Page 1 of 3 12 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 71

Thread: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Two really great designs by Atkin have always caused me to pause at the balance and visual grace seen in just viewing the line drawings... "Amos Brown" and "Maid of Endor" ... (yes there are others).

    I have never seen a photo of an "Amos Brown", and recently while experimenting with colorizing line drawings, I messed around with this favorite design from the past. Needless to say, the color illustration jumped out at me compared to the simple line drawing, and only confirmed my thoughts about this lovely design all this time... certainly one of Atkin's best. I was surprised at how she looked with her clothes on. I thought I had to share this cause the image just works for me. It would be nice to see some old photos of one of these. Although I am more interested in a trailerable design these days, she is lovely...

    RodB


    http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Sail/AmosBrown.html

    Quote from Mr Atkin:
    Seldom have I had the opportunity to design a boat purely without the influence of a client, but Amos Brown is such a craft -- one designed just for fun.
    AMOS BROWN:

    Last edited by RodB; 04-16-2012 at 04:02 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    41,964

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Rod,

    That is both Marvelous... and Gorgeous!

    Will you be doing more? I'd love to see Gretchen done that way.

    Also... I bet my friend John - who set up and maintains the Atkin website - would be interested in seeing them!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    1,368

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Lovely.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,434

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Please do some more.....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,691

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Rod, that looks great! I love the subtlety of colouring, if you're starting a list - please consider "Fore n 'Aft" the one jsjpd1 (Jim) is modeling.http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-Cutter-Model
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    703

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    beautiful work! thanks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    I need some decent sized line drawings of the hull with sailplan to do a drawing, the smaller low res images on the Atkin site are too small.

    I will post a new one now and then from my reference files or if someone emails me a nice large 8.5 X 11 at 300 dpi image.

    Peter, I have a Atkin book with several designs very nicely printed full page, I think I have "Fore and Aft" there. I'll look.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-16-2012 at 03:57 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,540

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Cool.....but fix your sail panel lines so that they are 90 degrees to a straight line from the peak to the clew. The headsails would actually work better and look neater mitre-cut (bisect the clew angle with a seam running clew to luff and run your panel seams 90 degrees to the leech and foot, meeting at the mitre (I know, picky, picky, picky....but it's my job).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    I know, I know... Todd, but someone's got to do it... it might as well be you. BTW, I looked at several boat drawings on the Bray site and got a rough idea on the sail seams from there, but did not pay attention to the stated landmarks to orient them perfectly.

    I'll fix it and get it right... Are your comments true for all these older boats? How about a diagram for any variations. How were the sail panels of boats of this era routinely sewn together in panel orientation? What would be a good width of each panel in the gaff main and the jib if different width?

    I don't mind orienting the panels any way as long as it authentic.


    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-16-2012 at 03:01 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    I think that's lovely. Alden's Malabar Jr., I mean if you are taking requests.
    "A man builds the best of himself into a boat- builds many of the memories of his ancestors." -Steinbeck

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Potomac,

    I have a line drawing of Malabar Jr in the full keel version and the plans for the CB version from Woodenboat (both are in "Fifty Wooden Boats) and if I photograph the pages, I can get a decent quality line drawing of the hull and sail plan. I actually bought the plans for the 30 foot centerboard version from Woodenboat as I have always loved the Alden designs. BTW, I think his Malabar II has the prettiest sheer of all time. I'll keep the two 30 foot Malabar Jr's in mind when I have some time.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-16-2012 at 04:02 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,540

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Old sails may either be cross-cut (panel seams 90 degrees to the leech edge) vertically cut (panel seams parallel to the leech edge) or a couple variations of mitre cuts (usually panel seams 90 degrees to the leech and foot edges, or sometimes Scotch-Mitred with panel seams parallel to the leech and foot edges). The oldest tend to be vertical cuts (squaresails, spritsails, gaff sails, lugsails, etc.) and there was a gradual transition to cross-cuts because in cotton, it made for a smoother shape. Vertical seams that stretched less than the surrounding cloth tended to make a bit of a washboard effect, disturbing airflow over the sail. I don't know the exact timeline, but most classic designs could use either type, though recreational boats and fancy old racing boats tend to be seen more often with cross-cut sails.

    Panel width is seldom more than 26", even on big yachts, as the frequent seams and false seams (fabric folded back in a "Z" cross section - looks like a seam, but there is no break in the actual cloth) helped to control cloth stretch. Smaller boats might have seams as close as 8"-10" for stretch control on light cotton if it was a premium sail. Which width to make the panels was up to the sailmaker, the cloth widths available and the budget of the customer.

    This is a vertically cut gaff main with a vertically-cut, reefable boomed jib. In order to reef a jib like this, the jib snaps below the reef have to be mounted on a jack line. This would allow the snaps to stay on the wire, but be eased away from the luff, allowing the reef tack corner to move forward, up to the stay.



    This one has a cross-cut Gaff main and foresail, with mitre-cut head and topsails. The forestaysail is club-boomed, but roller furling as the club will stand on end as the sail furls. The jib furls on the stay, the fore-topsail is free-flying and unstayed.



    As you can see, trying to get this all to work can involve just a few measurements and calculations.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    That's great Rod. I had the pleasure of going aboard a Jr. for sale not too far from here a week ago- the full keel in cutter/sloop configuration. What a lovely shape. That's one of those boats that kind of haunts you. Somehow delicate and powerful, elegant and useful- just lovely. Thanks for keeping it in mind.
    "A man builds the best of himself into a boat- builds many of the memories of his ancestors." -Steinbeck

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Todd,

    Thanks for the input... Since morning I talked to an experienced sailmaker and was told as you say... either vertical or cross cut during the period... without a clear time frame when folks switched because many traditionalists stuck with the vertical layout. Even today, he says many of his customers demand vertical cut sails to stay true to the style of their original sails.

    How about some comments on the orientation of the panels in the tops'l? I copied what I found on the Bray site... Would a mitered tops'l be appropriate??

    I appreciate your input.

    RodB

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    431

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    here's a couple of pics of Plover that I believe is based on Amos Brown. She's a little bit longer at 24'10" a little bit deeper in the keel and ketch rigged


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,540

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    That's actually the jib and the clubbed one behind it would be a forestaysail. The orientation between the panel seams and leech looks closer to correct, though I can't draw on this computer to check it exactly. A mitre-cut would work better from a sailmaking perspective. Notice that as a cross-cut sail, the panels and their weave striking the foot edge are doing so at a really steep bias angle. That edge would tend to stretch like crazy in use. Roping the foot might help prevent it to an extent, but even so, the foot would probably stretch out pretty quickly and not come back. The mitre-cut would be putting the weave of the lower section square to stress along the foot between the tack and clew corners and be drastically more stretch resistant, especially on a cotton sail. Same thing with the forestaysail, though the clubbed foot would probably hold up a little better than the jib's free-flying foot. The weave follows the seams and in this photo you can see how the weave of the miter-cut jib is oriented square to the leech and foot edges to best resist stretching out.



    You will also often find the lowest panel of a cross-cut sail split vertically into two or three pieces, especially on headsails. This isn't because the sailmaker ran out of big hunks of fabric, it's to incorporate some shaping seams into the bottom of the sail. Here is a cross-cut jib. The vertical seam on the lowest panel is actually a broadseam. The overlap of the fabric pieces slowly widens as you get closer to the foot edge at the bottom of the sail. This gives the bottom a little bit of cup-shape and firms up the foot round to eliminate flapping.



    There are all sorts of possible headsail profiles and which cut is easiest and best to build just depends on the angles present, but usually if you find a situation where an edge either has the fabric on a steep bias (like your jib) or where it has no shaping seams to work with (like your forestaysail) there may be a better way to cut it, and on traditional boats a miter is probably the best choice (and good looking).

    If you have enough shaping seams present at the edges, you can get pretty decent sailshape even with no wind, the sail hung from a tree and staked to the ground with screwdrivers. Without them, the sail would be pretty flat. Here are a cross-cut main and a mitred jib. The telltales are hanging limp, but both sails have plenty of shape-abe, broadseam-able panel seams along their luffs, leeches and foot edges and you can actually see the draft in the sails.



    These days, I probably cut 60% of the sails I build vertically. This is partly because it's more traditional for lugsails and spritsails (which I build a lot of) but also because modern fabric is much more stable than the old cotton cloth. We really don't have to worry much about the washboard problem on verticals with modern Dacron.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    OK, finally heres the Atkin "Amos Brown with the sailplan correct... Boat season has started in ernest and I have been very busy with boat repairs. ...Todd, I went with the crosscut jibs... most likely the most common at the time... and I learned some headsails are difficult to get a good pattern for miter cut sails. I'll mess with it later.

    I have developed a system of developing each design in layers in Photoshop so that each sail has a layer for color and a layer for the seams. If every different color is on a separate layer, its very easy to make changes and improve the overall colorization. Sail colors are also gradients to offer some semblance of shape. Photos of each type of wood were used to "paste into" the selections of the mast and other spars, bowsprit, etc. I actually did the both over from scratch because I have figured out better ways to produce the effects I want.

    I like Amos Brown so much that I will probably order a print from Mpix.com to admire her... also Sjogin III is lovely too.

    "AMOS BROWN" BY JOHN ATKIN


    I also completed Sjogin III, the trailerable 19 foot version of "SJOGIN"... by Paul Gartside. Now the sail seams are more correct.



    More to come as I have time...

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 05-17-2012 at 11:22 AM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    I think they both came out beautifully, Rod. Now that'd be a nice framed picture for the shop to keep you motivated.
    "A man builds the best of himself into a boat- builds many of the memories of his ancestors." -Steinbeck

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    23,545

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Definitely frame material, nice work.
    I did mine a few years back (see avatar) but not a touch on your colouring.
    Last edited by WX; 05-16-2012 at 08:17 AM.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,691

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    You certainly have the touch Rod!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Athens, OH & Hillsboro, WV
    Posts
    3,057

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Rod,

    Amos Brown certainly is lovely. Thanks for posting that! What software did you use to produce these drawings?

    Amos Brown reminds me of an Atkin boat I hope to build someday: A "Wild Onion" hull, with its nicer sheer and V-bottom



    But with the gaff-sloop sail plan from "Red Onion"



    I've got the plans and hope to build it one day if ever I am in a position where I don't have to launch and retrieve every time I go sailing.

    Wayne

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Wayne,

    I use CS5 Photoshop, but you can use any version of the real Photoshop to do this simple stuff. You need a clean sharp line drawing of the design first and in your case it would be easy copy and paste the sailplan you want on the other boat. If you can supply me with a decent line drawing (digitized) say... 8X12 @ 300 dpi... I wouldn't mind doing this for you ...you can even suggest some colors. I would do it when I had time and you could make any changes to the drawings before colorization.

    This process is not difficult in Photoshop for anyone who has a basic working knowledge of Photoshop... like selections, layers, color gradient, etc...

    RodB

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Athens, OH & Hillsboro, WV
    Posts
    3,057

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Rod,

    I was mostly curious whether your illustrations were the product of a boat-design software or a graphic software. In hindsight, I should have recognized the Atkin-produced drawing.

    While I have the plans, and a very good flatbed scanner, I doubt any of the views on the plan sheets are small enough to fit the bed of my scanner, about 9 X 12. In any event, I posted those images more as a compliment to your good taste in sailboats.

    To me, there has always been something very alluring about Atkin designs. Somehow, they seem to look just the way a boat should look. They all seem so “right.”

    If I lived on or near deep water, Amos Brown, would certainly be of personal interest to me as a build project. Lovely! And your illustration brings her alive.

    Wayne

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Well, heres Atkin's BENBOW....



    I was checking out photos of boats on the Atkin site... and a couple of Eric had a similar sail color as here... I guess it doesn't matter... I also left the hull white as it was most common.

    I have complete lines and profiles of Alden's Malabar Jr CB model from Woodenboat and also I think I have Talesin and of course The original Sjogin.

    RodB

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tuckahoe
    Posts
    7,506

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Surely competition for Anne Bray.

    Kudos, Rod.
    Steve Martinsen

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Ok, heres Crocker's design #100 "Sea Dawn" a design published in "Rudder" Magazine for the "folks". This 34 footer was designed for a bit easier construction and had several sail plans offered... the cutter was my favorite. This was a centerboard design. I actually got the pdf files for this set of plans a long time ago but I do have the book on Crocker's designs. I guess the gaff cutter sail plan is my favorite... especially with a top sail. This design, by Sam Crocker has as prettiest a gaff cutter sail plan I have seen and I love the spoon bow. I think he worked for Alden at some point, and I love his designs.





    Steve... Thanks but... Anne Bray is an artist and draws in all kinds of shape in her drawings... She does fantastic work that is very accurate and well done. I'm just playing around with Photoshop.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 05-23-2012 at 02:32 AM.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Heres a new one... these things take about 3-5 hours so it takes some time to get one right. This one had the sail panel lines already so it went a bit quicker. This one is Albert Strange's "Augustina"... and its the first one I went with a red hull. I guess the red hull could be out of the realm of what colors were used back then...but I was getting tired of the Hereshoff green. I make the original fairly large so if I like it I can print it large... then I make a lower res for here.



    I'll try to do a few more during this cold weather.

    RodB

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,691

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Do you accept suggestions Rod? Albert Strange's Cherub 111. I'd love to see her coloured !

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Peter, I love that one too. I need a decent sized line drawing which I maybe can get from Leather's book. I can't do one with a low resolution line drawing so..... let me check. If I can get an 8.5 x 11 inch line art then its easy to do it larger then create a low resolution version after I am done. Cherub III is the request... any specific colors... or just match the pic in Leathers book?

    This is the only pic I have seen of her... but I'm not enthralled with the red sails. ...



    I prefer this one with white sails... (I also like Sheila II a lot)



    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 12-27-2013 at 03:37 AM.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    3,985

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Beautiful work Rod!
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,691

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration



    This one is the closest to the original rig of Cherub 3 according to Ed Burnett who sailed on her as a boy. This boat is Emerald, based in Scotland. A high res image might be hard to find.

    and your colouring is excellent Rod !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Gulgong. Central west N.S.W. Australia
    Posts
    1,428

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Quote Originally Posted by RodB View Post
    Heres a new one... these things take about 3-5 hours so it takes some time to get one right. This one had the sail panel lines already so it went a bit quicker. This one is Albert Strange's "Augustina"... and its the first one I went with a red hull. I guess the red hull could be out of the realm of what colors were used back then...but I was getting tired of the Hereshoff green. I make the original fairly large so if I like it I can print it large... then I make a lower res for here.



    I'll try to do a few more during this cold weather.

    RodB
    Rod would you consider selling large prints of some of the boats you've colored if I offered you millions of money? They would certainly look sweet hanging on the wall in my workshop! JayInOz

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    You're doing these in photoshop? What's your method?

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Rod would you consider selling large prints of some of the boats you've colored if I offered you millions of money? They would certainly look sweet hanging on the wall in my workshop! JayInOz
    Jay... if your email provider has no limitations in general... the file is only 11MB and should go as an attachment on a regular email. I can email the high res image to you.

    You're doing these in photoshop? What's your method?
    You need to start with a hi res scan or photo of a nice line drawing of the hull/sailplan. Sharpen it and clean it up with the eraser so all you end up with is a clean clean line drawing of all that is important to the drawing on white background. Use canvass to increase the white around it and then you can begin to work. I like to have about a 24" x 24" image at 300 dpi with the boat drawing nice and large.

    Look at all the lines outlining the mast, boom, sails, hull, cabin, parts of the hull, bow sprit, etc and make sure all lines are continuous so that if you use the maqic wand to select an area surrounded by lines... it will only select that area. I usually start with the hull and decide on a color. I always want a gradation from light to dark on the hull, so I use the gradient tool. Click on the two boxes separately (foreground color and background color boxes) on the tool bar and select a color for each. You want to select two very similar colors that are different in density. Once you have selected most of the hull (hold the shift key and click with the magic wand to keep adding parts of the hull that are separated by lines so that you end up with one large selection that is the "hull" ) (more advanced... go to menu "Selection" on top of the screen and save the selection naming it "hull" if you want to come back later and re do this color).

    Now take the gradient tool and click (holding the mouse key down} at the bottom of the hull and drag it to the top of the hull and let go. This will give you a gradient of color with the darkest at the bottom and the lightest at the top and is based on the two colors you chose for your color boxes. If the color sequence is reversed, then click at the top first and drag to the bottom. This should give you a nice colorization effect with the bottom of the hull darker as if the light was shaded off by the sides of the hull. If you don't like the first attempt... hit "apple key/Z" to undo it and try again. Soon you will get the hang of how far to move the gradient tool and exactly what angle to drag it to get a dark transitioning to iight exactly how you want on the hull.

    This same process is used to do the sails... with a darker and very light color in the color boxes (foreground color and background color) with the entire sail selected... use the gradient tool to achieve a color transition that looks like a partially shaded part of the sail at the top and lighter at the bottom. This is mainly to try to show a "shape" of the sail.

    For masts and booms just go on line to Google and search for "sitka spruce" and down load a photo of vertical grain spruce and save it to your desktop. Copy a section of the wood surface with the square selection tool with the grain showing up nice and oriented properly for the mast or boom... and "paste it into "your boom or mast selection... then moving it around with the "move" tool (letter V) to fill the most area... then with the partial photo of the spruce pasted into your selection, hit "apple key" and the letter "T" to go to "free transform". This will make a box with adjustable corners around your pasted image of wood in the mast and now you just hit the "control key" and click your mouse cursor on the box someplace... and a list of items comes up... drop down to "distort" and then you can drag the image of the spruce wood to completely fill the mast from top to bottom and side to side using the corners of the box. You can stretch the hell out of the image to fill your selected mast. Oh yea... make your copied image grain oriented vertically to go along with a mast going up and down. The mast selection now looks like a long mast of spruce wood. Note:While still on this "pasted in image" use curves to brighten or darken the image in the mast if necessary (you can use "contrast/brightness" under Image adjust if you do not know how to use curves.

    For cabin sides... I go to google and find images of mahogany... keeping grain orientation appropriate for the side of the cabin. For bowsprits... I use photos of Douglas fir... I save all these photos for future use. You get the idea...


    To synopsize... make selections first of an area and paste an appropriate image into the selection that is the color and texture you want using "Transpose and distort" to get the image to fill your selection so that it looks good... or use the gradient tool with two contrasting colors of a similar hue but different densities... to place a color gradient to mimic light falling off (i.e., the bottom of the hull is darker) or on a sail to show some shape.

    I usually keep my entire image in layers once I start so that I can come back any time later and change any part of the drawing in color. This requires more knowledge in Photoshop to maintain layers and masks for gradients. When an image is worked like this...its saved as "Image name layers.jpg". This way it is very easy to come back later and change any colors or re-do something better.

    If you forgo the layers and masks for each section of the drawing its easier but a little more trouble to change the color in a section later on. If I really like a particular design, I will take the extra time to do all initial work in layers etc so that I can come back later on and re do anything I want. The end result is one "layers" image, one "flat" image... both hi resolution and a third image "lo res" in the name to put online.

    For those new to this... just select each section and colorize it and go on to the next part. As you work flatten the image from time to time when layers and layer masks are produced by your work. Be sure to keep checking you are on the original artwork layer. This will be simpler.

    Hope this helps..

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 12-27-2013 at 02:54 PM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,620

    Default Re: Atkin line drawing that impresses can amaze you in a color illustration

    Heres Alerion... one of my all time favorites... I do not have a hi res version of this... I was experimenting in low res.

    RodB


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •