Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 63

Thread: Oar Plans

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Oar Plans

    Can anyone recommend oar plans? I think maybe I'd be looking for 8 1/2', spoons? But I'm not an experienced rower so I'm not positive.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,611

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Tons of plans, including spoons, here. You might find it cheaper somewhere else.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Boats-oars-a...item5ae5b638e4

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SPID
    Posts
    6,034

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Second that recommendation.

    I built a 9' set in spruce from Culler's plans and was very pleased with the result.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Fort Collins, Co
    Posts
    7,094

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Storer has free ones over at Duck works. It is a quick way to build oars if you don't put the spoon part of it in. I have built three sets for one sheet skiff boats and like this method better than trying to split the loom at the end, cannot notice a difference on small boats.
    Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business.
    TOM ROBBINS, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,611

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I just checked for it at abebooks.com, they don't have it. Amazon has it for $73.00 used, $192.00 new. You might want to snap this one up if you can't find it at the library. It's a good book.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    St. Mary's County, MD
    Posts
    884

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by potomac View Post
    Can anyone recommend oar plans? I think maybe I'd be looking for 8 1/2', spoons? But I'm not an experienced rower so I'm not positive.
    I'll third that recommendation. There's also the newer compendium _Pete Culler on Wooden Boats_, which includes _Boats, Oars, and Rowing_, but for some reason the key full page drawing showing the dimensions of Pete's oars was left out. Mystic sells it as a separate plan. (A lot of other stuff was left out of this book, that was in the original books. To be fair, there are also some new photos and things put in, but I think the things left out were essential parts of the original books, at least for BO&R). But there is still one drawing of dimensions for one of Pete's oar designs, in the _Skiffs and Schooners_ part.

    Chesapeake Light Craft just put out a booklet on building oars, and while I have not seen it yet, I suspect that it would be a great resource, given the high quality of the other stuff that CLC produces.

    If you google around the web, you'll find several sets of free plans and instructions for building oars; Jim Michalak and Micheal Storer each come to mind. And there are several nice threads on this forum on oar building with lots of pictures.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    12,386

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Got the book. CLC has a set of plans I found, but I'll wait for the book before ordering anything else. I seem to remember Iain Oughtred had a set of plans for oars. I'll ask him about those when ordering some other boat plans from him. Thanks guys.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    The Storer plans are simple and look good. Here they are if anyone is interested. http://www.storerboatplans.com/Paddles/OAR9FT.pdf

    His paddle plans are COMPREHENSIVE. Here they are. http://www.storerboatplans.com/Paddles/PaddlesFree.pdf

    Thanks again everyone.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saco, ME
    Posts
    2,102

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by dredbob View Post
    Chesapeake Light Craft just put out a booklet on building oars, and while I have not seen it yet, I suspect that it would be a great resource, given the high quality of the other stuff that CLC produces.

    Bob
    FYI, the CLC oars have very skinny grips, much skinnier than I would want to use and I teach in my oarmaking courses. I have heard that some people want pencil-like grips but could not understand why.

    Otherwise, I think the CLC blades are nicely shaped and I don't have an opinion about the shaft sizing and shape.

    A superior set of oars are not circular in section any where except above the oar locks, if that. Keep them square up there to help counterbalance the outboard weight.

    Cheers
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    38,854

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I've build oars from Culler, Storer, and my own quick & dirty design. The owners are all quite pleased with the results. None of my clients has wanted Shaw & Tenney level refinement - but all enjoy rowing much more now than with the heavy, badly balanced, store-bought clubs they had been using.

    It is my considered opinion that any decent oar design will be a large step up from what most folks use. In fact, I am convinced that even spoon blades are overkill for most rowers. Now... if you're a serious rower, and intend to keep pursuing it... then you'll appreciate going all out. You'll notice the improvements, learn to care for your babies, and be willing to learn the technique necessary to take advantage of the upgrades
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    2,918

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton B Chase View Post

    A superior set of oars are not circular in section any where except above the oar locks, if that. Keep them square up there to help counterbalance the outboard weight.

    Cheers
    A really superior set of oars has a loom below the locks that is a ridged oval, max size in the direction of the load, minimum size at 90 degrees. Norse, guideboats etc
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Aboard my boat in an Auckland, NZ, Marina.
    Posts
    840

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Haven't built any myself, yet, but if I do I'll use the method shown in John Welsford's book "New Zealand Backyard Boatbuilder". Reckon even I could make an acceptable pair of oars that way.

    Spoons? I've just retired to reserve status a pair of very light oars which have wood looms and grp spoon blades. Apart from being a bit short for my current skiff (Bolger "Gypsy") they were getting a tad threadbare. Replaced them with a pair of ash 2.9m oars from Gull - would have been hard to buy the wood any cheaper than the cost of the "store bought" oars. When they arrived I was a bit taken aback; they looked clumsy - parallel looms from grip to blade. On first outing they felt clumsy too, and heavy. Thought I'd made a big (and expensive) mistake. By the time I'd put in four or five hours with them, though, I had acclimatised and they felt right. Certainly they were better in choppy water, as the greater weight and flat blades discouraged them from jumping out of the rowlocks like the spoons tended to do.

    One great advantage of the heavier pair is that it's easier to get into a sustainable rowing rhythm. Also ash is pretty tough stuff, which makes them better for secondary uses like poling off rocky beaches etc.

    The light spoons came with a long (6.4m) heavy boat with barely a gnat's cock more than a meter beam across the rowlocks. They moved her along pretty well, but were not as satisfactory on the Gypsy, partly because of being a bit short, partly because the Gypsy is a bit skittery. Maybe there's a rule-of-thumb to be inferred here: light oars for a heavy, narrow boat, heavy oars for a wide, light one?

    Perhaps I should mention that I'm strictly a fixed seat rower. If you're an up-river, sliding-seat man, that's a different game.
    "The truth shall make ye fret" - Terry Pratchett

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in South Central PA
    Posts
    3,317

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    See WBM No. 71 for the Pete Culler oars.


    Brian

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I found this website and thought I'd share it. http://marina.fortunecity.com/breakw...m#ROWING 2001B It's Michalak's take on Pete Culler's oar design. I like it- a single piece of 1x6 pine per oar. I'm going to try and make a go of them with a Japanese pull saw instead of a bandsaw and will report back how it goes. The design does require some lamination, part of which will be under water at least some of the time. If not using epoxy, can someone suggest an easily obtainable adhesive? 5200 or am I better off buying a very small quantity of epoxy? If so, is the stuff the dreaded HD sells okay for this application? Thanks.
    Last edited by potomac; 03-27-2012 at 09:12 PM.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,611

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    As long as your joinery is excellent and you use enough clamps but not too much pressure, as in quite snug, Titebond III will serve you well. TIII is not at all gap filling, but is waterproof. It bonds the best at room temp., probably not a problem in Fla. I rub it into the glueing surfaces with a flux brush before clamping, just to make sure it penetrates everywhere and there are no voids.

    http://www.titebond.com/titebond_woo...Wood_Glue.aspx

    5200 is thick and gooey and takes days to cure, it would not be the adhesive to use for this type of work, it's more of an adhesive bedding caulk.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I'm almost finished with a set of oars I put together for a dinghy I'm working on. Borrowed a few tips from others to come up with the final iteration.

    They are light, strong, and cheap. Just the right amount of spring to the loom and blade.

    I can't post the design here due to file attachment limitation, but I have posted it on the Tolman FishyFish forum, see http://fishyfish.com/boards/index.php/topic,2494.0.html

    A big help in developing the design is this excellent write up on using a trapezoidal shape for the loom: http://www.gacooarlocks.com/plans-for-making-oars.pdf
    Last edited by pfithian; 03-26-2016 at 08:27 AM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    just a little note, if you decide to build Michael Storer oars, I suggest making the blades 12cm wide, not 20cm wide as per the plans. Ro get the curve in the blade, use two strips of ply, epoxy both inner surfaces, then support the ends on bricks, then put bricks in the center to give curve. Use lots of clamps around the side to keep the edges together.

    8.5ft is long, mine were origianly 8.5ft long as per Michael Storer, ended up making them 10 inches shorter over time.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    One more vote in favor of Culler's B, O, & R and Titebond III.

    By the way, Barkley Sound (and probably other commercial oarmakers) used Titebond III. It's pretty freakin' waterproof, and frankly oars should be kept painted or varnished and stored in such a way that you could probably used Elmer's with no problems. I would only worry at all for oars that are left out uncovered in an infrequently-bailed boat - but if that's the kind of criminal oar abuse you plan to dish out, buy some Caviness junkers at Worst Marine!

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    S.E.Florida
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Here is a pdf of the WoodenBoat article "The Long Oars Of Pete Culler"
    from this article on Oarmaking. His articles about wrapping the oars with a serving mallet (see bottom of article ref'd above) are interesting, too.

    .
    .
    .

    "...to return to the timeless world of the mountains, the sea, the forest, and the stars is to return to sanity and truth."

    ---Robert Burnham, Jr., "Burnham's Celestial Handbook"

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,126

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Culler for straight-bladed oars (love mine) and DeLapp for curved ply-blade oars.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    2,918

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I am thinking of making a set of 9'6" oars to go with a sliding seat/ outrigged boat. Wandering on the web I have found that Angus has plans for a hollow shaft and Gacco a set for solid oars. I know about John DeLapp's and figure that they could be enlarged. Am I missing any?

    Years ago Doug Martin had a design he called a Feathor and I think they were DIY. Anyone with information?

    Gacco with his solid shaft oars says that western red cedar will work. I've used a lot of it making qajaq paddles, but never tried it for oars. Has anyone?

    Thanks and a Happy New Year
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    vancouver, british columbia
    Posts
    987

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I can't help Ben with any of his questions, but while we're waiting for someone who can...

    Can anyone explain how to cut the hollow out of the Culler oars? I bought a gouge because I couldn't think of anything better 10 years ago and I thought it might be a chance to "master" a new tool. I won't say how long I spent with that gouge on those 8 hollows - but it felt like I was more "compressing" the spruce into place than planing it off. I could keep the blade sharp but as the days - yes days - wore on I became increasingly frustrated. I didn't want to touch that nice spruce with any power tool so I suffered on.

    Any help would be a great service to the hapless first-timer. Or the hapless second-timer.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    I am thinking of making a set of 9'6" oars to go with a sliding seat/ outrigged boat. Wandering on the web I have found that Angus has plans for a hollow shaft and Gacco a set for solid oars. I know about John DeLapp's and figure that they could be enlarged. Am I missing any?

    Years ago Doug Martin had a design he called a Feathor and I think they were DIY. Anyone with information?

    Gacco with his solid shaft oars says that western red cedar will work. I've used a lot of it making qajaq paddles, but never tried it for oars. Has anyone?

    Thanks and a Happy New Year
    Ben,

    Here's that interminable thread where I made a set of 9'6" spoon blades with much help from the forum. They are very much like DeLapp's but with laminated DF and redwood solid shafts. 3.6 lb per oar and still my favorites, the laminated shafts have not taken any bend since building.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...de-wooden-oars



    Angus' oars are labor intensive to make the nice hollow shafts. He calls out glassing the blades which IMO is too much weight and not necessary if laminated blades are used.

    Rick

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,321

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I'm going to upset a few folks here ands say Pete Culler did not design the best oars. The blade of his oars is too long http://www.riverswest.org/uploads/1/...uller_oars.pdf . When the immersed oar is in the water the centre of effort is assumed to be roughly 1/3 from the tip, and that pretty much reflects my personal experience. When you pull on the oar, the area of the blade which is inboard of the 'centre or effort' is pushing backwards against the water as it pivots, diminishing slightly the effective drive of the oar.
    I have two nearly identical pairs of oars but one with a shorter slightly wider spoon blade than the other which has a spoon blade at least 6" longer. The shorter wider blades are significantly easier to propel the same boat at speed. The difference is really noticeable, particularly punching into a chop and wind.
    I note that Colin Angus builds his oars with shorter wider spoon blades. https://angusrowboats.com/pages/wooden-oars .....I would copy them, Ok not sure I'd go to hollow looms and stuff but the blade shape is more efficient in my opinion. The part about locating the oar collar is important. I would choose the length based on the half beam of the boat, focusing on the inboard/outboard loom ratio.

    I note that 'Greenland' style kayak paddles have a long slender blade but the action is completely different. With a Greenland paddle the whole thing is much shorter than a standard double paddle and it is rocked back and forth from side to side so the blade is entering the water and working in a nearly vertical position, and the fulcrum is in the arms and shoulders, not attached to the boat.
    Last edited by gilberj; 12-30-2016 at 05:57 PM.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    I'm going to upset a few folks here ands say Pete Culler did not design the best oars. The blade of his oars is too long http://www.riverswest.org/uploads/1/...uller_oars.pdf . When the immersed oar is in the water the centre of effort is assumed to be roughly 1/3 from the tip, and that pretty much reflects my personal experience. When you pull on the oar, the area of the blade which is inboard of the 'centre or effort' is pushing backwards against the water as it pivots, diminishing slightly the effective drive of the oar.
    I have two nearly identical pairs of oars but one with a shorter wider spoon blade than the other which has a spoon blade at least 6" longer. The shorter wider blades are significantly easier to propel the same boat at speed.
    I note that Colin Angus builds his oars with shorter wider spoon blades. https://angusrowboats.com/pages/wooden-oars .....I would copy them, Ok not sure I'd go to hollow looms and stuff but the blade shape is more efficient in my opinion. The part about locating the oar collar is important. I would choose the length based on the half beam of the boat, focusing on the inboard/outboard loom ratio.
    I agree. Many folks argue that long blades are better in rough water, but I like shorter wider blades due to this improved efficiency. Feathering works in waves, even if you just let a wave knock the oar into feather. Steever's oar formulas show short wide blades are more efficient than long narrow. He discusses the water pivot, the point on the oar which is not moving forward or backward in the water. The oar outboard of the water pivot moves backward and pushes the boat forward. If any blade is in the water inboard of the water pivot it pushes the wrong way and wastes effort.
    Last edited by rgthom; 12-30-2016 at 06:03 PM. Reason: more Steever notes

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fairfield, CA
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I also have a copy of PDF plans for tapered, oval neck, hollow shaft, birdsmouth construction, laminated, spoon blade, 9' 6" oars, written by Joel Herzel and forwarded to me by forumite Tom Hoffman. I don't have permission to publish to the world, but I'm sure it is fine to send a copy to any forum member interested. Please PM me with an email to send it to.
    There are 40 pages of discussion and instruction, which seems like a lot, but the actual construction seems straightforward using a birdsmouth router cutter. The result is sub-3 lb wooden sculls, probably as light as can be done.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Victoria BC, Canada
    Posts
    445

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    I would try a curved spokeshave. I found a regular spokeshave would cut a slight hollow, I expect the curved one would let you match the pictured hollows.

    Jamie

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    I can't help Ben with any of his questions, but while we're waiting for someone who can...

    Can anyone explain how to cut the hollow out of the Culler oars? I bought a gouge because I couldn't think of anything better 10 years ago and I thought it might be a chance to "master" a new tool. I won't say how long I spent with that gouge on those 8 hollows - but it felt like I was more "compressing" the spruce into place than planing it off. I could keep the blade sharp but as the days - yes days - wore on I became increasingly frustrated. I didn't want to touch that nice spruce with any power tool so I suffered on.

    Any help would be a great service to the hapless first-timer. Or the hapless second-timer.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    2,918

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Orr View Post
    I would try a curved spokeshave. I found a regular spokeshave would cut a slight hollow, I expect the curved one would let you match the pictured hollows.

    Jamie
    Two tool I have used. A wooden sole backing out plane, made from an old small wooden sole plane I had kicking around. And a cabinet scraper ground to a curve ( I think you can buy them) and sharpened on a 45 degree bevel so it takes more wood. A simple tool is a wooden backing block shaped to the desired curve, then serious stickback sandpaper glued to it.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    I can't help Ben with any of his questions, but while we're waiting for someone who can...

    Can anyone explain how to cut the hollow out of the Culler oars? I bought a gouge because I couldn't think of anything better 10 years ago and I thought it might be a chance to "master" a new tool. I won't say how long I spent with that gouge on those 8 hollows - but it felt like I was more "compressing" the spruce into place than planing it off. I could keep the blade sharp but as the days - yes days - wore on I became increasingly frustrated. I didn't want to touch that nice spruce with any power tool so I suffered on.

    Any help would be a great service to the hapless first-timer. Or the hapless second-timer.
    I've used this one - slightly rounded bottom. A bit wider would have been better, I guesss...


  31. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    vancouver, british columbia
    Posts
    987

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Thank you Jamie and Ben - very good suggestions. I don't know why I couldn't have thought of those things myself. I guess that's the curse of the first-timer - you only learn about the easy way long after the fact.
    ThorBlue - your picture is not showing up for me.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    604

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    Thank you Jamie and Ben - very good suggestions. I don't know why I couldn't have thought of those things myself. I guess that's the curse of the first-timer - you only learn about the easy way long after the fact.
    ThorBlue - your picture is not showing up for me.

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...,41182&p=57205

    this little curved palm plane was hugely helpful in making a couple of Culler pattern oars out of sassafras a few years back, nice control, easy to sharpen, can use against a fence etc.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    vancouver, british columbia
    Posts
    987

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Skegemog View Post
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...,41182&p=57205

    this little curved palm plane was hugely helpful in making a couple of Culler pattern oars out of sassafras a few years back, nice control, easy to sharpen, can use against a fence etc.
    Looks about perfect for the task - thank you.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    1,556

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    I'm going to upset a few folks here ands say Pete Culler did not design the best oars. The blade of his oars is too long http://www.riverswest.org/uploads/1/...uller_oars.pdf . When the immersed oar is in the water the centre of effort is assumed to be roughly 1/3 from the tip, and that pretty much reflects my personal experience. When you pull on the oar, the area of the blade which is inboard of the 'centre or effort' is pushing backwards against the water as it pivots, diminishing slightly the effective drive of the oar.
    I have two nearly identical pairs of oars but one with a shorter slightly wider spoon blade than the other which has a spoon blade at least 6" longer. The shorter wider blades are significantly easier to propel the same boat at speed. The difference is really noticeable, particularly punching into a chop and wind.
    It is a little like driving with the hand brake on. Very frustrating on a long haul across a large lake with the new, and rather disappointing long blade spoons. Pete liked heavy boats with a lot of carry. Slow heavy boats make for a lot of slip, so the long blades are not dragging as obviously as in a lighter, faster boat.

    03-26-2012, 06:15 PM Amazon has it for $73.00 used, $192.00 new. Well, if you wait for a few years it comes up for $16 now. https://www.amazon.com/Boats-Oars-Ro.../dp/0877420947

    Hollowing:
    Try a cooper's scorp. http://greg-aroundtheshop.blogspot.c...orp-rehab.html
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    2,323

    Default Re: Oar Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by sharpiefan View Post
    Here is a pdf of the WoodenBoat article "The Long Oars Of Pete Culler"
    from this article on Oarmaking. His articles about wrapping the oars with a serving mallet (see bottom of article ref'd above) are interesting, too.
    That link shows an interesting variation on the 3 peice lamination of the Culler oar .http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--LrWtThXd6...0/DSCN0563.JPG


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •