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Thread: Building an Oyster Barge

  1. #71

    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Very nicely done! I am enjoying the pictures greatly!

    Just out of curiosity, did you do any type of weight study to estimate how deep she will float and how much freeboard you'll end up with?

    Keep up the good work!

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Thank you.

    I am keeping track of the weight of all the materials used in it to roughly determine how deep it will float. I am fairly sure it will float high but a concern is the fore and aft angle in the water.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Looks very nice..... Heavy...... But nice.
    And I'm very jealous of your lawn....

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Thanks also, it must be the photos that make the yard look good because it really doesn't. That is a wheat field about 60 feet away from the boat and that looks good

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    The next framing phase for this boat will be either notching the stringers into the floors or installing the frames between the chines and the sheer clamp. I don't think it matters which one is done first.
    The stringers are 2 x 6's flat- spaced about 14" apart depending on where they are located. The stringers will run parallel to the centerline and the chine is farther apart amidships so the distance between the outer stringer and the chine will vary. At this time I think the outer stringer will not go to the bow; it will end on a floor about 7 feet from the bow. It will be so close to the chine at this point it will not be necessary structurally and will lighten up the bow. The frames are oak and the spacing has not been determined but about 16 to 18 inches apart.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    We have installed the last 2 floors and generally cleaned things up such as removing ply mock-ups of certain stations and battens that are not needed. It is starting to come together. We are now scarfing the stringers.
    I am a house carpenter so most of the material like ply for patterns and the mold lumber came from other projects. Most of it has been used more than once and probably will be again.





    This building was a cover for a portable sawmill that I had for awhile. That pile in the background is leftover from the milling. I milled the lumber for this building with the sawmill. I then used the building as a place to do a major repair to the decks and house of a 27' boat which took about a year. And now for this project.





    This is a building that I built for my wife. It is mostly from recycled wood and all of the siding, cornice and trim is cypress. All of material except the roof came from structures I dismantled. It is her workshop.

    Last edited by waltwood; 05-19-2012 at 10:23 AM.

  7. #77

    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    looking great! I am thinking of building a work barge down here in florida for setting piles so I am going to follow your posts carefully so I might learn something.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    I did some dock building here but the regulations and getting a permit were so difficult I stopped doing it. i will let you know when I launch this one if it would be good for setting piling.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post

    when you replace { } with [ ] you will get:



    Try it, you will like it
    when you replace { } with [ ] you will get:
    Nope, it didn't work for me. I tried it and I still have the same old crappy chisels!
    .............................

    This is a great project, thanks for taking the time to post it and the photos!

    Regarding wood preservatives, long ago there were problems using treated wood around livestock, as they would lick the wood for the salts and die. That has probably been remedied by now I would suppose. The "Timbor" brand borax insecticide/fungicide is cheap, 25lbs of powder for $80 - $90. 1 1/2 lbs powder makes 1 gallon which covers 200 sq feet. The polyethylene glycol mentioned before in "BoraCare" borax products, I believe acts as a hydroscopic surfactant, it "makes water wetter" and so it doesn't just dry out like Timbor and leave the powder on and just below the surface, but allows it to soak in more initially and then keep getting drawn in over time until penetration is much deeper if not all the way through in boards like 2x stuff.

    Some try and make Timbor into BoraCare by using anti-freeze (ethylene glycol) and I can't see how it wouldn't work as far as hydroscopic, surfactant properties, but I don't know for sure. One thing for sure is the anti-freeze version of glycol is highly toxic , which works well as far as an insecticede even by itself without the borax. The main problem though is it's sweet and everything likes it, from dogs to kids. You probably can't paint over it either. But if someone wanted to use it, I can't see why used antifreeze wouldn't work. It's free and quik oil change auto places must have a lot they would love to get rid of.

    Plywood. At the school there was a sheet left over from construction that laid on the ground for a year. It was perfectly flat when I picked it up and brought it home, and never did warp as it dried. It was 3/4" fir, made up of 7 equally thick layers. I traced it to the local lumberyard and found out it was BC Ext. fir, I would guess Douglas fir. AC ply is mainly useless nowdays, the A side being a very thin veneer and then usually 5 layers of crummy mystery wood. We used to get concrete "form ply" from the lumberyard that was excellent plywood, stable, 7 or 9 plys (3/4" or maybe 7/8") and no voids, but it was oiled, which would eliminate glue, fiberglassing etc. It is possible though that it was oiled at the lumberyard, and could be gotten clean if you told them to "hold the oil".

    Polyester on plywood works, it's been done a lot. The price difference with epoxy used to be extreme, but not so much anymore. Being thrifty (My wife says 'cheap', but then I don't have 109 pairs of shoes, so what do I know) I never considered epoxy, but I might now. I remember reading of a NE fish boat maker who still used polyester with success. From what I remember an important part of his procedure was exposing new wood with a light overall grinding of 50 grit, vacuuming and then immediately laminating. I wish I could tell you more, as the first interface between the wood and glass is the most critical, but I don't remember.

    It wouldn't cost much at all to do some small test panels trying different processes and see which works best. I would think whichever one was the hardest to peel apart would be the best.

    Some people lay the glass on dry wood and go from there. I always have problems with the glass gelling enough to become unworkable and resin won't penetrate anymore, but the ply can/will still pull resin from the laminate and leave dry spots. So I always resined the wood, let that set and then came at it with the laminate. You have a fairly heavy laminate at 32 oz, I guess it's a layer of 1 1/2 oz mat and one of 18 oz woven roving. I'm not sure if you can wet that out from one side if it's stitched together or something. If they're separate it's no problem. If you thin the resin to try to get penetration into the wood, use styrene instead of acetone. The acetone flashes off, cools the resin down and leaves it thick, the styrene is more compatible and gives it more of the 'hydroscopic, surfactant' properties. Some say wiping the bare wood clean with acetone "contaminates" the surface. Or maybe "seals" it somewhat. I don't know. You'd think after 60-70 years there would be definitive cut and dried answers, but it seems like it's a mixture of alchemy, politics and hope.

    Aside from all that, what sort (like bolts, nails or screws-stainless, galvanized)of fasteners are you using? How will you fasten the ply skin? What kind of glue? Will this boat have a cabin or flush decks and such? Thanks again.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    I really laughed at the 109 pairs of shoes. I am called cheap also.

    I am using West epoxy on the scarf joints but otherwise not much other glueing. I bolted the bow and stern assemblies with 3/8" galvanized bolts. Most of the other fasteners will be screws. I am using screws made by a German co.- Altenloh, Brinck & Co. They are called HCR for High Corrosion Resistant. The Man. says they are tested to a high salt level. They are steel but with a coating on them that seems to be very durable. I am using some #14 by 3 1/2" screws in the framing which is really a large screw. I am using some stainless screws where the size was not available in the HCR screws. Also most of these screws will be buried in the structure and I know they will still be subject to corrosion but with the boat glassed it should be mainly fresh water in the bilge. I sheathed and glassed a 32' barge many years ago and it is dusty in that bilge- almost no moisture.

    The ply is A-B Marine fir and I got a good deal on the 3/4". It will go on the bottom and 1/2" on the sides and both fastened with screws. The marine ply is very flat and that is one thing I like about it. I have a complicated fastening schedule for the ply because of different framing members have different thicknesses. I am using about 5 different length screws and 2 diameters.
    Last edited by waltwood; 05-27-2012 at 09:28 PM.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    I like your little building, Walt. What does the queen do in her workshop? Don't forget to cut limber holes in the bottom frames 'for you lay the plywood.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    I thought about the limber holes early on but forgot about them so I appreciate the reminder. In my wife's little house she does crafts, dries herbs and flowers and gets away from me.

    Have you seen the Buyboat being worked on in Urbanna? I have been over twice to see it. It should be on this site.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Quote Originally Posted by waltwood View Post

    Have you seen the Buyboat being worked on in Urbanna? I have been over twice to see it. It should be on this site.
    No, I haven't. Guess you came by water? D'you fish? Catchin any flounder? Trout?

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrleft8 View Post
    Looks very nice..... Heavy...... But nice.
    And I'm very jealous of your lawn....
    I'm jealous of more than just the lawn, until it's mowing time of course. Lovely little house- the happiest times of my ten years in New York were spent in a cabin no bigger than that- nice to distill everything down to the essential. The foundation's a great touch.
    "A man builds the best of himself into a boat- builds many of the memories of his ancestors." -Steinbeck

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Nice Job! I will be watching Keep the pictures coming!

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Eddie-I came by land. It is 30 miles by water and 145 miles by land. I don't fish.

    Potomac- Since you mentioned the little buildings foundation, it came an old house that was torn down. After the house was demolished there was a small foundation inside the main foundation and it was not supporting the structure. I used the brick from that small foundation for this building.

    Wely- Thanks for the encouragement and I am trying to keep it rolling.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    The most recent progress is working on the stringers. After scarfing together 4 stringers the notching of the floors took place to make them flush on the bottom. The stringers will give some longitudinal stiffness and provide more support for the plywood. They will also tie the floors together. Here are a few shots of the first stringer installation.













    Last edited by waltwood; 06-17-2012 at 12:59 PM.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Very nice!...... But...... How do you know that those are the stringers, and not something else?...... And how do you know which side of the barge they go on, and which side is up (or down)?


    And on a more serious note: I would strongly recommend that you not use automobile anti-freeze, or ethylene glycol as a vehicle to dilute borate. The Bora-Care product uses polyethylene glycol, which becomes inert (IE: non toxic), and hydrostatic when cured. Ethylene glycol never becomes inert, and stays hydroscopic until it leaches out of your lumber and into the water or soil under it.
    I know there are stubborn old cusses that'll argue that they've used it for years and years, and it's never killed them, or their dog, but I'll point them to the chain smoking 80 Y/O man with the baggy 15 Y/O mutt..... Some people get lucky..... Most of us.....Not.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Okay, I thought someone might say something about all my notes but I labeled my block to test the housings as I cut them because the stringers measure 1 3/8" x 5 3/8" and I have many 2 x 6 blocks laying around and did not want to mix it up with one of them.

    Thanks for the info, I would not use ethylene glycol but I do want to try borate. Since I am using treated for the framing the inside of the plywood should be the only concern about rot.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Both Tim-Bor and Bora-Care work very nicely.... A few weeks ago I pulled out a gallon of Bora-Care concentrate that I bought 18 years ago, and found that the borate had separated from the polyethylene glycol solution..... I turned the jug over and yesterday I took a look..... It's going to need a few more flip cycles, but it looks promising. 1 gallon of concentrate makes 2 gallons of solution, and covers a lot of raw lumber. A lot, like several hundred square feet.....

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Completed notching the floors and installing the 4 stringers. The first one took me 3 hours to notch the floors and the fourth one took 1 1/2 hours. I guess that is about how it should be. The next step is to bevel the chines and install the frames, the last pic is milling the frame stock.





    Last edited by waltwood; 06-16-2012 at 05:11 PM.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Keep it coming. Looking good.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    I've been looking for that sock! How'd that get down there!?
    Looking very good!

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    That's not a sock, that's a Starrett Pro-Site Protractor carrying case!


    Last edited by waltwood; 06-16-2012 at 05:15 PM.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Ah...... My mistake! I have a sock (just the one) that looks almost exactly like that!.... Now I know where they got the idea from....

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Installing frames is the latest job. There are 30 of them and about 26 are fitted and 4 are fastened. They go fairly fast except for the many trips to the shop.




    There is a large machine too close to my boat!














    Last edited by waltwood; 06-17-2012 at 01:02 PM.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    All of the frames are installed. I left them long at the sheer because I am not certain how they will tie in with other deck framing. They are cut even with bottom framing. I am close to laying some plywood on but I have a few other things going on. When I start the ply I want to work on it fairly consistently.





    This is my son installing the frames.





    On the end of the building there is a tarp to block the west sun. It works great but it makes it difficult to take pictures from that angle.


  28. #98
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Here is what I have done during this very hot weather. Installed oak center frame in bow to fasten boweye to and to provide more support for transom ply.








    Here I am using my pattern that used for the bow framing for the finish ply .




    This is the 3/4" ply cut and in place.



    Last edited by waltwood; 07-06-2012 at 03:33 PM.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    WOW! That is a "Large Barge".
    I hope someday to get over that way and ride out with you on an Oyster Barge trip.
    I'd like to know what you do out there with a Jon boat that big?

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    It does seem pretty big and I think it will look larger when I turn it over with a beam of almost 12'.

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    The larger of the 2 pieces of the stern transom ply installed. I am using a ply butt block epoxied rather than breaking the joint between the 2 pieces on a frame. I think it is stronger and less likely to split the frame.



  32. #102
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Thud, many people are growing them in the bay and the creeks here. They use a vinyl covered metal wire cage that has "legs" on the bottom that keeps the oysters out of the mud. They start out with a finer mesh cage and change them to a larger mesh as they grow larger. The proposed use of this barge is to transport the cages full of oysters as they grade them and when they are finally harvested.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    She sure looks hell for stout!

    I like your saw scabbard.
    - Bill T.

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    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  34. #104
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Quote Originally Posted by waltwood View Post
    The larger of the 2 pieces of the stern transom ply installed. I am using a ply butt block epoxied rather than breaking the joint between the 2 pieces on a frame. I think it is stronger and less likely to split the frame.


    Is it too late to pull that piece off and lay a scarf into the end to join another sheet into it, rather than use the butt block?

    The rest of the frame seems pretty canon proof but this kind of joint in ply doesn't look too strong. Unless you put a big strip of bi-ax glass over it.

    BTW, great looking shop you've got there! Really nice set up, and big too!
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

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  35. #105
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    Default Re: Building an Oyster Barge

    Duncan, this joint is strong I think. I epoxied the butt block to the larger sheet off of the boat and let it harden. Then after fastening it to the stern I ran screws thru the butt block and wet epoxy to act as clamps. I removed the screws after it hardened. I have tested pieces that have been done like this and they are very strong. In this boat it really did not matter too much, I probably didn't have to even use a butt block because of the large amount of contact area on the frames and the small amount of unsupported ply. The transom is getting 2 layers of 32 oz cloth over it also.


    Last edited by waltwood; 07-07-2012 at 06:11 PM.

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