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Thread: Cutting a rolling bevel

  1. #1
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    Default Cutting a rolling bevel

    I am so spoiled by this saw...



    Today I went up to my shop to trim the feet that I am making for my stern/bar and it turned out to be a rolling bevel. Unfortunately I was alone. The switch to change the angle of the cut is on the outfeed side of the saw. So I had to start my cut, walk around the saw and pull the wood through as I changed the bevel on the saw.

    I think I am going to put a second momentary switch on the infeed side of the saw with some sort of angle indicator, maybe a pendulum swinging along a curved brass plate with the angles marked on it.

    How in the world would you cut a rolling bevel on a curve without a tilting bandsaw?
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Quote Originally Posted by shade of knucklehead View Post
    How in the world would you cut a rolling bevel on a curve without a tilting bandsaw?
    Lucky you! Not a lot of those around.

    With a handsaw or sabre saw and the stock sawhorsed over a mirror? Or simply cut a flat bevel to the least angle and work the roll into it with a drawknife and plane? (If it's a frame your cutting, you'll have to adjust for a fair fit after the frames are set up anyway.) Or with a router and a long edging bit run along a batten with wedges under it set to match the roll of the bevel tacked on top of the workpiece?

    Seriously.

    I'm sure others have solved this problem in other ways.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    I have cut and handplaned rolling bevels before. That's how I make planks when I am working on a boat away from the shop. I think this saw makes me a bit lazy though, the cuts I made on those two pieces could of been done with a handsaw and a block plane and chisel, but instead I drove up to work and cut them...
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Nobody likes a show-off.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Incredible saw..

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    hehe

    Its a valid question though, how to cut one on that saw without a helper to control the angle.

    Notice the belt and motor attached to the hand crank to change the angle? After Pop bought it, he cranked it over to 45 degrees and back once and put that on there.
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    If you could come up with a simple way to know where you are on the board , and put a step motor on the tilt control , and find a friend who knows how CNC's work . With a few reference angles , and the right program , that could be a potent piece or equipment

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel with router table

    I’m needing to produce a number of smallish (2” x 12”) parts with a rolling bevel and thinking of using a double bearing trim router bit whose cutting length (2”) is just greater than the thickness of the part, templates stuck to the top and bottom faces of the part. Each of the templates would ride on a bearing and the part would be rocked to keep the two templates in contact with their bearing. The variation in the bevel is maybe 10 degrees. Probably will need some kind of fixture to hold the part.


    Might this work?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel with router table

    Quote Originally Posted by JimConlin View Post
    I’m needing to produce a number of smallish (2” x 12”) parts with a rolling bevel and thinking of using a double bearing trim router bit whose cutting length (2”) is just greater than the thickness of the part, templates stuck to the top and bottom faces of the part. Each of the templates would ride on a bearing and the part would be rocked to keep the two templates in contact with their bearing. The variation in the bevel is maybe 10 degrees. Probably will need some kind of fixture to hold the part.


    Might this work?
    A spoke shave or draw knife might be safer.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel with router table

    Quote Originally Posted by JimConlin View Post
    I’m needing to produce a number of smallish (2” x 12”) parts with a rolling bevel and thinking of using a double bearing trim router bit whose cutting length (2”) is just greater than the thickness of the part, templates stuck to the top and bottom faces of the part. Each of the templates would ride on a bearing and the part would be rocked to keep the two templates in contact with their bearing. The variation in the bevel is maybe 10 degrees. Probably will need some kind of fixture to hold the part.


    Might this work?
    Jim, if I understand what you are thinking of... If you try it I'm pretty sure you'll need to extend the templates on both sides of the part. This is so the bearings will contact the template before the cutters engage. Otherwise you'll experience terrible chatter and probably kickback.

    But I agree with Nick that a spokeshave will be safer and faster unless you have so many parts to make that the setup is time worthy.

    Jeff

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    (Wow. Just noticed Jim's post revived a thread from a decade ago....)

    The surfaces being worked are for joining or the final, exposed surface?

    Can you show us a picture of one of your workpieces with some indication of what you want to accomplish with this operation?

    I'd use a spokeshave, or a proper disc sander w/ tilting table; adjust the table a little as you work the bevel onto your workpieces.

    Short workpieces aren't at all safe to work on with a router, whether hand-held or table-mounted.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Will certainly extend the templates.
    The part is a ‘claw’ of salad tongs and has a tighter curve than I think i could spokeshave.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Copy Jim Crickets bandsaw set up.
    Quote Originally Posted by jim_cricket View Post


    By clamping a thin guide to the bandsaw table and holding the lower edge of the stave firmly against the guide, we twist the stave while sawing to the line. It sounds dicey, but with a sharp blade it goes pretty smoothly. That’s the interior face, and the fit is checked on the boat. If that’s good, we take a 7/8” wide pattern and mark both forward and aft faces of the stave, and go back to the bandsaw to cut two twisting, parallel faces. It’s tricky, but after a few pieces, you get the hang of it. I doubt this explanation is really understandable, but I tried. The pics should help.


    You should probably screw a handle to the back of the wood, to keep your fingers away from the blade.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    My bandsaw’s table takes a lot of force to tilt. It’d require a helper.

    All of the bevels are from square to a mild acute angles. I’m visualizing a fixture that has the templates on the top and bottom, a channel for the ‘victim’ on the side and some kind of handle on the top or back. As it’s run past the router bit, it’ll be rocked upward to keep both templates in contact with their pilot bearings.

    We’ll see how it works.

    This is the kind of bit.
    2EF10938-6E32-4951-A1F6-E29A2B1ADA86.jpeg

  15. #15
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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Here is a modification to my old Delta 14" Bandsaw to allow one man cutting of rolling bevels:

    file:///Users/paulschweiss/Documents...dsaw Movie.MOV
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Well the movie link does not seem to work?

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Basically it is a 24vdc wheelchair motor hooked to an acme rod that moves the table up and down. The gray box has a long cord to allow standing back and feeding stock through.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Quote Originally Posted by JimConlin View Post
    My bandsaw’s table takes a lot of force to tilt. It’d require a helper.

    All of the bevels are from square to a mild acute angles. I’m visualizing a fixture that has the templates on the top and bottom, a channel for the ‘victim’ on the side and some kind of handle on the top or back. As it’s run past the router bit, it’ll be rocked upward to keep both templates in contact with their pilot bearings.

    We’ll see how it works.

    This is the kind of bit.
    2EF10938-6E32-4951-A1F6-E29A2B1ADA86.jpeg
    If you have a bandsaw, and the piece is not so long as to be unmanageable, Jim Crickets method is dead simple, and does not require any new tooling that you will only use on one task. Mark out both faces. Cut the apex curve if it is curved. Then set up the guide fence that Jim uses and cut to the other line, rolling the stock as you feed it through the saw.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Cutting a rolling bevel

    Re cutting rolling bevel: Cut the max angle on the bandsaw, then mark and plane in the rolling smaller angles. (Or, I suppose you might say cut the minimum angle and then plane in the broader angles.) I think this happens a lot with stems, yes?

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