed to reach retirement without ever having grown up. Eddie came along at just the right time to keep me from blowing that.


    "Bartender, keep the coffee coming --- but don't forget the rum.
    Last edited by SchoonerRat; 07-21-2012 at 10:45 AM.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  21. #21
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Sure, it's that sorry I am for your loss. He sounds a lovely man, entirely.
    Hands too small: Can't build his Wall!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Thanks Vince,

    But it seems that I may have done Eddie a disservice in my telling of this particular "Eddie Story". I understand that he mellowed in his final years, but the Eddie that I knew was not known as a lovely man. He was known as a thorn in the butt! If you were lucky, he wasn't a thorn in your butt! Eddie seemed to enjoy performing the role of thorn as often as he could manage.

    To say it politely, he was a "shrewd negotiator"! I never knew how much money he was paying me. I managed to catch up with him, between charters, sometimes after weeks of not being paid. There was always a compulsory argument about it not being Friday. I always countered that I wouldn't be there Friday, and that I hadn't been there for the last 2 paydays, and I wanted my pay now or he could take his own boat out on charter. He'd finally relent and peel a few bills off the wad he always kept in his pocket.

    He had an uncanny knack of picking a number low enough that I thought "What the hell am I doing here, Lincoln abolished slavery" - but not so low that I didn't think "At least he's not charging me to sail his boat."


    Excuse me, all this drinking. I've gotta go bleed my fuel line.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    At first, I really hated the "Junior" moniker. Back then, I only knew Eddie by reputation. It wasn't a reputation I really wanted to share. When I got to know him, I learned that his bark was worse than his bite - don't get me wrong, his bite was plenty bad. It didn't take too long for me to see that the only comparisons anybody ever actually made between us were our grizzly grey beards, and our common association with a schooner named Ranger. I could live with that.

    I'm coming to realize that I probably had the chance to know Eddie from a kind of unique perspective. When he came sailing with me, I was the captain. When he ceded the running of the boat to me, he seemed to impart some of his juju on me. I got along with some of his sailing buds better than he did.

    Damn it Eddie! You took off without giving me a chance to say goodbye. You ran me ragged. You made me go sailing when all I wanted to do was lie in bed and die. You paid me pennies. You fed me "Javanese Chicken" till I wanted to puke. Avalon! Avalon! Avalon! I wore a rut in the road sailing back and forth 2 or 3 times a week. Your damn schnauzers were always biting my ankles. And lets not forget the kind good morning greetings from your drunken girlfriend.

    I don't think I ever thanked you.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Sad to hear it! I met him a few times in my teenage years.

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    It's been a year now. My life hasn't changed because of "Captain Eddie's" passing. Memories of my schooner days are making more frequent appearances, and I now remember them even more fondly than I did before; other than that, it's life as usual.

    I'm not much of a drinker these days. It takes a special occasion to get me imbibing (like a day ending in "y" ). I call this a rum worthy occasion!

    I'm buyin', if anybody will drink with me.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Well, SchoonerRat, having had a somewhat similar "Waterbrother/ Mentor"......Here's to "Captain Eddie" and getting blown offshore......in a schooner!!!
    The next one's on me!

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Well damn if that ole SOB didn't get immortalized as a Wiki entry.

    I first came across that particular "Fast Eddie" story on the evening news, the day it happened. CBS even had a short interview with the soaking wet "Captain".



    This is a view of Ship Rock looking seaward, Catalina Island's Isthmus is directly behind us. From sea, the rock looks like a magnificent square rigger, but to the best of my knowledge, during the 50 years I've known this landmark, it hasn't moved an inch.

    Ship Rock was one end of the finish line of the Fireman's race that claimed Diosa del Mar. The other end was the committee boat which was anchored off to port. 10 or 15 yards to our port, another pinnacle of rock rises from the depths, just high enough to never uncover. If you want to pass Ship Rock close on the west side, you need to pass CLOSE. VERY CLOSE!

    The Isthmus, true to its name, is a low spit of land connecting two larger high bits of land. It serves as a natural venturi to funnel the winds hitting the back side of the island. Most of the mainland side of Santa Catalina is calm, in the lee of a whole bunch of rock; not so much at the Isthmus.

    Eddie said he was beating/close reaching (the difference is, admittedly, a fine line on a schooner) to the finish line doing about 12 knots. He was steering to pass Ship Rock close on the west with a number of other finishers to weather of him.


    Barkeep, another round please!
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  29. #29
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    First time I've heard of Eddie and I am poorer for it. The world is poorer for his passing. Another round on me.

    A great thread Schooner Rat. Salut!

  30. #30
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Now put yourself in the place of the photographer who took the photo above. Off to port and out to sea, you see a number of sailboats hard on the wind, heading for the finish line. The closest to you is 30 some odd tons of schooner - coming straight at you with a bone in her teeth. 20 to 25 kts. of wind is hitting your back from a point or two to your left. Crossing your field of vision, from the right to the left on the island side of the rock, is a small aluminum outboard containing 2 fishermen. Both boats seem intent on occupying the same piece of real estate, just to the west of the rock, at the same time. The large mass of rock provides excellent camouflage for the small boat, and according to Eddie, the 2 guys in the skiff were too well lubricated to bother even looking out for another boat.


    I need another drink before I can listen to any more of this story.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  31. #31
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    This may be the best obituary I've ever read.
    Await dreams, loves, life; | There is always tomorrow. | Until there is not.

    Grieving love unsaid. | Tomorrow will fail someday. | Tell them today, OK?

  32. #32
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    The way Eddie told the story was that he looked up, saw the skiff, and just instinctively reacted to avoid severe injury to the fishermen.

    I think he was less worried about the fishermen than he was about the pile of paperwork he'd have to deal with. Eddie was a strong adherent of the Darwin Principal, and was often heard muttering words like "anybody that stupid has no excuse to live!"

    Eddie headed up, towards the hidden reef. Diosa hit it with a glancing blow. 90 year old wood vs. eons old granite. By the time she came to a stop, she had a 20 or 30 foot long gash in her hull. I guess she went down in minutes. Not a single injury required medical attention.

    I paid Eddie a visit a week or so later. He showed no sign of having just lost a dear old friend. He spoke of the sinking with the same passion he might speak of getting a flat tire. I knew better than to play poker with Fast Eddie.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  33. #33
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    This wasn't one of the "Captain Eddie" stories I was thinking about when I bumped this thread a week ago. It doesn't have a happy or humorous ending with which to celebrate the man's passing. It did, however, earn the fine Captain a Wiki entry, and it tells a chapter of Eddie's life that needs to be told.

    I was surprised that I felt as strongly as I did about Diosa del Mar's loss. I only sailed her a couple of times, but every morning that Ranger was on her dock, I'd wake up, climb the companionway, and after a short look bow on at Lady Ada I turned to get a good look at Diosa's shapely rear. I spent many an hour staring at her across the anchorage at Avalon, zeroing in on her with my funnelator. Schooner races home from Long Point. She was similar to Kelpie, and there was a strong rivalry between the boats.

    I wasn't as lost as most of Eddie's "Lost Boys". He saved many of them from a life on the streets. He saved me from a much more evil fate - a suit and tie job in a little tiny cubical. I can look back, and recognize a small handful of people that have been a major influence on who I've become. Eddie stands alone in the magnitude of his influence vs. the short time he had to wield that influence, and the fact that in my mid thirtys I should have been pretty much beyond anybody's influence affecting me.


    Watch this space for the July 2014 edition.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  34. #34
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    It’s now the 2nd anniversary of his death, and Captain Eddie is still dead. Yeah, I know, I shouldn’t be surprised…that’s the way it’s supposed to work. It’s just that Eddie was…I mean…he just…he didn’t play by the rules, he bent them…he bent them just as far as he could go…without breaking them. He must be happy, where ever he is…or he woulda been back here by now.

    Scoundrel dog that Fast Eddie was, he earned the respect of polite society through his lost boys. His crew of misfits that somehow fit where Eddie put them. The kids he saved from a life on the streets. The kids who had no place else to go.

    If only polite society really knew. Eddie didn’t so much hire crew, as he did buy them. He paid their bail, he gave them a place to live, he fed them; and every gift generated a matching entry in Eddie’s little black book. As long as you had a positive entry on your page, you were in “Weinberg’s Navy”, as Eddie would call it. The rest of us knew it as “Weinberg’s Slavery”.

    At $50 a week, it wasn’t easy to work down your debt. Eddie was the bank. Eddie was the landlord. Eddie was the company store. To the best of my knowledge, Eddie was never stiffed; and by my reckoning, Eddie sometimes released a slave who was still on the book.

    With his skippers, it was a little different. We were lost in a different way. He had a different hold on us. Some of us left good jobs to join “The Navy”. Some of us managed to keep good jobs while in “The Navy”. And at least one of us stopped looking for a good job when he joined “The Navy”.

    He had a different hold on us.

    He had three really sweet little schooners. Each of them, on their own, would have been the prettiest girl in most rooms. Together…

    I really miss the sight of those three boats on Eddie’s dock.

    This is the third time we’ve gotten together here like this. As usual, the first round is on me. I see a bottle of Remy up there on the top shelf. It’s not really his kind of drink, but he wouldn’t have turned it down.

    If anybody is still listening, I think I can remember another Eddie story that won’t get me banned.

    To Captain Eddie Weinberg
    L’chaim


    (I’m sorry, wasn’t I supposed to throw the glass in the fireplace?)

  35. #35
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    Default Re: "Captain Eddie" 8 Bells

    Quote Originally Posted by SchoonerRat View Post
    If anybody is still listening, I think I can remember another Eddie story that won’t get me banned.
    Keep 'em coming.

    Sea Dreams A.K.A. Brian

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