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Thread: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Looks like cold work!!!
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  2. #37
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Ah! I wondered what that white stuff was, you don't think it could be ......... water ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  3. #38
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    This is such a cool project, what neat boat! You're a lucky man Ole, to have so many great projects to choose from.

    Jim
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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Jim, I feel that I am a lucky guy to have stumbeled over such a jewel in our maritime history, but still I must confess that I did not want such a project, at least not now.
    I have been working over 16 years on Svaap, and it was a tough decsicion to "cheat" on her with another boat. I am in the lucky situation to have Svaap inside my workshop at our farm, as the boat can stay there for some time without the danger of suffering from it. She is new and the timber is nice and dry all through the construction.

    Working with boats on my spare time over some years have learned me that things take time. A lot more time than you initially anticipate and budget with.. With Minde, I knew that the travelling alone would be a considerable challenge and cost of money and time. I need to pack all the tools I think I would need with the planned task for my weekend stay, and as you all have experienced - you most of the time forget some detail that brings the progression to a hault. 2 hours drive each way does not invite to a return home to get that drill-bit that you forgot... You have to wait until the next session, and try to find another thing to do. I have been a bit "spoiled" by the fact that I have had all of my machinery available 10 feet distance to my project, and the transcision have been challenging..

    Well, enogh complaining...

    One of the main focuses I have had througout the planning and work on Minde, is that I would stick to the original principles of construction and methodes used by the skilled workers of Mr Olsens in 1903. This means choosing methodes that are not the most efficient with todays possiblilities and standards.
    For instance, I chose to use juniper trunnels for the main fasteners where possible to access the holes in the original frames. I did not know much about the juniper bush/tree other than that it had been the first choice for traditional boat builders for many, many years. Actually we have access to it in the forest close to our farm, and I borrowed an ATW and went exploring..

    I found a lot of it, and brought them home.







    Several trips later I had the neccessary amout of wood.

    I cut them into 30 cm lenght, and roughly shaped them into a diameter of 35 milimeter on a lathe that I purchsed used.








    And took them inside a dark room to dry out.





    I have several buckets of these jewels...

    Some months later I started manufacturing a device to bring them down to a uniform dimension without too much work.

    That will be after supper...


    Cheers,

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Wow!

    Strange, I wrote a lot more than one word, lost in deep space.
    Try again.

    Such a big job to take on as well as your other boat. You are a true addict!
    you mentioned that she was originally designed as 24' keel length. So what is her actual LOD and her beam? She appears quite broad.
    From the dimensions you give for her framing she is very heavily built. Does she carry much ballast?
    It's good to see that you are trying to be authentic in your work, she is obviously quite a significant boat in her own right.
    Is she mainly trunnel fastened or are there many metal fastenings used, like to tie the framing together?

    Working outdoors in a Norwegian winter can't be the easiest thing and you have all that travel as well. Quite the effort.

    Have fun,
    Sophie
    Last edited by Farfalla; 04-30-2012 at 07:51 AM.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hi Svaap, we are always hearing how good juniper is, it's interesting that you are using sapwood as well as heartwood in those trunnels. I guess it's good too?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  7. #42
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hi Peter,

    It is not much sapwood on the juniper bush/tree, but I would avoid using it. The roughly turned trunnels will be brought down in size to clear any sapwood.

    This is a picture showing how sound the 1903 trunnels are.





    I made a simple device to do the final shaping of the trunnels, once they had dried sufficiently.
    It is made out of Turbax, and shaped to glide on the aluminum bars making the frame of the lathe.
    The disadvantage of using this one, compared to others I've seen (on the Morgan thread), is that you need to have support on both ends and that takes a bit of set-up time. Once it is set up you make them in seconds.

    I used an ordinary handplane cutter-blade, and rounded one edge to shape the head of the trunnel.
    The final dimension is 28mm i diameter.





    Tested them agains a hole made of the drill-bit that I will use on the planking. Since a lot of the original frames are still in use, I will drill from the inside of the boat through the old holes in the frames, and through the new planks. Then I countersink the outside of the planks with "something" I have not made yet, to fit the head of the trunnel.





    Any suggestion of how to make the countersink would be highly appreciated!


    Red lead paint and putty was used on the faying surfaces when bolting the stern-knee and sternpost to the keel. I made the bolts out of steel rods with riveted heads on one side and threads on the other, and sent them for hot-dip galvanizing. I will use the same quality for all metal-fasteners.
    Red lead was also painted on the bolts prior to driving them in.












    After the structure was bolted with 16mm bolts I felt it was due for a small celebration. I like to devide my work into smaller projects and this was one of them, and it feels really good to get it done. (Not that it was a small project, but smaller... you know what I mean..?)

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    My hands are numb just watching this incredible project.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Once the stern was in place, I could start the work of fitting the frames. This really is a two-man procedure, but I had to get it done alone. Some of the futtocs are very heavy, and it was hard to get them clamped up. It took some fitting/adjustments to get them in, as the knee was a lot thicker than the old one and I could not just copy the shape of the old timbers ends. The frames that end up on the stem/knee have been nothed into it.









    More frames coming in





    I used oak trunnels to fasten the frames to the floors, together with 7" galvanized ships nails.












    Some heavy timbers there...

    Next was the fairing of the frames, to prepare for planking.

    l

    l
    l

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    If you have access to a mill or similar slot a bit of steel the size of your holes and grind up a fly cutter the shape of your counter sink . Any good hardenable steel would do, even an old chisel blade, fix in place with a couple of set screws. Turn the end to suit your drill...12mm? File 3 sides flat in the lathe so it doesn't slip in the chuck.

    I use a similar tool to give flat landings on curves for nuts and washers.

    Last edited by PeterSibley; 04-30-2012 at 05:27 PM.
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  11. #46
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by svaap View Post

    Tested them agains a hole made of the drill-bit that I will use on the planking. Since a lot of the original frames are still in use, I will drill from the inside of the boat through the old holes in the frames, and through the new planks. Then I countersink the outside of the planks with "something" I have not made yet, to fit the head of the trunnel.





    Any suggestion of how to make the countersink would be highly appreciated!
    one of these tapered spoon bits, the long tapered thingy next to the brace chuck:

    Available new here: http://www.toolnut.co.uk/products/ch...Spoon_Bit.html
    Product Description
    A hand forged carbon steel tapered spoon bit from the Clifton range.
    Used by chairmakers for reaming tapered holes in the seats and arms of chairs - in particular Windsor chairs.
    When reaming a prebored straight sided hole, the spoon bit is inserted into the hole and rotated in a clockwise direction with a carpenter's brace, until the desired taper is achieved.
    When boring into solid wood, the bit should be started in the vertical position and after a "dish" has been created and the bit has begun to "bite" into the wood, the angle of boring can be changed by tilting the brace and bit out of the vertical line; in this way a tapered hole can be bored at any angle.
    This is the tool recommended by Michael Dunbar in his book 'Windsor Chairmaking'.
    Spoon Length: 125mm (5")
    Spoon Widest Width: 30mm
    Tang: square
    Tool Range: Clifton
    Send to a friend
    Click here to send a link to your friend.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  12. #47
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    That tool would probably do the job, except it should have been a bit bigger.
    The hole is 28mm and I guess the max diameter should be around 35mm or more.

    Thanks for the link!


    Peter:
    I did not see your drawing until just now.
    I think this would be a good way to make a simple but effective tool for the countersink.

    Thanks guys!



    The work continued and it was time to start fairing the frames.
    Since it was Sunday, and before church-time, I try not to make too much noise and avoid power tools.
    (The curch is on the oposite side of the river).

    Some of the fairing was done with a small hand-plane, but I was quickly tired from working with my arms above my head.
    My daughter was there to assist with holding the fairing batten, and aiming along it searching for high-spots. She went bananas with the camera, and took 30 shots in a couple of minutes..






    When I got lower on the hull I changed to the adze, one of my favourite tools.








    Working my way down the hull







    Some adjustments to the rabbet







  13. #48
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by svaap View Post
    That tool would probably do the job, except it should have been a bit bigger.
    The hole is 28mm and I guess the max diameter should be around 35mm or more.

    Thanks for the link!
    Do you know any good smiths?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #49
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    man o man , yer 16 years on your other boat , and you fix this one in what, a week?

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    man o man , yer 16 years on your other boat , and you fix this one in what, a week?
    He's fast eh ?!!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  16. #51
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Nice project!
    I am curious about that juniper for treenail... Can you give me the latin name of your juniper, as here juniper is a weak wood weaker and lighter then cedar... Which I would certainly not want for treenail!
    http://www.peacefuljourney.ca/
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  17. #52
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    "here juniper is a weak wood weaker and lighter then cedar... Which I would certainly not want for treenail!"

    Au contraire, mon ami. Swamp juniper or tamarack, not far from you, is mighty fine stuff for that. / Jim

    http://www.macphailwoods.org/tree/larch.html

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "here juniper is a weak wood weaker and lighter then cedar... Which I would certainly not want for treenail!"

    Au contraire, mon ami. Swamp juniper or tamarack, not far from you, is mighty fine stuff for that. / Jim

    http://www.macphailwoods.org/tree/larch.html
    Not larch, but Juniper(Juniperus virginiana):
    http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-...tic-red-cedar/

    I guess it answer my question... The Juniper in question which is not in the Juniperus family is in fact larch...
    Last edited by JoshuaIII; 05-01-2012 at 07:47 PM.
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  19. #54
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Joshua,

    I really don't know the latin name for the Juniper that we have locally.
    All I know is that is it the first choice of wood to use for wooden trunnels up here, and always has been.
    It is very rot resistant and tough, and often is the best part of most old rotten wooden vessels...


    Cheers,
    Ole

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    And its berries are what turns alcohol into Gin
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  21. #56
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    I'm surprised Australia didn't develop an export trade to Norway with ironbark planks !

    Trunnel suppliers to the world !
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  22. #57
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Way back when I had dreams of being a boatbuilder, I went to visit a man by the name of Johnny Williams from Beach Point, PEI. Johnny had a reputation for his Cape Islander style of fishing boats and had conducted some teaching at the local college so was a man I needed to speak with. I found him in his shop working on his last boat before retirement. She was a 46' schooner that he was building for himself so that he could fulfill a lifelong dream to sail around Newfoundland. He spoke at length about the qualities of 'swamp' juniper and how he reckoned it was good wood for boatbuilding because it was "used to" a high water content.

    That part I've never forgotten, the idea of using particular woods for particular purpose, because the wood itself is "used to it". A lesson in tradition. Minde is a beaut and thanks for your efforts in documenting your work on her, Ole. / Jim

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Jim,

    It is always facinating how different types/shapes of wood can be utilized into building a boat.
    When I am passing trees I always look for shapes that could be used into a build. "What a nice curve, that would be perfect for a stem... There you have a strong floor/frame...." etc.


    I do not have many pictures of Mindes interiour, but here you have one. There are one berth on each side, elevated a bit from the sitting-benches. There are 5 fixed berths, two of them quite wide.









    Several waterpins were installed at strategic points were water could ingress.






    After fairing the frames was complete, I started laying out where to the planking would be butted to provide sufficient strenght.
    Some compromizes was necessary, but I think it will be strong enough.


    The planks was just a tad under 2" thick and of oak, so they needed two hours in the steamer to soften up a bit.
    The lower planking is quite hard to twist, since they are vertical at the stern and about 45° forward.






    The garboard is fastened with 4" ships-spikes in the rabbet and 6" in the frames - all with a strand of oakum under the head to prevent leaking.






    First plank in....






    Cheers,

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    I'm curious about the machine in the shed. What is it?
    Chuck Thompson

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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hi Chuck,

    What machine are you refering to?

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hi Ole /

    I'm wondering about the requirements regarding the depth and diameter of pilot holes for ships spikes with that shape and if there is a risk of splitting frames. Guessing from earlier pics, it appears that the 6" spikes would go most of the way through the frames. Tks / Jim

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hello Jim,

    The ships spikes that you can see on the picture is a mix of the type we have been using up here for years (the 4") and the new type (the 6") that has been supplied recently. The boatbuilders hate the new one. Actually, it is not a new type but the production has been moved to another country, and they have not managed to get a stabile production-result. They vary a lot in dimension/shape, and have this wedge-type shank under the head.
    The type we are used to is rectangular in cross-section, and of even diameter all the way except from the tip that is a bit rounded/thinner.
    The new ones can vary a lot. Some are square in cross-section, the diameter is changing a lot from spike to spike.. I hope they manage to get a repetetive production up and going, as this is a big problem for all users.

    For a rectangular spike we drill to match the smaller side into the frame. The hole through the plank is wider, and especially with the wedge-like shank you need to be particularly aware of the danger of splitting the wood. Normally no problem, except for near the end-grain. The excessive countersink in the plank is closed by using oakum under the head.

    As for the dimension, I only use 6" in the lower frames/floors as they are a lot deeper. I will use 5" from the third row and upwards, in addition to the trunnels.


    You can see that the earlier repairs to the planking is deviating from the original planking layout, probably to remedy some bad seams.













    Both garboards in place






    /Ole

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hey Ole--I was talking about the machine in the shed next to your steam box. Maybe it is a power generation unit?
    Chuck Thompson

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Hi Chuck,

    That is the boiler for the steam box. It is heated by prophane now.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by svaap View Post
    Hello Jim,

    The ships spikes that you can see on the picture is a mix of the type we have been using up here for years (the 4") and the new type (the 6") that has been supplied recently. The boatbuilders hate the new one. Actually, it is not a new type but the production has been moved to another country, and they have not managed to get a stabile production-result. They vary a lot in dimension/shape, and have this wedge-type shank under the head.
    The type we are used to is rectangular in cross-section, and of even diameter all the way except from the tip that is a bit rounded/thinner.
    The new ones can vary a lot. Some are square in cross-section, the diameter is changing a lot from spike to spike.. I hope they manage to get a repetetive production up and going, as this is a big problem for all users.

    For a rectangular spike we drill to match the smaller side into the frame. The hole through the plank is wider, and especially with the wedge-like shank you need to be particularly aware of the danger of splitting the wood. Normally no problem, except for near the end-grain. The excessive countersink in the plank is closed by using oakum under the head.

    As for the dimension, I only use 6" in the lower frames/floors as they are a lot deeper. I will use 5" from the third row and upwards, in addition to the trunnels.

    /Ole
    The long ones that you don't like are called cut boat nails in the UK, the others are ordinary boat nails or spikes. The cut nails are literally made by cutting, they are sheared off of the end of a strip with a gillotine set to cut the taper. They are then gripped in a vice and headed up, which is why they taper the wrong way under the head. They are universal for hanging plank in UK working boats. The best way to avoid splitting the frame is to place the nail so that the chisel point is across the frames grain.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  31. #66
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Bridge spikes in Australia.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  32. #67
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Maybe my eye is fooling me as to the size of your box and steamer. Both seems huge to me but maybe I've got the wrong scale.
    Chuck Thompson

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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by svaap View Post
    Hi Chuck,

    That is the boiler for the steam box. It is heated by prophane now.

    So does this mean that swearing like a sailor can boil water?
    Freudian slips : when you say one thing but mean your mother.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Absolutely brilliant Ole! I'm in complete awe of your efforts!
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

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    Default Re: Restoration of MINDE, a 1903 Pilot Cutter

    Chuck,
    The stembox is quite large - about 50 cm by 70 cm and aprox 7 meters long. It is fitted with two rows of cross-bars to take two planks at the same time.


    Soundman67,
    I'm sorry but my English skills is not sufficient to catch your point...

    Thanks Duncan!


    I thought I'd post a picture of the messy goop that was lurking in the bilges.... Good for you that I can not include the smell...



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