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Thread: "Slicer"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern neck of virginia
    Posts
    1,039

    Default "Slicer"

    A friend of mine wants to build (Bolger's?) "Slicer". Anyone got opinions, comments on this hull? 29' loa with a 15 hp outboard.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    50,073

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Trescool.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Huntington, WV
    Posts
    961

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Is this it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    50,073

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Yep.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bow, Wa
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Reminds me of the ubiquitous 'panga' seen all around the world. I suspect that fuel efficiency might be one reason for their popularity. How will your friend use his?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    7,877

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Don't moor it where they charge by the foot.

    It's a cool boat
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    12,949

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    I have only read whats on the web......its a fuel and speed efficient boat,not too sure about its load carrying ability. As already asked, whats your friends intentions with it? I like it,just too long for my berth.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    21,980

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    In Boats With An Open Mind, PCB describes Slicer as a "16 foot boat with a 13-foot bow fairing." It was designed for a guy who kept his boat moored. There are build pics in the book.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern neck of virginia
    Posts
    1,039

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    The irony of it is this. I knew of a guy up the Rappahannock river with a long skinny boat. I've been wanting to go see it for a year or more, but haven't. Then my friend tells me the other day that he had lofted a boat he wanted to build.
    He sais, "I have everything, the plywood, the lumber, the epoxy, even a 15 hp motor."
    So I tell him about this guy up the river with the long skinny boat.
    When I googled "slicer", the very boat from up the Rapp is for sale.... Bolger's Slicer. It can be yours with trailer for $8500.00.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Hi gang, I just joined, having found this thread topic in a Google search. I'm the guy up on the Rappahannock with the Bolger Slicer. Happy for any and all to come by and have a look. Happy to answer any questions about construction, handling, care and feeding, and you know the rest. Is she for sale? Isn't every boat? Actually, I can't say enough for her. I think Phil was very disappointed in the guy who commissioned the boat, so he was glad to see me come along (sucker no. 2) and pick it up. I hired a professional builder and he brought it to completion in July 2003. Any and all deviations from the plans you have seen in BWAOM were approved by Phil himself, and there aren't many. Chief of which is hull material. It is a fiberglass sandwich of 3/8 Coosa foam, great stuff, acts almost like plywood but lighter weight. Chief complaint? None really. I never attached splash rails so it gets wet in 2 and 3-foot chop. Economy? As it says in my Duckworks notice, 15 hp 4-stroke Yamaha outboard at 15 mph for 15 miles on one gallon of gasohol. And boy, the trips I have taken in her! I almost (but not quite) gave up sailboats. It's like having your own Navy frigate. PONY

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Howdy, y'all. I bought PONY last fall from the Deltaville Maritime Museum in Virginia. Such a cool boat but terrible to trailer around. I've been working on some trailer modifications in my spare time, of which I do not have a lot. The long (really long) trailer is made out of I-beam and looks really funny attached to my 4-cylinder Tacoma.

    I've already reversed the locations of the bow stop and the winch on the trailer. Previously, the bow stop was below the winch, and the eye on the bow had a tendency to get hung up on it. The rig still seems safe, but is there any reason not to do that?

    I bought a pair of ladder stabilizers and some PVC to make a pair of guides, one pair at the end corners of the trailer and one about where the boat's beam sits when hauled onto the trailer. Is that a better idea than side bunks? The thing about a near 30' boat is when the trailer is in the water it's IN the water. I figure the guides at the end of the trailer will have to be 5' tall or so to break the surface when the trailer is wet.

    Before, the boat was near impossible to wrestle onto the right spot, even with no wind or current. That was with two of us (both large gents in their 30s) attempting it at a couple of landings north of Charleston.

    The boat came with a 2003 Yamaha 15hp that pushes her along nicely. I'm curious though, this being a semi-displacement boat as I understand it, how would the boat perform with a smaller high-thrust motor? I've read a lot about high-thrust being for slower boats -- but how slow? Is 12-15 slow or fast? It feels fast -- this boat really feels like a giant powered surf board, ha.

    PONY also came with a remote throttle and stick steering. The helm is about a third of the boat's length back from the bow. Everything I read about it being a 16' skiff with a long cutwater makes me think this is the too far forward to place a 220 lb dude like me. Would the boat perform better with the weight concentrated more towards the back half or so? The wiring in the throttle remote, which was spliced in with those folding tap connectors, is all wrong -- the key switch has to be on for the motor to run but doesn't activate the starter (1. turn key on; 2. go 20 feet aft and push the starter button on the motor), and the lines about the stick steering come off the rigging sometimes (too many blocks and turns, plus the motor itself pinches the line when turning one way). There's a good bit of play, and a whole lot of friction.

    Long story short, I'm thinking about either complicating the matter by moving the steering station aft and building a center console, OR simplifying by going back to the original tiller steering and chopping out the tapped wiring for the remote throttle. I figure if I ever decide to sell it, the center console might help its resale value (or sellability altogether) down in Charleston where everyone seems to have some version of the same looking boat. Then again, I'll probably get the thing in the water and have less trouble all around if I go back to the original tiller control.

    I've only had the boat in the water three times this year due to its complications. I'd like to stop thinking about it and start making those changes. Any ideas will help me get going faster. Thanks!
    Last edited by fatschoonerrat; 10-04-2015 at 07:46 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    A friend in BC built one, but took 3 feet out of the designed length. It seems like a really good boat. He has a Yamaha 30 on it, but uses it for commuting long distances. It carries a load really well and handles reasonably well in chop. It's narrow, but not tender. For it's simplicity, it seems hard to beat.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    This isn't the same boat, but it is 31 feet long. The interesting thing about it is that it folds in half for transport. That looks easy to do and would make trailering much easier if you could swing it. https://www.instantboats.com/product...er-31-0-x-5-0/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Managed to add a picture of it:
    Bolger folding schooner.jpg

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,423

    Default Re: "Slicer"

    Quote Originally Posted by green-go View Post
    Managed to add a picture of it:
    Bolger folding schooner.jpg
    I sailed in a Folding Schooner, and watched it get loaded onto a trailer. Fairly simple process to fold it up, but it did take a few (half dozen?) helpers. Certainly makes for easier towing!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

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